RAF : Officer / Pilot Entry Watch

Shen
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#101
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#101
Dont wanna be a wet blanket but all these guys talking about Six Form Scholarships and the Presentations, you do know that your actually forms (AFCO 103 and AFCO 4) have to be at Cranwell for November 31st??

I guess that gives you like 2 weeks to have your P2 Presentation, Study for your Filter interview (which despite what everyone says is bloody hard when dealing with the Six Form Scholarship,) have your filter interview and then give time for your forms and reference to be sent to Cranwell.

Good Luck?!?!

By the way filter interviews are fully booked for weeks at AFCO London

2 Weeks Notice
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NickNack
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#102
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#102
Just a note - its the 30th November (there aren't 31 days)
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Shen
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#103
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#103
lol

so yea...ummm

11 Days...

Shen
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NickNack
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#104
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#104
got my letter 2day - anyone else off to cranwell on the 18th jan for sixth form stuff??
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Shen
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#105
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#105
Argh i just got my exam timetable today and have exams when im meant to be at Cranwell...

Any ideas on what i can do?? This is P**s poor admin by the RAF planning six form scholarship OASC date whilst AS exams are going on...

Argh!!

Help

Shen
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NickNack
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#106
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#106
really? now uve got me worried, havent got my timetable yet.

Call this number (its in the red booklet you got with your invite to cranwell:

(01400) 261201
Ext. for surnames A-G: 6726, H-O: 6730, P-Z: 6788

They should be able to help rearrange the Cranwell date.
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creativesurgeon
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#107
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#107
Get an RAF recruitment pack from their website, I have, and it contains everything you'll need to know: finance, entry requirements, combat details, accomodation etc.
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steve_nels
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#108
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#108
Hi there, my post originally in this thread seems to hav been deleted lol. No idea why. So i will repeat it:

I was just wondering what life is like in the RAF. I'm currently studying my A-levels and still unsure on wether or not the RAF life is for me. I want to be a pilot (no suprise lol) but just wondering what the main benefits and disadvantages of being a pilot in the RAF. Also being an officer, what jobs and responsibilities do you have as an officer as well as a Pilot? I just want to get a general idea on what its like, such as duration of deployements, how often, responsibilities etc so i know what im letting myself in for if so to speak. I went to an RAF presentation a few weeks back and i dint really learn antything new. Just wondering if anyone could help me out.

Cheers
Steve
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Wzz
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#109
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#109
(Original post by steve_nels)
I want to be a pilot (no suprise lol) but just wondering what the main benefits and disadvantages of being a pilot in the RAF.
One of the main benefits is what you get paid to do every day. Today, it was ****ting with rain and overcast. Get airborne, switch to instruments, pick up a radar service, hit cloud at 800ft and by the time you get to 4000ft it's blue skies and sunshine. Dark visor down, look around, no-one else around as far as you can see and you've got clear skies all the way to space to play in.

Nothing beats that feeling, especially when you're on your own and are off to polish some aerobatic skills for a while, or something relatively easy.

You might like the idea of having a job which pushes you. By definition, every pilot is pushed pretty hard; everyone starts as a potential Harrier/Typhoon mate, and is restreamed for "easier" aircraft at whatever stage is appropriate, to keep them at the highest level they can manage.

Maybe you like the idea of serving your country. Maybe you like the idea of helping others. Maybe you like that a flying suit is probably the most comfortable outfit you could ever go to work in, could be anything.

(Original post by steve_nels)
Also being an officer, what jobs and responsibilities do you have as an officer as well as a Pilot?
Depends when. Through training; which is up to 5 years with holds right now; virtually nothing. Every junior officer on a station will have to be either Orderly Officer or Station Duty Officer at least a couple of times a year. You can't be SDO until you're a Flight Lieutenant with 3 years in the rank, so ignore that for now. OO's don't do too much, just deal with any problems regarding station personnel through the evening, and call the SDO with any real sticklers. Once serving on a squadron, you'll have your day to day work, plus a secondary duty. You might be OIC of a sports club, or the creche, or on the Officers' Mess committee. Running a club can be hard work, but you'll enjoy it, because you picked it as a duty and it's a sport you like. There are other duties; you might be a flight commander for some NCOs, and have some welfare, pastoral care and report writing duties, or discipline issues.

That's aside from flying. Email me if you want to know more about that.

(Original post by steve_nels)
I just want to get a general idea on what its like, such as duration of deployements, how often, responsibilities etc so i know what im letting myself in for if so to speak.
Deployments vary by type, and how many people are available to do them. In a "bad" year you might spend 6 months out of the country, but that'll be in 6-8 week lumps. Some are ****; tents in the mid east, that sort of thing (poor rotary chaps ). Some are brilliant; lots of fast jet mates go to Red Flag in the US annually, which involves a while staying on the strip in Vegas. Don't assume deployments aren't good; big hotel in the middle of Madrid? Vegas? It's nice when you're with an aircraft that knows exactly when to break down and strand you somewhere for a couple of days. I've heard some awesome stories!

(Original post by steve_nels)
I went to an RAF presentation a few weeks back and i dint really learn antything new. Just wondering if anyone could help me out.
Well, that has to cater to everything. Did you ask? They'll be able to tell you pretty much everything. How old are you? Contact your UAS if you're at uni age, else Air Cadets can (sometimes) be helpful.

