RAF : Officer / Pilot Entry Watch

REME-Bod
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#1781
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#1781
(Original post by Nikki J S)
Just wanted to say good luck to REME and others who are going to OASC next week;not long to go now!! Hopefully they'll take pity on you and make sure you know the results before xmas.
Thanks
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Scorg
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#1782
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#1782
(Original post by Nikki J S)
Couldn't you just do certain modules to make up for ones you didn't pass, or doesn't it work like that?
That's pretty much what intermediate maths 2 is. Its something ive never done before and the ironic thing is, at Uni it was done in first year, but as I was a direct entrant to second year, I missed it.
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REME-Bod
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#1783
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#1783
(Original post by Scorg)
That's pretty much what intermediate maths 2 is. Its something ive never done before and the ironic thing is, at Uni it was done in first year, but as I was a direct entrant to second year, I missed it.
How does the maths you have missed relate to GCSE, O Level, A level, BTEC etc.
I've been out of school for nearly 17 years now, so I'm a little behind the times!
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Tommy Boy
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#1784
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#1784
What are you going for Bod?
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Scorg
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#1785
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#1785
(Original post by REME-Bod)
How does the maths you have missed relate to GCSE, O Level, A level, BTEC etc.
I've been out of school for nearly 17 years now, so I'm a little behind the times!
What I missed directly relates to obtaining a Credit level pass at scottish standard grades(which replaced the O Level in scotland). Which case it should be very similer to getting a top pass at GCSE.

For me I done my standard grades 8 years ago, I thought I had escaped all that now!
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Arch-Angel
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#1786
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#1786
(Original post by SimonHearne)
Well I'm up to 92 kilos now but I suppose being 6'3" balances it out, the weight limit is 106kilos? and I was 1cm off being to tall, lets hope I haven't grown since... And yup thats for 17-24 year olds, as long as you don't fail you'll be find, to get through OASC you need at least 1point from each stage (out of 4) except interview where you need 2...
I've got a chart somewhere...as usual my "filing system" needs an overhaul! I know for 6ft the maximum weight if classed as a large build is 95Kg (just under 15stone) for ground branches and 92Kg (I think! perhaps a little less - 92kg=14st 6). The figure is "ideal weight +15%" for aircrew and "ideal weight + 20%" for ground branches. So at first glance your weight is fine - but don't grow anymore!!

OASC can, however, decide to make you "medium build" or "small build". I've got no figures for them but unofficially I think you can subtract a minimum of 4 - 7 Kg from the weight limit for large build to work out the weight limit for medium build, depending on height.

If anyone is worried about their weight (I'm one of them until recently!) let me know and I'll find that weight chart and post the relevant info for you. It only shows the weight limit for "large build", however, you will have to be under this at your AFCO interview before they will send your application to OASC.

HTH
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Nikki J S
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#1787
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#1787
(Original post by Scorg)
What I missed directly relates to obtaining a Credit level pass at scottish standard grades(which replaced the O Level in scotland). Which case it should be very similer to getting a top pass at GCSE.

For me I done my standard grades 8 years ago, I thought I had escaped all that now!

You have to get equivalent to an a* to pass? :eek: I thought the RAF requirement for maths was an equivalent to a grade 'c'?
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REME-Bod
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#1788
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#1788
(Original post by Tommy Boy)
What are you going for Bod?
Engineer Officer (Most probably CE as that's my background).
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REME-Bod
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#1789
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#1789
(Original post by Arch-Angel)
I've got a chart somewhere...as usual my "filing system" needs an overhaul! I know for 6ft the maximum weight if classed as a large build is 95Kg (just under 15stone) for ground branches and 92Kg (I think! perhaps a little less - 92kg=14st 6). The figure is "ideal weight +15%" for aircrew and "ideal weight + 20%" for ground branches. So at first glance your weight is fine - but don't grow anymore!!

OASC can, however, decide to make you "medium build" or "small build". I've got no figures for them but unofficially I think you can subtract a minimum of 4 - 7 Kg from the weight limit for large build to work out the weight limit for medium build, depending on height.

