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Is anemia regarded as a 'serious' illness? watch

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    From September 2009 to September 2010 I ended up losing a one and a half stone in weight, which made me practically under weight. Now I have put on enough weight to be regarded as healthy, however I had blood tests done and the reason for my weight lose was because I was always sleeping/ too tired to do anything (including to eat), due to anemia.

    I told someone who went to my sixth form and they told me that millions of people have iron deficiencies and it isn't a big deal. I feel so much better than I used to, but any one else who has/ had suffered from anemia regard it as quite serious? should I take precautions for the future? and if so how?!?
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    i believe u should.... anemia may just sound as an iron deficiency...but if you keep losing weight...it wouldnt be good for u...and ur lazy because your body isnt getting the required oxygen it needs...u should take iron supplements....
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    (Original post by ISS2508)
    From September 2009 to September 2010 I ended up losing a one and a half stone in weight, which made me practically under weight. Now I have put on enough weight to be regarded as healthy, however I had blood tests done and the reason for my weight lose was because I was always sleeping/ too tired to do anything (including to eat), due to anemia.

    I told someone who went to my sixth form and they told me that millions of people have iron deficiencies and it isn't a big deal. I feel so much better than I used to, but any one else who has/ had suffered from anemia regard it as quite serious? should I take precautions for the future? and if so how?!?
    It really depends on what's causing your iron deficiency anaemia. It could be due to blood loss (via an ulcer, intestinal worms or gynaecological disorders etc.) (possible), a dietary deficiency (unlikely) or a malabsorption syndrome, which means you inherently can't absorb iron efficiently from the foods you eat. (likely).

    Do you have any idea what the cause is? The treatment would vary with each one. I'm surprised you weren't told what was causing it. Unless you have an extremely poor diet, it's very unlikely it's actually a dietary deficiency.

    And to answer your question, no, iron deficiency is not serious. You'll often find people dying with iron deficiency anemia, but not from it.
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    (Original post by ISS2508)
    From September 2009 to September 2010 I ended up losing a one and a half stone in weight, which made me practically under weight. Now I have put on enough weight to be regarded as healthy, however I had blood tests done and the reason for my weight lose was because I was always sleeping/ too tired to do anything (including to eat), due to anemia.

    I told someone who went to my sixth form and they told me that millions of people have iron deficiencies and it isn't a big deal. I feel so much better than I used to, but any one else who has/ had suffered from anemia regard it as quite serious? should I take precautions for the future? and if so how?!?
    Anaemia is a just an iron deficiency and most doctors will just prescribe iron tablets but it can be quite serious if you become severely anaemic.
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    Anaemia is not a single disease - there are many types of anaemia, of which iron deficiency is only one type.
    Anaemias also vary hugely in severity from very mild anaemia (due to heavy periods for example), to life-threatening.
    Most people who are anaemic only have mild anaemia.
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    (Original post by ISS2508)
    I told someone who went to my sixth form and they told me that millions of people have iron deficiencies and it isn't a big deal. I feel so much better than I used to, but any one else who has/ had suffered from anemia regard it as quite serious? should I take precautions for the future? and if so how?!?
    Anaemia is not necassarily iron deficiency as everyone has said, and many of the other causes can be very serious! Fortunately, the commonest for is iron deficiency anaemia, and while not pleasant (at all) is easily treatable in the vast majority of cases. There can be nasty underlying problems with iron deficiency anaemia too, so it's well worth being checked out for, and if left untreated can leave you very ill indeed and precipitate other conditions. Most people with anaemia have nothing to worry about though.

    Precautions for the future would be iron supplements or even better, an iron rich diet. If you start to feel tired see if iron supplementation helps!
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    (Original post by aym3n)
    i believe u should.... anemia may just sound as an iron deficiency...but if you keep losing weight...it wouldnt be good for u...and ur lazy because your body isnt getting the required oxygen it needs...u should take iron supplements....
    Thank youuu

    (Original post by Misogynist)
    It really depends on what's causing your iron deficiency anaemia. It could be due to blood loss (via an ulcer, intestinal worms or gynaecological disorders etc.) (possible), a dietary deficiency (unlikely) or a malabsorption syndrome, which means you inherently can't absorb iron efficiently from the foods you eat. (likely).

