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    (Original post by Cheesypotato)
    Oh that's good to hear!! I only got a reply from Nottingham, a conditional offer A*AA. The rest I'm still waiting on. It's so exciting yet scary waiting for a reply. I think Bath cause they have a year in industry but I'm still not sure!

    What courses have you applied to?
    Congrats with nottingham!! I was almost gonna apply there but I prefer the exeter course!
    When'd you send your ucas off?
    I applied tooooo bath cambridge durham exeter and leeds. Have a*aa offers for all but cambridge, which I hear back from in about 2 weeks!!!


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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    Congrats with nottingham!! I was almost gonna apply there but I prefer the exeter course!
    When'd you send your ucas off?
    I applied tooooo bath cambridge durham exeter and leeds. Have a*aa offers for all but cambridge, which I hear back from in about 2 weeks!!!


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    The first week of December haha not too long ago. What's the course in Exeter like? compared to nottingham. Oh wow that's great! All the best! and also which is your top uni?
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    Does anyone have an offer from Durham yet?
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    (Original post by pbaps)
    Does anyone have an offer from Durham yet?
    I got one around a week and a half ago
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    I got one around a week and a half ago
    ooh well done! out of interest, how long ago did you submit your subject choices?
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    (Original post by pbaps)
    ooh well done! out of interest, how long ago did you submit your subject choices?
    Submitted them along with my application on 7th October!
    Where else did you apply to?
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    Submitted them along with my application on 7th October!
    Where else did you apply to?
    fair enough! I didn't find out about it until they emailed me in november so I replied straight away and then got the exact same email again last week because somehow it didn't work the first time
    oxford, sheffield, exeter and durham twice
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    (Original post by pbaps)
    fair enough! I didn't find out about it until they emailed me in november so I replied straight away and then got the exact same email again last week because somehow it didn't work the first time
    oxford, sheffield, exeter and durham twice
    Ugh that's really annoying haha. Mine aren't even accurate anymore like I chose earth sciences as one of my subjects and no way do I wanna do that anymore :')
    Ooh that isn't natsci everywhere, is it? I've applied to Exeter for NatSci ) Ooh you hear bacK from Oxford on Tuesday
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    Ugh that's really annoying haha. Mine aren't even accurate anymore like I chose earth sciences as one of my subjects and no way do I wanna do that anymore :')
    Ooh that isn't natsci everywhere, is it? I've applied to Exeter for NatSci ) Ooh you hear bacK from Oxford on Tuesday
    Haha yeah since I looked at the modules my choices have changed too! No, only at durham - biology at exeter and sheffield, anthropology at durham and human sciences at oxford, pretty scared to hear from them though... :eek:
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    Bump.

    I've had all my offers so far, except... St Andrews (Chem though)

    Got both my NatSci
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    I'm starting sixth form in September so I've got loads of time to worry about this stuff but I know I want to do PhysNatSci and wanted to know if there's anything you can recommend (extracurricular-wise) to help with uni applications and that sort of thing? I figure the sooner I can do all that the better


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    (Original post by mollyrt)
    I'm starting sixth form in September so I've got loads of time to worry about this stuff but I know I want to do PhysNatSci and wanted to know if there's anything you can recommend (extracurricular-wise) to help with uni applications and that sort of thing? I figure the sooner I can do all that the better


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    Do a Nuffield Research Placement!! They're good fun (and you get paid!)
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    I'm potentially a 2016 applicant but I'm pretty indecisive about what I should do. I've had a look at the options so far but it's very difficult to decide what to do. As an AS student I haven't had a full idea of my courses yet which doesn't really help. However my main areas of interest are genetics, evolution, quantum physics and astrophysics. I've started a bit of further reading with a brief history of time and the ancestor's tale.

    The thing I'm wondering is whether mixing up your options gives you worse chances later on. For example if I decided to do evolution and behaviour, materials science and physics, would that give me a worse chance in those fields later down the line than someone who specialised more for their science. If a person mixes physics with biology will they have worse prospects later on than someone who did pure biology?

    So I really don't know which choices to pick but it's probably a mixture of: the biological courses, physics, chemistry, materials.
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    Finally a Natural Sciences thread! I have had all the offers now and I'm firming Queens College Cambridge and having UEA as my insurance. Anyone else putting either of those two down?
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    (Original post by joanneeve)
    Finally a Natural Sciences thread! I have had all the offers now and I'm firming Queens College Cambridge and having UEA as my insurance. Anyone else putting either of those two down?
    I'M QUEENS COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE FOR NATSCI TOO OMG!! Ahh I'll PM you there are so few of us haha
    I really did like the natsci course at UEA, but I applied (and am insuring) durham instead!
    Are you physical or biological?
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    (Original post by mttailz)
    I'm potentially a 2016 applicant but I'm pretty indecisive about what I should do. I've had a look at the options so far but it's very difficult to decide what to do. As an AS student I haven't had a full idea of my courses yet which doesn't really help. However my main areas of interest are genetics, evolution, quantum physics and astrophysics. I've started a bit of further reading with a brief history of time and the ancestor's tale.

