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No Point Going To Uni watch

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    Hello, To tell you the truth there is no point in going to uni unless you wanna do medicine,law,engineering cos graduates are not getting the jobs as they use to. My friend graduated from LSE with a 2.1 in Law, last year and has been rejected by 25 companies, and same with other people I know, there all on working allowances of 40 pounds a week from gov.
    People think that just cos u got a degree u gona get a job but those days are gone. You need practical experience. Employers are keen to employ different people, so If you dont go to uni and start your own business up, they would be more interested, and more valued. Most of the subjects offered now a days can be studied in the library by reading books, eg computing, web site designing, languages.

    regards
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    (Original post by Perry)
    Hello, To tell you the truth there is no point in going to uni unless you wanna do medicine,law,engineering cos graduates are not getting the jobs as they use to. My friend graduated from LSE with a 2.1 in Law, last year and has been rejected by 25 companies, and same with other people I know, there all on working allowances of 40 pounds a week from gov.
    People think that just cos u got a degree u gona get a job but those days are gone. You need practical experience. Employers are keen to employ different people, so If you dont go to uni and start your own business up, they would be more interested, and more valued. Most of the subjects offered now a days can be studied in the library by reading books, eg computing, web site designing, languages.

    regards
    Yes. Your friend should consider working for a year non pay at a company firm. That way they will have a good chance for getting a paid job.
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    Hmm, totally disagree. It depends on your occupation, i may consider becoming a teacher, who knows...but a degree is essential - i'm too tired to argue, i'm going to go bed in a min, but your message is v. one sided...be a little open minded don't scream 'don't go to uni' because of some bad expierience...night.
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    (Original post by waiting2smile)
    Hmm, totally disagree. It depends on your occupation, i may consider becoming a teacher, who knows...but a degree is essential - i'm too tired to argue, i'm going to go bed in a min, but your message is v. one sided...be a little open minded don't scream 'don't go to uni' because of some bad expierience...night.
    Night.
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    Yes. Your friend should consider working for a year non pay at a company firm. That way they will have a good chance for getting a paid job.
    Wat a waste of time. His human you know he needs money for survival.
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    Well in my family including cousins of my generation all the people who went to university have all got good jobs and the ones that haven't are working in shops.

    If I didn't go to university I would be building PCs for £4.20 an hour hour now. The job I want to will pay more like £15 an hour. Nearly every job I have seen for my sector all say degree required.
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    Night.
    dont go!
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    What about learning for the sake of learning?

    Accumulating letters after your name is as least as meaningful, if not more meaningful, than accumulating lots of numbers in your bank account.
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    (Original post by Perry)
    Wat a waste of time. His human you know he needs money for survival.
    Yes...and he can still claim his money from the gov...unless your "friend" is a lazy **** and so does not deserve a job.
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    Yes...and he can still claim his money from the gov...unless your "friend" is a lazy **** and so does not deserve a job.
    yeah..... there is other people that need that money more
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    (Original post by fayzd)
    What about learning for the sake of learning?

    Accumulating letters after your name is as least as meaningful, if not more meaningful, than accumulating lots of numbers in your bank account.
    hehe yeah very good point. There is no way long term having a degree will hinder my career. If I am very unlucky when I graduate I may end up working some where crap at first but after a few months I am sure I will find somthing different.

    My mate works in a tax office and he has found that there he is finding hard to get promotion because the other peopel on the same grade as him have degrees and they are the ones that get the promotion.

    So even if you start work in a none graduate job having a degree will always help you increase your chances.
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    You are absolutely right I have a 2.1 and I know people with firsts who have been completely unable to get grad jobs. most of the people I know have done either teacher training or masters in the hope that it will improve their prospects. These days where the grad jobs are concerned unless you are from a top 20 uni with a high degree and extra curricular activities and work exp you dont stand much chance of getting a well paid job. There are too may grads and not enough jobs

    Also working for a year unpaid is a nice idea in theory in practise how could you afford it? Most top firms are in London accommodation is incredibly expensive. you could not afford to live even if you worked in a bar or something part time.
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    (Original post by viviki)

    Also working for a year unpaid is a nice idea in theory in practise how could you afford it? Most top firms are in London accommodation is incredibly expensive. you could not afford to live even if you worked in a bar or something part time.
    Yes, but the person is getting benefits. i.e. £40 per week. So might as well put it to good use and work to get some experience at least. Otherwise he will become another unemployed person.
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    (Original post by viviki)
    You are absolutely right I have a 2.1 and I know people with firsts who have been completely unable to get grad jobs. most of the people I know have done either teacher training or masters in the hope that it will improve their prospects. These days where the grad jobs are concerned unless you are from a top 20 uni with a high degree and extra curricular activities and work exp you dont stand much chance of getting a well paid job. There are too may grads and not enough jobs
    But what about my point where you could just get a normal none graduate and use the degree to get to help get promotion? Surely it is better to have a degree than not to have one.
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    Actually if you are getting benefits you cant work unpaid for a year, part of JSA is that you must prove that you are actively seeking employment and after a period you arent eligible anymore 26 weeks or so I think and then you would have to move onto income support if you were eligible for that, they would probably have suggested by that stage that you opt for lower paid work than the grad stuff you were applying for and you would end up taking a regular full time low paid job. You wouldnt be able to claim it if you are working part time because you cant get JSA or income support for that matter if you are working over 16 hours a week. YOu wouldnt really be able to pay rent and living cost on your benefit which would be low rate because you would be only entitled to income based JSA because you havent paid contributions and are therefore not entitled to conts JSA and maintain a comfortable standard of living. Even if you work less than 16 hours parttime they deduct the hours you work from your benefit. Also there are strict guidelines for appropriate voluntary work. If it is work for which it is reasonable to expect that you would be paid, they can deduct your jobseekers by the amount they would expect you to get paid if you were earning.
    I used to work for the Department for work and pensions so I know what I'm talking about even though this wasnt my spectialist area. You certainly couldnt live in London and work for free for a year and survive on benefits unless you already lived there. Or at least you could if you were prepared to live off bread and water and not go out for an entire year.

