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The 2.1 requirement is a joke Watch

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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    I respect them for succeeding, but I don't respect those that fail.
    If you approach any business venture (or anything in life) without acknowledging failure might happen, you are going in with the wrong mind set.

    Secondly, if these guys thought like you did, they would be discouraged from doing what they did , incase they failed out of feeling inadequate.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Corporates are not the only companies out there mate.

    Actually as my line of work is start up, I always get recruiters contact me on linked in for programming roles, now that I have years of experience.

    You can also try and make it through self employment like Sugar did.

    It just requires you to think outside the box, by spotting a gap in the market and exploiting it. Which is something university can't teach you btw.
    Its called pipelining a candidate pool, all consultants have to do it. If you have an hour or two dialout a day to candidates. Its just a way of lead generation, you speak to 100s of grads a day thats just how the recruitment process works, its sending out bulk with the view to getting one diamond. Why don't you understand this, its on all recruitment forums, its on linkedin groups.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    You need a personality, "people buy from people". If he is all textbook and doesn't have the Harvey Spector charm, he needs to see a life coach or time to talk on the NHS.
    He is actually a very social guy.

    But the trouble is, they are picking and choosing, and might not always get it right.
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    Should have tried harder.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Its called pipelining a candidate pool, all consultants have to do it. If you have an hour or two dialout a day to candidates. Its just a way of lead generation, you speak to 100s of grads a day thats just how the recruitment process works, its sending out bulk with the view to getting one diamond. Why don't you understand this, its on all recruitment forums, its on linkedin groups.
    Well you know what, I never had any recruiters contact me prior to racking up industry experience.

    The point is, at least I am being contacted - it might lead to somewhere if I actually followed the leads up.

    Finally, my industrial experience is not ****.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Yes, difficulties in degrees varies.

    STEM subjects are harder generally with higher drop out rates.

    Ivy league unis probably have more rigorous degrees, even that is questionable - outside of oxbridge, it is not that much different.

    Sloane went to KCL and did geography, he found it really easy - the essay writing, and that is not because he is a genius either.

    But you know what, employers do not discriminate, the whole system is a bit of a mess tbh.
    Even within the same course, and excluding Oxbridge, courses vary dramatically. I can only talk for maths, but Wawrick maths vs Manchester maths is already a vast gap, and those universities are consider close in difficulty.
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    (Original post by Nomes89)
    I'm not sure anyone's suggested all degrees are equal, rather that 2.1s from lesser universities still require hard work. Correct me if I'm wrong though.
    Yes, but noramlly (and I really mean normally, I am not saying this applies to everyone), those who go to lower universities are typically less academic, so need to put more work in anyway. If someone who is good enough for a very high up university applies to a very low one, they will likely get a very good score with minimum work.
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    (Original post by mikebrown1)
    What you did 3 years ago isn't going to bother a company as much as what you did at uni studying since then. Not getting a 2:1 has limited your options but there are still jobs out there.

    They are not mocking you. You seem to think you are better than what you are. Someone who got at least 2 A*s at a-level with high aspirations should have got a 2:1 fairly easily. As you said, you didn't perform and that has set you back. But you are the only one to blame, not companies you are trying to apply to.

    Yeah but the point is, he isn't even considered, whereas those who received a possibly only slight % higher from an 'easier' degree (let's not pretend that all degrees have the same level of difficulty) at an easier uni (same with this) are. It is unfair, but unfortunately when you have standards such as this, which try to filter applicants on a large scale rather than individually, some will be unjustly disadvantaged.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Well you know what, I never had any recruiters contact me prior to racking up industry experience.

    The point is, at least I am being contacted - it might lead to somewhere if I actually followed the leads up.

    Finally, my industrial experience is not ****.
    Recruiters, LMAO, other day some smart ass called me off CV library about a PR Directors role told them straight. Do you really think I would get a job in PR, so stop wasting my time. No when your targeted on call time, you will call just about anyone, I usually finish off my call time with telephone banking numbers and putting the numbers on hold (landlines)..
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    (Original post by james22)
    Even within the same course, and excluding Oxbridge, courses vary dramatically. I can only talk for maths, but Wawrick maths vs Manchester maths is already a vast gap, and those universities are consider close in difficulty.
    If this is such a problem, why doesn't the government only have a selection of universities accessible by the public, that all share exactly the same curriculum.

    That way you will stop the problem form manifesting to begin with.