    The thing I'm wondering is whether mixing up your options gives you worse chances later on. For example if I decided to do evolution and behaviour, materials science and physics, would that give me a worse chance in those fields later down the line than someone who specialised more for their science. If a person mixes physics with biology will they have worse prospects later on than someone who did pure biology?

    So I really don't know which choices to pick but it's probably a mixture of: the biological courses, physics, chemistry, materials.
    I would focus on getting in first, and that really means working on maths, extended problem solving questions, and doing some consolidation and extra reading.

    In your situation, you would likely apply as a Physical NatSci. To answer your question; in first year - no, you wouldn't have worse prospects later on really. Doing lots of biology options is an advantage because your courses will compliment each other and you will see some overlap. Similarly, for physics the *only* requirement for 2nd and 3rd year is to do 1st year physics and 1st year maths.

    However, realise that the course is not as flexible as you think. You cannot, for example, realistically do IA maths, Chemistry, Physics, Materials, and biology course(s). I did 5 subjects in first year and that was a mistake.

    Also, for later years you pretty much have to specialise or at least cut this down to 2 options. So you could potentially do Physics A, Physics B, Materials. Or perhaps 2 biology courses + Chemistry B. This is then further compounded by 3rd year, when you choose a single subject. There is also an option to stay general, but this is basically a cop-out which involves doing half of 2nd year again.


    I'm also going to point out that you will likely find the biology modules tedious and frustrating. Evolution and behaviour, as reading, is interesting. But learning thousands of different species, examples, exceptions and then writing a lot of essays on that will take its toll. My experience with this is that something like 30% of the course is new and interesting, but then gets tedious when you are made to learn it inside out. About 40% of the course builds from previous knowledge in an interesting direction, and this becomes more tedious faster. And roughly 30% of the course is just boring anyway.

    If you have long-term aspirations as a geneticist or biologist, then it's probably a better idea to focus on chemistry and/or biochemistry in your degree, and then specialize and take a different route later on. Similarly, if you want to eventually specialise in chemistry/ Materials Science then it might actually be a better idea to just do a physics degree as an undergrad due to the skills, practice and knowledge you will gain. And if you are really serious about becoming a quantum physicist then you're better off just applying for a pure maths degree.
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    (Original post by R T)
    I would focus on getting in first, and that really means working on maths, extended problem solving questions, and doing some consolidation and extra reading.

    In your situation, you would likely apply as a Physical NatSci. To answer your question; in first year - no, you wouldn't have worse prospects later on really. Doing lots of biology options is an advantage because your courses will compliment each other and you will see some overlap. Similarly, for physics the *only* requirement for 2nd and 3rd year is to do 1st year physics and 1st year maths.

    However, realise that the course is not as flexible as you think. You cannot, for example, realistically do IA maths, Chemistry, Physics, Materials, and biology course(s). I did 5 subjects in first year and that was a mistake.

    Also, for later years you pretty much have to specialise or at least cut this down to 2 options. So you could potentially do Physics A, Physics B, Materials. Or perhaps 2 biology courses + Chemistry B. This is then further compounded by 3rd year, when you choose a single subject. There is also an option to stay general, but this is basically a cop-out which involves doing half of 2nd year again.


    I'm also going to point out that you will likely find the biology modules tedious and frustrating. Evolution and behaviour, as reading, is interesting. But learning thousands of different species, examples, exceptions and then writing a lot of essays on that will take its toll. My experience with this is that something like 30% of the course is new and interesting, but then gets tedious when you are made to learn it inside out. About 40% of the course builds from previous knowledge in an interesting direction, and this becomes more tedious faster. And roughly 30% of the course is just boring anyway.

    If you have long-term aspirations as a geneticist or biologist, then it's probably a better idea to focus on chemistry and/or biochemistry in your degree, and then specialize and take a different route later on. Similarly, if you want to eventually specialise in chemistry/ Materials Science then it might actually be a better idea to just do a physics degree as an undergrad due to the skills, practice and knowledge you will gain. And if you are really serious about becoming a quantum physicist then you're better off just applying for a pure maths degree.
    You can do 5 subjects?!

    Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Cells and Materials for example?

