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    (Original post by PhoebeZeitgeist)
    How incredibly patronizing... I totally agree with her. IF my mother explicitly told me she would not want to live through a certain disease if it got very bad, and I knew she meant it, and she verified it again at the time, who would I be to deny her that? I am not saying it would be nice and I wouldn't like it, but who am I to force someone to live?
    And yes, my mum means a lot to me.
    This.
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    I guess I'm not emotionally strong to have to go through that, even though it's patronizing. Anyways just pray that nothing bad happens to your mum(not saying that something will happen).
    As much as we pray, bad things will happen to virtually all of us. It's a sad truth, but it's better to realise it and deal with it mentally than it is to be unprepared when something untoward happens.
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    (Original post by jammiebreadman)
    Are doctors in the Netherlands required to help patients who want euthanasia?? Is there no conscientious object rule or something??
    No, they aren't. It would be quite cruel to enforce that kind of thing I would say, so I think it's good that it's this way.
    What I do know is that nowadays, there is a committee which looks at all the cases of euthanasia to determine if the doctor made sure that the person was sure of their choice etc. I'm looking at a news report about 2008, which says that there were 2146 cases of euthanasia reported and 152 assisted suicides (this is where the doctor supplies some sort of drug with which someone call kill themself, but similarly to euthanasia, you obviously cannot just go to a doctor, say "give me some drugs" and they'll give it to you). In 10 of the cases the committee felt the doctor hadn't acted in accordance to the guidelines and rules, and those were then investigated (the outcome of the investigations isn't there).

    Obviously the committee won't be perfect, and possible not every case of euthanasia is reported, but it seems like a reasonable system to me.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    :giggle:

    Sorry.
    Np, I felt the same way when I read it back :teehee:
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    I agree with voluntary euthanasia being a human right, i make all the other decisions in my life so why shouldn't i be able to make that one?
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    Suicide shouldn't be legalised not only for the sakes of the victim but also for the sakes of the doctors who have to care it out. Besides, in conditions were euthanasia comes in question neither the patient/victim and neither the patients family would be in a healthy state to judge over the patients life. Moreover, what I fear most, is that when euthanasia becomes legal God forbids; it would gain popularity and become a victim of irresponsible idiots.
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    (Original post by theBOON)
    Suicide shouldn't be legalised not only for the sakes of the victim but also for the sakes of the doctors who have to care it out. Besides, in conditions were euthanasia comes in question neither the patient/victim and neither the patients family would be in a healthy state to judge over the patients life. Moreover, what I fear most, is that when euthanasia becomes legal God forbids; it would gain popularity and become a victim of irresponsible idiots.
    What if the person had to get a ruling from a court to say that they could be euthanised if they wished?
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    (Original post by theBOON)
    Suicide shouldn't be legalised not only for the sakes of the victim but also for the sakes of the doctors who have to care it out. Besides, in conditions were euthanasia comes in question neither the patient/victim and neither the patients family would be in a healthy state to judge over the patients life. Moreover, what I fear most, is that when euthanasia becomes legal God forbids; it would gain popularity and become a victim of irresponsible idiots.
    Suicide is already legal in the UK. Criminalising it would be unenforceable anyway (and the previous law against suicide merely punished the families of the deceased with financial penalties).
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    I'm all for euthanasia. People have the right to die rather than to suffer every second. It's your life, you get to choose when you end it. I find it upsetting that people attempt to find arguments against this right!

    I'm not proud of my homecountry/Belgium by any means, but I'm very glad that they were one of the first, and unfortunately only countries in the world to legalise euthanasia.

    And people, euthanasia does NOT equal suicide tsk.
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    (Original post by DMV)
    What if the person had to get a ruling from a court to say that they could be euthanised if they wished?
    First I don't agree that a person life should be decided by a court/state. Second, if they want to be euthanasia (even though I don't agree with their decision) they'd have to care with it themselves instead of involving anyone else with their euthanasia.
    Third this situation is not realisable because ruling or not they'd still need confirmation at that precise moment whether or not the patient should be killed and as I said before the patient wouldn't be in a healthy mental state to confirm.
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    My main concerns are that the procedure would demoralise doctors and also that it could be seen as the easy way out when we could learn vital things about the treatment of illness by taking a more positive attitude towards it.