    You fall into the trap of having to temp to get off JSA and then you are that glad not to be temping that you will accept any low paid job as long as it is stable and you get paid sick leave and holidays. Yes you are not unemployed but you have no graduate job prospects you might as well have not done your degree. Out of everyone from a variety of unis I know that graduated in 2001 only about 2 people are earning over £16 grand a year and that is after 2 yrs work. One of those people is in insurance and the other is doing computing.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    But what about my point where you could just get a normal none graduate and use the degree to get to help get promotion? Surely it is better to have a degree than not to have one.
    In my experience it is ok if you have a really practical degree, if not it can actually hinder you. I've been rejected from jobs because they feel you are over qualified with a degree and wont stay. I've worked in the civil service and although the have a fast track grad scheme eligibility for entry is very limited, you are only really considered for promotion if you have worked in a variety of departments and gained a variety of on the job skills which would involve several years work.
    In some cases I do think it is actually better not to have a degree.
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    (Original post by viviki)
    Actually if you are getting benefits you cant work unpaid for a year, part of JSA is that you must prove that you are actively seeking employment and after a period you arent eligible anymore 26 weeks or so I think and then you would have to move onto income support if you were eligible for that, they would probably have suggested by that stage that you opt for lower paid work than the grad stuff you were applying for and you would end up taking a regular full time low paid job. You wouldnt be able to claim it if you are working part time because you cant get JSA or income support for that matter if you are working over 16 hours a week. YOu wouldnt really be able to pay rent and living cost on your benefit which would be low rate because you would be only entitled to income based JSA because you havent paid contributions and are therefore not entitled to conts JSA and maintain a comfortable standard of living. Even if you work less than 16 hours parttime they deduct the hours you work from your benefit. Also there are strict guidelines for appropriate voluntary work. If it is work for which it is reasonable to expect that you would be paid, they can deduct your jobseekers by the amount they would expect you to get paid if you were earning.
    I used to work for the Department for work and pensions so I know what I'm talking about even though this wasnt my spectialist area. You certainly couldnt live in London and work for free for a year and survive on benefits unless you already lived there. Or at least you could if you were prepared to live off bread and water and not go out for an entire year.
    O_o

    That is a real eyeopener. And the government wants more graduates onto the already flooded job markets...looks like we will be having a good educated poor class then...

    How much did you get paid when you went to work at the department?
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    (Original post by viviki)
    In my experience it is ok if you have a really practical degree, if not it can actually hinder you. I've been rejected from jobs because they feel you are over qualified with a degree and wont stay. I've worked in the civil service and although the have a fast track grad scheme eligibility for entry is very limited, you are only really considered for promotion if you have worked in a variety of departments and gained a variety of on the job skills which would involve several years work.
    In some cases I do think it is actually better not to have a degree.
    I suppose in my case its a bit different because it is a practical course the stuff I have learn't I can directly apply in a job. If I really can't get a job then I am sure an F.E college will have me, if not I will just have to setup my own business. It must look better if you wanted to setup a company directly related to what you have studied uni when you apply for loans etc.

    If I did't leave my job and go to college and university I will probably still be stuck in that awful job building PCs now.
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    I was on the second to lowest scale of pay which is 12 grand a year. They actually had temps there who were grads on 9 grand a year which was the grade below one of which had a masters.

    I thought it was pretty easy to get promotion but it really isnt it is all about how long you have been in the job, and on the job experience. There were people working in my dept all on under 18 grand who had done degrees such as history, law comp sci, psychology all who had come to work there on a temp basis and stayed because it is a stable job with good holiday and sick pay. I applied for their grad scheme before I started working there which goes in at the grade above what I was doing which is 17-18k I got to the third round which was interview before I got rejected, the competition was really stiff a lot of people with masters speaking several languages all with 2.1s.
    There was a fast track scheme within the department but as I recall it was only offered once a year or so and when I started I was 2 new and i got sick of it before I had been working there 2 years so didnt see it offered again.

    It is ok to do work exp if you live in a city and can be supported by your parents but if you live out in the sticks or dont have parents who can support you it isnt possible unless you are prepared to live on the breadline.
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    Its no body's fault but this thread is kind of depressing me and is the only reason I am still up.
 
 
 
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