    Although it's more the narrowing in second year I'd struggle with, which is why I'm thinking just switching to ChemEng so I can do maths/physics ,bit of chem (even a focus on bio tech) along with the language option
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    You can do 5 subjects?!

    Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Cells and Materials for example?

    Although it's more the narrowing in second year I'd struggle with, which is why I'm thinking just switching to ChemEng so I can do maths/physics ,bit of chem (even a focus on bio tech) along with the language option
    Officially, on the system you do 4.
    But it wasn't particularly hard to force my way into supervisions and practicals. And, of course, any student can attend any lecture. The problem was that I was juggling too many ECs as well, and then once I started falling behind on work, suddenly I was very far behind. I was so far behind that I missed a lot of Easter term work, which is probably the reason I missed a first. You'd think that I would have learned from this, but the exact same situation happened again this year (trying to do too much), except this year I then did significantly worse in my exams because it became actually impossible to catch up properly.

    2nd year chemistry still has a lot of maths. Chemistry A should really be re-named "physics for chemists" or something. It covers quantum, mathematical symmetry, huckel methods, statistical thermodynamics and solid state physics.

    A (likely) demanding, yet rewarding, set of options for 2nd year could also be double Physics + chemistry B. This would allow 3rd year physics or chemistry. But you would be doing about 3.5 subjects because of the forced supplementary maths course for physics.

    I don't know anything about ChemEng. I only know people who are doing it, and say it's good.
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    (Original post by R T)
    Officially, on the system you do 4.
    But it wasn't particularly hard to force my way into supervisions and practicals. And, of course, any student can attend any lecture. The problem was that I was juggling too many ECs as well, and then once I started falling behind on work, suddenly I was very far behind. I was so far behind that I missed a lot of Easter term work, which is probably the reason I missed a first. You'd think that I would have learned from this, but the exact same situation happened again this year (trying to do too much), except this year I then did significantly worse in my exams because it became actually impossible to catch up properly.

    2nd year chemistry still has a lot of maths. Chemistry A should really be re-named "physics for chemists" or something. It covers quantum, mathematical symmetry, huckel methods, statistical thermodynamics and solid state physics.

    A (likely) demanding, yet rewarding, set of options for 2nd year could also be double Physics + chemistry B. This would allow 3rd year physics or chemistry. But you would be doing about 3.5 subjects because of the forced supplementary maths course for physics.

    I don't know anything about ChemEng. I only know people who are doing it, and say it's good.
    What ECs did you do if you don't mind me asking?

    Hmmmm... I would also want to do the neuro and pharmacology so was thinking those 2 and Chemistry B. But I'm not sure if that would be a decent combination

    Hesitation with ChemEng is not a lot of the Chemistry theory, just the scaling up and such
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    What ECs did you do if you don't mind me asking?

    Hmmmm... I would also want to do the neuro and pharmacology so was thinking those 2 and Chemistry B. But I'm not sure if that would be a decent combination

    Hesitation with ChemEng is not a lot of the Chemistry theory, just the scaling up and such
    Lacrosse and rowing were the ones that really killed my free time (travelling for matches, and doing exhausting aerobic fitness sessions frequently mainly).
    The other main killers were having a social life/ having friends and having small interests such as reading and checking up things on the internet/ reddit/ etc.

    Having said this, what I did does not excuse my poor mark. I could have got a first with the remaining free time, I am just not committed/ motivated. Hopefully part II being the year that "counts" will shock me into action like it did for GCSE/A-Level.


    I think straying too far into biology is a mistake if you are interested in doing research later on. If you are actually a brilliant physicist, you should take advantage of this and be 'the neurologist who is amazing at diff. geom'. It's a better idea to stick to ChemEng/Physics/Chemistry because this will improve your research prospects and your job prospects (if academia does not interest you). For example: in neuro/ Pharm, there is nothing you will learn in cambridge that a textbook cannot teach you. Furthermore, even if you were to become a specialist in either of these areas, a complete knowledge of the subject is not necessary as you will become familiar with the theory anyway. What is necessary in a specialist position is practical skills, write-up skills and problem solving/ creative thinking. All of these will be taught better in the chemistry/ physics/ even maths depts.

    Edit: to counter my own post, the only advantage to doing a "soft" biology option would be to make the most of supervisions and lecturers' guidance and pick their thoughts. This could be useful before going into research. However, I think I would maintain my own opinion. The best way to avoid specializing permanently/ making a mistake is to stay as pure as possible. The caveat is that you don't want to be stuck in part II physics and suddenly realise that you find this stuff way too hard and you are in the bottom 5% of the year group. And therefore the advice is slightly more like "do the purest subject that you would enjoy and do well in".

    The scaling up? I don't follow?
 
 
 
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