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High achiever that needs to come to terms with not being naturally clever. watch

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    First year med who is a high achiever who believes he got there through hard work and hard work only. In terms of what I deem to be hard work: 1)Crammed like mad...like mad over the xmas hols for my Xmas exams- I nailed them. 2) Tries to understand a day's lecture by spending an hour reading up on the topic. Started doign this after I hated the whole cramming thing I did during xmas.

    Question: How can I come to terms with this?


    I say this as I seem to be pretty poor during tutorials getting the logic questions wrong when put on the spot but seems to be " smarter" when thinking on my own free from others.I am not instinctive and it demotivates me. I can understand and memorise but when I compare my problem solving ability without using acquired knowledge...it just isnt up to scratch.

    Problem: My success seems to confuse me as to whether or not I actually have an ability or not!?

    Why stay with something that I dont have a natural aptitude for?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    First year med who is a high achiever who believes he got there through hard work and hard work only. In terms of what I deem to be hard work: 1)Crammed like mad...like mad over the xmas hols for my Xmas exams- I nailed them. 2) Tries to understand a day's lecture by spending an hour reading up on the topic. Started doign this after I hated the whole cramming thing I did during xmas.

    Question: How can I come to terms with this?


    I say this as I seem to be pretty poor during tutorials getting the logic questions wrong when put on the spot but seems to be " smarter" when thinking on my own free from others.I am not instinctive and it demotivates me. I can understand and memorise but when I compare my problem solving ability without using acquired knowledge...it just isnt up to scratch.

    Problem: My success seems to confuse me as to whether or not I actually have an ability or not!?


    Why stay with something that I dont have a natural aptitude for?
    "First year med" - you got in, you have the ability. "got there through hard work and hard work only" - how else are you going to do it?! People, no matter how intelligent, aren't born with pre-programmed minds with miraculous insight into physiological processes or the human anatomy: they get there "through hard work and hard work only"! Hmm... sounds familiar, where have I heard this before?

    As for the tutorials vs free thinking; Could your being "put on the spot" be playing with your confidence levels, thus making you unable to fully concentrate on and engage with the question and therefore getting it wrong? Just a thought.

    Problem solving is a skill that can be practised and improved; get extra help/put in more work in this area. There are books/"brain training" excercises you could try, Do it regularly, but start small and develop your logical thinking gradually and you ought to see an improvement.

    Also, not everyone's career is a reflection of their 'natural' aptitude. What were your motivations to study medicine in the first place? To help others? Interest in science? Get back to basics with yourself and use these origional motivations + the opportunity your degree offers, to see yourself through the rough patches. Everyone has different weak areas. Dedication should pay off, so don't lose sight of your goal.

    Getting objective opinions should prove costructive; speak to your tutor/college counsellor about your thoughts. You have the ability; it's the belief in it that I think you should focus on finding.
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    I dont exactly get what you need to come to terms with, you do well, however clever you are that takes determination and hard work. Be happy with yourself, rather than finding fault.
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    LOL, tsr is funny.

    OP, at least you're not deluded?
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    Stop With Your Mental Masturbation!!
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    You can improve problem solving ability by practicing.
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    (Original post by /dev/null)
    Stop With Your Mental Masturbation!!
    LOL good way of putting it.

    OP, I've felt the same on a number of occassions and I havent even got into medschool. I hate people who get by on natural aptitude and brainpower. Im defo like you. I just have sit down and slog it out. But that shouldnt put you off or give you low self esteem in fact, I find it more mentally stimulating.
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    (Original post by moh2009)
    LOL good way of putting it.

    OP, I've felt the same on a number of occassions and I havent even got into medschool. I hate people who get by on natural aptitude and brainpower. Im defo like you. I just have sit down and slog it out. But that shouldnt put you off or give you low self esteem in fact, I find it more mentally stimulating.
    Isn't that how A levels work? Don't you have to work hard to get what you want out of life? Sounds to me like the OP has learnt everything he needs to, to succeed.

    :moon:
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    Ar well

    one day we will be sucked into a black hole and nobody will be around to care...

    Until then you'll have to make do with the insomniacs of tsr offering you with an insight into the nature of madness
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    Everyone has different kinds of intelligence. Some people are lateral thinkers whereas some are completely logical.

    The fact you got into med school should be enough to convince you have the right kind of ability.

    Play your strengths, which seems to be a good memory and organisational skills. The latter being something I'd kill to have personally.
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    You can actually learn the instinctive logical thinking as well, if you practise. Or practice. Whatever.
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    We all realise we're not as clever as we thought when moving from the rather closed environment of school to the more competitive environment of uni, but that doesn't mean you should give up, it just means you should work even harder and not necessarily care that you may not be the smartest person there.
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    (Original post by moh2009)
    LOL good way of putting it.

    OP, I've felt the same on a number of occassions and I havent even got into medschool. I hate people who get by on natural aptitude and brainpower. Im defo like you. I just have sit down and slog it out. But that shouldnt put you off or give you low self esteem in fact, I find it more mentally stimulating.
    That's a little harsh it's not like it's their fault they are gifted.
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    (Original post by daytona01)
    Ar well

    one day we will be sucked into a black hole and nobody will be around to care...

    Until then you'll have to make do with the insomniacs of tsr offering you with an insight into the nature of madness
    how do you know?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    First year med who is a high achiever who believes he got there through hard work and hard work only. In terms of what I deem to be hard work: 1)Crammed like mad...like mad over the xmas hols for my Xmas exams- I nailed them. 2) Tries to understand a day's lecture by spending an hour reading up on the topic. Started doign this after I hated the whole cramming thing I did during xmas.

    Question: How can I come to terms with this?


    I say this as I seem to be pretty poor during tutorials getting the logic questions wrong when put on the spot but seems to be " smarter" when thinking on my own free from others.I am not instinctive and it demotivates me. I can understand and memorise but when I compare my problem solving ability without using acquired knowledge...it just isnt up to scratch.

    Problem: My success seems to confuse me as to whether or not I actually have an ability or not!?

    Why stay with something that I dont have a natural aptitude for?
    You literally described me. It used to really bother me and I found it really difficult explaining to people who would tease about any achievements. I think that once you move into your career proper it will matter less to you, particularly if you end up being successful in it.
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    hardwork is overrated, but neccesary to excel, you did well and keep doing what you're doing if it serves you well.
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    I am not a med student yet :ninjagirl: but I do know what you mean. You start off at school/college being top of the year and then to uni as bottom of many insanely intelligent people.

    The jump from college to Uni is a great one (I graduated from biomed this year) but it shouldn't put you off. I guarantee a good proportion of your year are putting in those same hours to understand and process wth is going on.

    Developing the skills to get through tutorials, labs, PBLs (if you have them) and research papers WILL be tough but you will get used to them and know the methods you need to take.

    I started off swamped under with medical jargon, abbreviations and acronyms and now if I look at anything new it just clicks.

    Hang in there... you need to try to get where you want now doesn't mean you deserve it any less than the person who cruises through without trying or any more than the person who studies every min of the damn day.

    Who has a 'natural aptitude' to do med anyway??
    • #2
    #2

    I know how you feel - I have to put so much work in to do well now I'm at uni and I think that's the case with many people. However, it's important not to become despondant or lack self-confidence, even if certain skills like problem solving appear to come naturally to others - you obviously have the ability; perhaps you just need to work on your weaknesses.
    • #3
    #3

    What med school are you at OP, and what was your UKCAT?
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    Practice is the best way to improve...just as you get better at solving maths problems through practice.
 
 
 
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