If anyone is worried about their weight (I'm one of them until recently!) let me know and I'll find that weight chart and post the relevant info for you. It only shows the weight limit for "large build", however, you will have to be under this at your AFCO interview before they will send your application to OASC.

HTH
I've got the chart here. It's all in metric as opposed to real money, but it goes up to:

height=1.91 metre (6'3") Max weight (air)=98kg(15st 6lb) (Gnd)=102.3kg(16st 1lb)

This is all for LARGE frames as mentioned by Arch.
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flashman
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#1790
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#1790
(Original post by REME-Bod)
To be honest, having worked with the Artillery, I've yet to meet a better bunch of lads. (Apart from the cavalry).
On that topic, I'm considering applying for a commission in either the RAF or the army, and would like to know if there is any kind of qualities required for army officers which aren't for RAF officers, I guess there is more emphasis on leadership qualities as an army officer's job resolves around command whereas say, a pilots job resolves around being a pilot, but is there anything else, is it easier/harder to get into, would you have to be tougher, would it help to have come from a rich family and have gone to a public school?
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Nikki J S
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#1791
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#1791
Flashman, you asked the question about background/ schooling on the 'military blunders' thread, and Wzz provided you with a fairly comprehensive answer; I don't think it'll have changed in the space of a few months.
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REME-Bod
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#1792
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#1792
(Original post by flashman)
On that topic, I'm considering applying for a commission in either the RAF or the army, and would like to know if there is any kind of qualities required for army officers which aren't for RAF officers, I guess there is more emphasis on leadership qualities as an army officer's job resolves around command whereas say, a pilots job resolves around being a pilot, but is there anything else, is it easier/harder to get into, would you have to be tougher, would it help to have come from a rich family and have gone to a public school?
(Original post by Nikki J S)
Flashman, you asked the question about background/ schooling on the 'military blunders' thread, and Wzz provided you with a fairly comprehensive answer; I don't think it'll have changed in the space of a few months.
And background was mentioned in this thread too.

I was talking to a JEngo toaday at RAF Odiham and this very subject cropped up. He'd successfully completed RCB and was offered a position at Sandhurst, but declined it in favour of the RAF.

The two jobs are similar, yet very different. I cannot authoritively pass judgement because to do so I would have to have been in both situations in order to make a comparison, however I still have my opinions for what they're worth.

Physically the Army is more demanding as one would expect. This in itself also depends on the chosen field within the Army, i.e. an infantry platoon commander would have to be a damn sight fitter than an admin officer or catering officer, and this is reflected in the training.

As far as leadership goes, I'm sure that the RAF pilots who frequent this site would argue very strongly that their leadership qualities are second to none. Where do you think RAF officers go after their flying careers? Also, command and leadership are two distinctly different things. I see leadership as a quality either inherent or developed, whereas command is an appointment given to an individual. Not all commanders are good leaders .

Toughness is a difficult one, cos there's mental and physical strength. Tabbing across the Boonies with a bergen on your back in the middle of a cold wet windy night may be pretty lousy, but commanding a Flight, ensuring that the aircraft are up to speed and ready to fly, when you have the whole world putting pressure on you to have it ready by yesterday can't be all that much fun either.
Either way, you're an officer in charge of men and a responsibility to suit.

And as for background... NO IT DOESN'T MATTER where you are from. If you were dragged up from the gutter in the inner cities, or if daddy's estate was measured in acres, as long as you have a (relatively) clean sheet with the law, it doesn't matter a jot. To discriminate is illegal/prohibited/forbidden/against the law/ and not allowed either!

That's my view on the whole kaboodle. I'm sure there'll be plenty of people who would add to it.
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Scorg
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#1793
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#1793
(Original post by Nikki J S)
You have to get equivalent to an a* to pass? :eek: I thought the RAF requirement for maths was an equivalent to a grade 'c'?
With the Core maths 3 I have already that gives me the Level 3 standard grade equivalent, which I thought would be enough, but apparently it doesn't contain numeracy as part of that module, of which intermediate 2 does, so I guess its not that its the top pass but more its content.