    You can't blame people, especially 20 odd year old kids, if they make misinformed decisions due to a lack of guidance and maturity.

    In hindsight its always easier to point out where you have gone wrong through experience, but its better to standardise everything in the first place.
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    (Original post by a10)
    I love how people like you start comparing the extremes and say X course at the University of Cambridge is harder than X course at London Met Uni...

    No **** sherlock..
    The difference in difficult is huge even between Cambridge and other very high up universities. Cambridge maths vs Manchester maths for example are not compareable degrees at all, the former is far far harder.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Yes, difficulties in degrees varies.

    STEM subjects are harder generally with higher drop out rates.

    Ivy league unis probably have more rigorous degrees, even that is questionable - outside of oxbridge, it is not that much different.

    Sloane went to KCL and did geography, he found it really easy - the essay writing, and that is not because he is a genius either.

    But you know what, employers do not discriminate, the whole system is a bit of a mess tbh.
    I had a private tutor, he managed my workload. I was just a torso, whatever he said, I agreed with. When I got something I just forwarded it on, I treated him like a worker. Any degree can be run like a business, same as doing with pharmacy at UCL. I never enjoyed studying and never will, its a means to an end.
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    (Original post by james22)
    Yes, but noramlly (and I really mean normally, I am not saying this applies to everyone), those who go to lower universities are typically less academic, so need to put more work in anyway. If someone who is good enough for a very high up university applies to a very low one, they will likely get a very good score with minimum work.
    TBH if you think success in the commercial environment is purely down to being a bookworm, you are gravely mistaken.

    You wouldn't have the Alan Sugars in the world, if that was the case.

    More to the point, if your goal in life is to go onto become an academic, than your point is very valid.

    Some people don't enjoy studying mate, they thrive in the commercial environment.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    If this is such a problem, why doesn't the government only have a selection of universities accessible by the public, that all share exactly the same curriculum.

    That way you will stop the problem form manifesting to begin with.

    You can't blame people, especially 20 odd year old kids, if they make misinformed decisions due to a lack of guidance and maturity.

    In hindsight its always easier to point out where you have gone wrong through experience, but its better to standardise everything in the first place.
    Parental confrontation, they need to be accountable for bad decisions.As well educated as my dad is, I will have a scrap with him. Btw in life when someone is misinformed they usually face the consequences, i.e. financial penalties. If a parent isn't fit enough to bring up kids then they shouldn't have them in the first place.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    TBH if you think success in the commercial environment is purely down to being a bookworm, you are gravely mistaken.
    I don't think that, and have never said anything like that at all.

    You wouldn't have the Alan Sugars in the world, if that was the case.

    More to the point, if your goal in life is to go onto become an academic, than your point is very valid.
    I compeltely agree with you here. I have not mentioned employment or employers once on this thread.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    I had a private tutor, he managed my workload. I was just a torso, whatever he said, I agreed with. When I got something I just forwarded it on, I treated him like a worker. Any degree can be run like a business, same as doing with pharmacy at UCL. I never enjoyed studying and never will, its a means to an end.

    Not everyone has access to a private tutor.

    The reason why you also did a lot better this time, is because your study habbits have matured.

    It's not all about intelligence, its about attitude and outlook in life. Parents, schools have a responsibility to drill kids the right way - blame them.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    TBH if you think success in the commercial environment is purely down to being a bookworm, you are gravely mistaken.

    You wouldn't have the Alan Sugars in the world, if that was the case.

    More to the point, if your goal in life is to go onto become an academic, than your point is very valid.

    Some people don't enjoy studying mate, they thrive in the commercial environment.
    They seriously struggle, I struggle with the basic tasks of everyday work. Im lucky I have people below me that check the mistakes.
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    (Original post by james22)
    I don't think that, and have never said anything like that at all.



    I compeltely agree with you here. I have not mentioned employment or employers once on this thread.
    Well this whole thread is about graduate schemes, and the academic cut off points.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Not everyone has access to a private tutor.

    The reason why you also did a lot better this time, is because your study habbits have matured.

    It's not all about intelligence, its about attitude and outlook in life. Parents, schools have a responsibility to drill kids the right way - blame them.
    Thats why I worked pretty much full time at university. It was your choice not to have a job, it cost you. I love going to work, the banter is priceless.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Well this whole thread is about graduate schemes, and the academic cut off points.
    I know, I was replying to a side point though.
 
 
 
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