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    is the nightlife good ?

    is there fit girls ?

    is there lots of parties ?

    is it boring in exeter ?
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    (Original post by alexgmcm)
    I just got accepted on the MPhys physics course!
    Me too.
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    (Original post by fatherdaly)
    Me too.
    Which accomodation are you in? Llleyweln (damn it I will learn the spelling one day) or Cook mews here.

    Do we have to do anything before we go?

    Damn it seems so awesome, you looking forward to it?
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    (Original post by alexgmcm)
    Which accomodation are you in? Llleyweln (damn it I will learn the spelling one day) or Cook mews here.

    Do we have to do anything before we go?

    Damn it seems so awesome, you looking forward to it?
    Yeah I can't wait, and I think I applied for Hope hall (catered) I couldn't bear the thought of having to cook for myself.

    I don't know whether we have to do anything in particular before we go. I dunno if they're going to send us a book list or anything like that.
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    (Original post by fatherdaly)
    Yeah I can't wait, and I think I applied for Hope hall (catered) I couldn't bear the thought of having to cook for myself.

    I don't know whether we have to do anything in particular before we go. I dunno if they're going to send us a book list or anything like that.
    ah I found the course stuff here:
    http://newton.ex.ac.uk/teaching/stru...ture.html?F303
    each module lists the books required

    also there is a big list of all the physics books used here

    http://newton.ex.ac.uk/teaching/modu...-list-PHY.html

    Damn that's a lot of books.. tbh I think the only ones to worry about for the first year are the mathematics ones and young and freedman
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    (Original post by pacman7)
    is the nightlife good ?

    is there fit girls ?

    is there lots of parties ?

    is it boring in exeter ?
    Is the nightlife good?

    It's respectable. There's a reasonable mix but remember it's a city of 122,000 people- quite small.

    Fit girls?

    Thousands of them. Never knew which way to look!

    Lots of parties?

    Do you mean house parties? These happen all the time. There's pretty much something going on every night.

    Is it boring in Exeter?

    Depends what you like to get up to. There are over a hundred societies at the uni, so you shouldn't be bored. The shopping is decent now with Princesshay, there's enough to see and do but if you are fond of a very fast paced, big city life it's probably not for you.

    As for textbooks, you'll want Young and Freedman and one of Stroud's maths texts depending on which maths module you'll be doing. I've got them both for sale if anyones interested, it'll save you a lot of money.
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    Speaking of the maths modules, are they more like the mechanics modules of the A level or the further pure maths modules? I've always wondered how complex numbers and matrices are going to fit in to physics, do you find yourself using tools like these?
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    I think they are more like Further Pure, as it covers stuff like Fourier analysis in the harder maths module which looks seriously painful.
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    The physics maths, is actually harder than the maths maths =P

    Well I say that, but you all do things (Fourier Transforms and some other stuff) in first year (IIRC) which maths people don't touch either until 2nd/3rd/at all. I think physics covers allt he maths very quickly, whereas maths covers it in lots of detail...
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    There are two maths modules you can do in first year. If you got a B at A-level or higher, you'll probably do the harder module. Less, and you'll do the (much) easier one and do the hard one in 2nd year.

    Contents of the 'easy' module (PHY1115 Mathematical Skills):

    1. Algebra
    1. Linear equations
    2. Quadratic equations

    2. Trigonometry
    3. Binomial Series

    4. Differentiation
    1. Elementary differentiation
    2. Further differentiation

    5. Integration
    1. Introducing integration
    2. Basic integration
    3. Techniques of integration

    6. Vectors
    7. Curve sketching
    8. Taylor's Theorem

    9. Complex Numbers
    1. Introducing complex numbers
    2. Polar representation of complex numbers
    3. Complex algebra and Demoivre's theorem

    10. Hyperbolic Functions

    11. Differential Equations
    1. Introducing differential equations
    2. Solving first order differential equations
    3. Solving second order differential equations

    12. Advanced Topics
    1. Matrices
    2. Non-cartesian co-ordinates

    Contents of the 'hard' module (PHY1116 Mathematics for Physicists):

    1. Basic Algebra and Calculus
    1. Series: Taylor and Maclaurin series, expansions of standard functions.
    2. Complex numbers: Argand diagram, modulus-argument form, de Moivre's theorem, trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, series of sines and cosines.
    3. Linear equations and matrices: matrix multiplication, applications to the solution of systems of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, finding inverse matrices, evaluating numerical determinants, and an introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

    2. Coordinate Systems in 2- and 3-Dimensional Geometries
    1. Cartesian, plane-polar, cylindrical and spherical polar coordinate systems.

    3. Differential calculus
    1. Partial and total derivatives.
    2. Multiple integrals: line and surface integrals; application of integration to arc lengths, surface areas, volumes and masses; evaluation of multiple integrals in different coordinate systems and using parametrisation; integration of the Dirac delta function.

    4. Vectors and Vector Calculus
    1. Grad, div, curl, product rules, gradient as slope.
    2. Elementary cases of Stokes's theorem and the divergence theorem.

    5. Ordinary differential equations
    1. First-order separable and integrating-factor types.
    2. Linear second-order equations with constant coefficients; damped harmonic motion.

    6. Fourier analysis
    1. Fourier series: the concept of orthogonal functions, examples of Fourier series, Fourier series in exponential notation.
    2. Fourier transforms: derivation; examples of Fourier transforms, including exponential, 'top hat', the Dirac delta function, and the Gaussian function; the convolution integral and theorem.