Sounds a bit much I guess. But it will shoe im determained
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Wzz
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#1794
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#1794
(Original post by Nikki J S)
I suppose I didn't know what you meant when you said your rank stays low. I was asking if I would catch up with others who had left uni two years before me and been promoted.

The idea of being a 28 yr old Group Captain's isn't such a bad one. I don't think there's a rule that says you can't socialise with similar age Flight Lieutenants At least not a written one!

You'd be surprised! I certainly don't socialise with any Group Captains. I'll have a beer with the Boss if he's in the bar, but wouldn't socialise with him any more than etiquette dictates really.

And you're only in competition for promotion with other doctors; so you won't have done any extra time at uni!
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Wzz
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#1795
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#1795
(Original post by Arch-Angel)
Don't forget the weight limit! Don't know how it applies for sixth form scholorship's but there is a maxmium weight limit for both air and ground branches.

As for the fitness test, is it also dependant on age? In other words, whilst you young whippersnappers might have to hit level 12, i'm hoping that, as one of the "old and bold" folk coming up from the ranks, I'm looking for a more sedate level to reach on the fitness test!!

Over to you Wzz...
It'll be a sliding scale just like the AFT is normally; I assume the "excellent" level will drop with age too. No idea how much though!
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BlackHawk
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#1796
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#1796
(Original post by REME-Bod)
Engineer Officer (Most probably CE as that's my background).
Does the RAF offer places for CE's? I thought it was only ME, EE, or AeroE
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Wzz
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#1797
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#1797
You can join as an EngO with any engineering, maths or physics degree. Once through training you'll find yourself in either an Aerosystems or Communications/Electronics job; hence AS or CE.
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steve_nels
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#1798
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#1798
Im not sure if this is related to my case or not but this is just a thought as my nephew suffers from this. Will croup be a problem ? As this is similar, but the majority of young children suffer from this? This is highly unlikely to come back again in adulthood so what would the RAF see upon this? Its just out of interest really.


Croup is defined on the NHS as:

Introduction

Croup is the common name for a condition called laryngotracheitis. This is the inflammation and narrowing of the voice box (larynx), the main air tube to the lungs (trachea), and the larger branching air tubes (the bronchi). Croup is usually caused by a viral infection, and can be the result of a number of different viruses.

Croup causes the airways in the lungs to swell, which reduces the flow of air into and out of the lungs. In severe cases, this can make it difficult to breathe.

Croup affects children between the age of 6 months and 6 years. It is most common in children under 3 years old because their airways are narrower and more likely to become blocked when there is an infection. Croup usually occurs in the winter or early spring, and symptoms are more severe in younger children. Approximately one in ten children are admitted to hospital for a short time until the symptoms ease
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Nikki J S
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#1799
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#1799
(Original post by steve_nels)
Im not sure if this is related to my case or not but this is just a thought as my nephew suffers from this. Will croup be a problem ? As this is similar, but the majority of young children suffer from this? This is highly unlikely to come back again in adulthood so what would the RAF see upon this? Its just out of interest really.
It’s doubtful Steve, because I’m sure the doc would have recorded it as Croup in your medical records. Croup has fairly distinctive symptoms that would have easily been picked up i.e stridor (which is a harsh, vibrating, shrill sound made when breathing in, often described as a barking or seal like sound). Children with croup are treated either by steam inhalation, or glucocorticoids to reduce inflammation of the airways.

The condition that you had required a bronchodilator medication in the form of an inhaler to open up the airways, (These can also be used for croup in addition to the above). Because you said you only had treatment a couple of times, it’s likely that you used a short-acting medication that lasts up to 12 hours, which unfortunately are typically prescribed for relief or prevention of asthma symptoms or flare-ups.

You need to find out exactly the type of medication you were given and look up what it’s commonly used to treat. That may give you a better indication of what the doctor thought the specific illness/condition was at the time.
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BlackHawk
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#1800
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#1800
Quick question about Cranwell tomorrow. I know we wear suits on the way there but is it worth bringing casual clothes or at least a top to go with black trousers? Im bringing two suits at the minute Im just not sure how to pack the rest of it. :confused:
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