Email me if you'd like to know any more. Hope this helps.
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Sire
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#110
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#110
You're a shoe in, provided you don't know the meaning of the word fear
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creativesurgeon
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#111
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#111
(Original post by Sire)
...provided you don't know the meaning of the word fear
Yeah, he's right. Joining the armed forces is something you have to be sure you wanna do - bear in mind, that although the RAF offer some of the best sponsorship opportunities, the also expect you to serve with them for 10 - 30 years. It isn't just a job - it is a career. Be absolutely sure this is what you wanna do.

Saying that, if you apply for an information pack, there is no obligation, and they don't follow you up (even though, when it comes down to conscription, you've shown an interest, so you'll be one of the first ones up there). If you then complete the interest form (which I havn't done), they then regard this as official interest. You are then given an appointment to meet Armed Forces Career Officers. They are actually there for you, to see if this is really what you wanna do - they ain't gonna want cadidates who are unwilling to fufil their service time.
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steve_nels
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#112
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#112
cheers Wzz. What do you mean by 6-8 week lumps by the way?
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obsolete
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#113
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#113
My brother, 12, loves planes and helicopters and stuff like that - to the point where he would build them all the time (models) and he know the names of loads and loves to go on and on about them. Yea he is only 12, but i think he may still want to do something to do with planes or become a pilot when he is onlder.

So my question is what do you have to do to become a commercial/fighter (more fighter) pilot, what qualifications u need, degrees etc.

I live in Northern Ireland... any one know anything about that?
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creativesurgeon
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#114
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#114
(Original post by obsolete)

I live in Northern Ireland... any one know anything about that?
Get an RAF Recruitment Pack - no obligation (read my earlier post).

But they may not take you - the MOD is understandably 'concerned' about recruiting the Northern Irish.

Go to: RAF Careers UK
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Wzz
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#115
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(Original post by steve_nels)
cheers Wzz. What do you mean by 6-8 week lumps by the way?
You're out of the country for 4 months in a year, say; but that's not 4 solid months, it's 6 weeks away, 2 months back, 2 weeks away, 6 months back, 8 weeks away and so on.
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NickNack
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#116
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(Original post by creativesurgeon)
Get an RAF Recruitment Pack - no obligation (read my earlier post).

But they may not take you - the MOD is understandably 'concerned' about recruiting the Northern Irish.

Go to: RAF Careers UK
It wont be a straight "no we wont have u cos ur from NI", otherwise u could sue for racism. NI is still part of the UK, and what they want are people who have been british citizens for 3+ years. Applications may go through additional background checks, but, assuming you dont have any dark secrets in your past you/ur bro have as much chance as the next person. They do advertise equal opportunities after all
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Wzz
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Being from NI doesn't make a blind bit of difference as far as your application's concerned; it's a part of the UK. The background checks, as far as you're concerned, will be the same.

Terms of service wise, if on a permanent commission, you'll serve until 38th birthday or you've completed 16 years service, whichever comes last.

If a graduate, you have a free option to leave after 12 years' service, but your pension rights change.

A short service commission means you're out after 12 for aircrew or 6 for ground branches, if I recall correctly.
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icklecathy
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#118
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(Original post by Wzz)
Being from NI doesn't make a blind bit of difference as far as your application's concerned; it's a part of the UK. The background checks, as far as you're concerned, will be the same.

Terms of service wise, if on a permanent commission, you'll serve until 38th birthday or you've completed 16 years service, whichever comes last.

If a graduate, you have a free option to leave after 12 years' service, but your pension rights change.

A short service commission means you're out after 12 for aircrew or 6 for ground branches, if I recall correctly.

I'm filling in my application form and have to choose whether to apply for a PC or SSC, what do you reckon?

Obviuosly there are good and bad things about both, like if you are miserable you are stuck with 16yrs on a PC, but if you only get a SSC and you love it, you might have to leave after 6.

Does it affect what the boarding officers think of you?

Cheers Wzz
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ShOcKzZ
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#119
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(Original post by icklecathy)
I'm filling in my application form and have to choose whether to apply for a PC or SSC, what do you reckon?

Obviuosly there are good and bad things about both, like if you are miserable you are stuck with 16yrs on a PC, but if you only get a SSC and you love it, you might have to leave after 6.

Does it affect what the boarding officers think of you?

Cheers Wzz
ur name looks somewhat familiar
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Wzz
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#120
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(Original post by icklecathy)
I'm filling in my application form and have to choose whether to apply for a PC or SSC, what do you reckon?

Obviuosly there are good and bad things about both, like if you are miserable you are stuck with 16yrs on a PC, but if you only get a SSC and you love it, you might have to leave after 6.

Does it affect what the boarding officers think of you?

Cheers Wzz
Well, I took a PC. Both have advantages as you've mentioned. As a graduate, as I mentioned, on a PC you have a 12 year option. Also, you have the opportunity to PVR and leave early.

Basically, it should fall to how you fell now. If you think this is the career for you, go PC because it's easier to pick now than later, and you can always PVR after. Don't go SSC and assume a PC upgrade will be possible if you love it, because it won't be. You can always PVR.

It obviously affects your pension rights too.

The boarding officers might; depending on who they are; decide to question why you've picked the commission you have, but not always. As tends to happen, the truth works best when answering that...!
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