    PHY1116 is a LOT harder than PHY1115. If you've done further maths, you'll probably do PHY1116.
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    Just a bump as we edge closer to Fresher's week.
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    I have a few more questions. So now you've finish, any regrets bout your choice of uni and course? With the benefit of hindsight do you think you made mistakes along the way? Given the poor prospects for graduates in finding a good job, do you think physics has help you, and if so then why?
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    (Original post by Jamjar)
    I have a few more questions. So now you've finish, any regrets bout your choice of uni and course? With the benefit of hindsight do you think you made mistakes along the way? Given the poor prospects for graduates in finding a good job, do you think physics has help you, and if so then why?
    Finding a job in this current economic climate will be ALOT easier if you have a degree, as opposed to not having one. Does that answer your question?

    When it comes to right choice of uni and course, you will obviously apply to where you think is best for you at the time. At the end of 3 or 4 years of learning, you may not feel the same way, but hindsight in a wonderful thing. And of course, everyone makes mistakes. I wouldn't mind going back and trying a bit harder in my 2nd year, but can't. So just have to try my hardest in final year.
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    ^^ No, it won't. How does a whole summer on the dole after two degrees sound? Not to mention the truckloads of work experience (paid and voluntary) and society experience at uni that I had? The only way I could find work was to move overseas. A degree is not a golden ticket.
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    Yeah, there are so many people at my workplace (a crappy £6 an hour call centre) with degrees. It's kind of soul destroying hearing how people with degrees in Law, Maths, History etc can only find work in the kind of jobs they'd have been able to get at 18 without a degree, when I'm about to enter into my first year. Despatches or was it Panorama(?!) did a programme on the 'middle class' and unemployed and it showed people with Masters from Bristol uni having to apply for jobs at dominos pizza.

    I think you have to have a clear idea of where you want to be after your degree and how you're going to get there. I want to enter into a very small and really competitive field of work and recognise my degree and even some work experience won't be good enough. I'm literally going to have to try and get work experience and internships during every holiday (which will be hard enough) to build up contacts, learn to speak French to an, at least, semi-fluent level from scratch in 3 years, write for a student paper, organise my own event and even then I can recognise I'll probably have to live unpaid in London for at least 6 months after my degree doing an unpaid graduate internship, before I can find paid work. Even then, there's no guarantee.

    Of course, it depends on what you want to do, but if you're aiming for graduate scheme type jobs it's so competitive there is definitely a chance you'll struggle to find what you want and have to resort to lower paid, dead end jobs.
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    Well it seems I've hit a raw nerve here! In this dire economic climate, where the chances of getting a worthwhile job with good career prospects after graduation is pretty slim. Perhaps applying for a so-called "mickey mouse" degree from an ex-poly that shoe-horns you in to that desirable job would be a better proposition? But then when you think about it, the market would be saturated with mickey mouse degrees that they would indeed be worthless. So pursuing a worthy degree from a Russell Group or 1994 Group member university would after all be the sensible course of action. I do recognise that ex-polys do have worthy vocational degrees of value.:rolleyes:
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    I think the thing is you start uni so bouyed up on "hey, fantastic A level results, you'll really enjoy uni, have the time of your life, get a degree" and then you kind of, don't. You have an okay time, get a piece of paper and rawr you're in the world.

    I think high expectations lead to disappointment. The reality is that a degree is not a free pass and you may find yourself earning the same min wage you did before you started uni. You just have to hope that the piece of paper along with some serious hard graft will open up a door further along the line.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    ^^ No, it won't. How does a whole summer on the dole after two degrees sound? Not to mention the truckloads of work experience (paid and voluntary) and society experience at uni that I had? The only way I could find work was to move overseas. A degree is not a golden ticket.
    Where did I say that it was a golden ticket? A degree is no free pass, but there are alot more opportunities open to you if you have a degree, as opposed to not having one. Surely you can't deny that? My friend was planning on not going back to Uni after the summer, but after a few weeks job hunting she realised that she was no way going to find a half decent job, in this country or in any other, without some kind of further education. Your situation is unfortunate, but obviously it is hard for anyone to find work these days. Which is why further education is an even more desirable option.
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    (Original post by Jamjar)
    Well it seems I've hit a raw nerve here! In this dire economic climate, where the chances of getting a worthwhile job with good career prospects after graduation is pretty slim. Perhaps applying for a so-called "mickey mouse" degree from an ex-poly that shoe-horns you in to that desirable job would be a better proposition? But then when you think about it, the market would be saturated with mickey mouse degrees that they would indeed be worthless. So pursuing a worthy degree from a Russell Group or 1994 Group member university would after all be the sensible course of action. I do recognise that ex-polys do have worthy vocational degrees of value.:rolleyes:
    This post is fairly irrelevant. You asked about the Physics course at Exeter. Physics is not a "mickey mouse" vocational degree, nor is Exeter an ex-poly. Do a mickey mouse degree if you want. I think finding any graduate job these days is pretty much down to luck anyway.
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    I agree with sophisticated. The massive increase in graduates has made it harder for graduates to find work, but it has also made it infinitely harder for non-graduates to find work, it's kind of like inflation really.

    Also I just enrolled in Physics at Exeter so hopefully it's not that bad a course :p: but tbh with something like Physics you have to kind of expect to do a PhD or at least a Masters, a BSc in Physics isn't *that* useful to an employer except for possibly the general mathematical skills but they can hire some guy with a masters in Applied Maths for the same salary in a recession so it doesn't really help.
 
 
 
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