    Having said that I know that if I was in a state such as the one experienced by Stephen Hawkings I would definitely desire help to die.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Suicide is already legal in the UK. Criminalising it would be unenforceable anyway (and the previous law against suicide merely punished the families of the deceased with financial penalties).
    Yeah I know but euthanasia could be unenforced.
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    (Original post by Ines24)
    I'm all for euthanasia. People have the right to die rather than to suffer every second. It's your life, you get to choose when you end it. I find it upsetting that people attempt to find arguments against this right!

    I'm not proud of my homecountry/Belgium by any means, but I'm very glad that they were one of the first, and unfortunately only countries in the world to legalise euthanasia.

    And people, euthanasia does NOT equal suicide tsk.
    Out of curiosity, would it be legal for a foreigner to go to Beglium for euthanasia? As I believe that Switzerland are considering moves to stop "euthanasia tourism", restricting it to Swiss citizens.
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    (Original post by theBOON)
    If they want to be euthanasia (even though I don't agree with their decision) they'd have to care with it themselves instead of involving anyone else with their euthanasia.
    It's this mentality which causes some very desperate, terminally ill people to end their lives early, before they become to infirm to kill themselves, and need to rely on someone else.

    Seriously - that's the choice you are asking people to make with legislation like that.

    a) Do I kill myself when I still have mobility? When I still have quality of life?
    b) Do I leave it a little longer and risk not being able to do it myself? Lie in some bed suffering, wishing I had killed myself while I was still mobile?
    c) Do I wait until I am immobile, and illegally involve my children/friends/health care worker? Face them with prison?


    Maybe you don't see it that way - but maybe that's because you're not terminally ill and suffering.. or maybe because you have a personal objection to it (which is fine). But that's why they call it a personal objection - because it is something that applies to you, and not necessarily everybody else.

    Now I agree that healthcare professionals should not have to get involved with euthanasia if they don't want. That's their choice. But there are plenty of healthcare professionals who don't have a problem with consented euthanasia (that is to say, voluntary, competent, informed, coherent consent).

    A big part of caring for the patient is not only looking after their best interests but respecting their autonomy.

    IMO, banning euthanasia is not respecting patient autonomy. It is saying "you do not have the autonomy to die".
    You could even view it as refusing pain treatment.
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    The right to die is not protected by the right to life:

    ‘Article 2 is unconcerned with issues to do with the quality of living or what a person chooses to do with his or her life… [It cannot] be interpreted as conferring the diametrically opposite right, namely a right to die… [nor] the entitlement to choose death rather than life.’ (Pretty v UK (2002) 35 EHRR 1)'

    Euthanasia will never be an international law because there is no way it will become a custom, or any way that the majority of States will sign a treaty permitting such a law.

    You could possibly argue that the right to die is part of the right to a private life (Art 8 of the ECHR).

    It may, however, become domestic law (as in the Netherlands). Also, one thing that you have to remember is the UK government may or may not actually prosecute someone who helps someone with assisted suicide (in another country). Before Christmas the government was asked to figure out what sort of punishment one will receive if they do... their verdict should come within the next couple of months. However, I don't think it will be that harsh... maybe a fine.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Out of curiosity, would it be legal for a foreigner to go to Beglium for euthanasia? As I believe that Switzerland are considering moves to stop "euthanasia tourism", restricting it to Swiss citizens.

    As a national of the UK you can still be prosecuted under UK domestic law for assisting, by helping that person onto the plane. What the punishment you will receive is up for debate at the moment.
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    Your life is your property. You get to choose all the things you do in it, you get to choose all the things you don't. Think of it like milk. You're not going to keep milk that has gone off, you throw it out. If your life has gone bad, it's up to you if you want to 'throw it out'.

    Euthanasia is basically suicide.
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    (Original post by rinascimento)
    As a national of the UK you can still be prosecuted under UK domestic law for assisting, by helping that person onto the plane. What the punishment you will receive is up for debate at the moment.
    Yeah, Keir Starmer, the director of public prosecutions, has produced guidelines implying that virtually no one would be prosecuted in such circumstances. So I was more interested in Belgian law.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Yeah, Keir Starmer, the director of public prosecutions, has produced guidelines implying that virtually no one would be prosecuted in such circumstances. So I was more interested in Belgian law.
    Well, not unless the law is passed. When it is, then yes.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Out of curiosity, would it be legal for a foreigner to go to Beglium for euthanasia? As I believe that Switzerland are considering moves to stop "euthanasia tourism", restricting it to Swiss citizens.
    I have heard of foreigners who come to Belgium to undergo euthanasia, so apparently yes. As long as the doctor is Belgian and the procedure takes place in Belgium, I don't see why a UK citizen could get prosecuted.
 
 
 
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