    Do you have any idea what the cause is? The treatment would vary with each one. I'm surprised you weren't told what was causing it. Unless you have an extremely poor diet, it's very unlikely it's actually a dietary deficiency.

    And to answer your question, no, iron deficiency is not serious. You'll often find people dying with iron deficiency anemia, but not from it.
    I think it might be hereditary, ahhh okie thank youu

    (Original post by hippieglitter)
    Anaemia is a just an iron deficiency and most doctors will just prescribe iron tablets but it can be quite serious if you become severely anaemic.
    Yeh I had to take medication up to 3 times a day =/

    (Original post by jimbo139)
    Anaemia is not a single disease - there are many types of anaemia, of which iron deficiency is only one type.
    Anaemias also vary hugely in severity from very mild anaemia (due to heavy periods for example), to life-threatening.
    Most people who are anaemic only have mild anaemia.
    That would make sense, thankkyouu

    (Original post by hslt)
    Anaemia is not necassarily iron deficiency as everyone has said, and many of the other causes can be very serious! Fortunately, the commonest for is iron deficiency anaemia, and while not pleasant (at all) is easily treatable in the vast majority of cases. There can be nasty underlying problems with iron deficiency anaemia too, so it's well worth being checked out for, and if left untreated can leave you very ill indeed and precipitate other conditions. Most people with anaemia have nothing to worry about though.

    Precautions for the future would be iron supplements or even better, an iron rich diet. If you start to feel tired see if iron supplementation helps!
    Thank you for your comment!
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    (Original post by ISS2508)
    Thank youuu
    happy to help
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    (Original post by ISS2508)
    From September 2009 to September 2010 I ended up losing a one and a half stone in weight, which made me practically under weight. Now I have put on enough weight to be regarded as healthy, however I had blood tests done and the reason for my weight lose was because I was always sleeping/ too tired to do anything (including to eat), due to anemia.

    I told someone who went to my sixth form and they told me that millions of people have iron deficiencies and it isn't a big deal. I feel so much better than I used to, but any one else who has/ had suffered from anemia and taken the Folvite 5mg tablets? regard it as quite serious? should I take precautions for the future? and if so how?!?
    The following are the risks of the different types of Anemia

    Dangers of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    The mildest symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include irritability, tiredness, headache and difficulty focusing. As the anemia progresses, the symptoms become more pronounced. The biggest danger associated with moderate anemia is shortness of breath. Other symptoms include brittle nails and hair, pallor, a blue tinge to the whites of your eyes, dizziness and a sore tongue. Athletes are likely to experience reduced endurance with this type of anemia. In cases of advanced iron deficiency anemia, the body literally becomes starved for oxygen. The most serious dangers include organ failure, irregular heartbeat called arrhythmia and heart failure.







    Dangers of Folate Deficiency Anemia

    The symptoms of folate deficiency include fatigue, pallor, headache and sore tongue and mouth. A more serious deficiency may cause other cosmetic alterations including curling and graying of the hair and changes to skin pigmentation. Anemia is of particular concern with pregnant women because a folate deficiency can cause neural tube defects in her unborn child. Other dangers include a worsening of heart disease and heart failure and infertility.







    Dangers of B-12 Deficiency Anemia

    Mild symptoms associated with B-12 deficiency anemia include diarrhea or constipation, fatigue, shortness of breath, swollen red or bleeding gums, pallor, difficulty concentrating, lack of appetite and shortness of breath. The most serious danger of this deficiency is nerve damage. Signs of deficiency-related damage include numbness or tingling of the extremities, confusion, dementia, loss of balance and depression.







    Dietary Solutions

    A diverse, nutritious diet is essential for anemia prevention. Foods rich in folate include leafy, green vegetables and citrus fruits. Before and during pregnancy, women should take supplemental folic acid in addition to eating a healthy diet. Dietary sources of vitamin B-12 include meat, poultry, shellfish and dairy products. Lentils, peas, beans, red meat, poultry, soybeans, whole-grain bread, fortified cereal, some dried fruit and dark, leafy greens are all good sources of iron. Some anemias cannot be treated only with diet. If you've been diagnosed with a nutrient deficiency, work with your physician to ensure proper treatment.
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    (Original post by ISS2508)
    From September 2009 to September 2010 I ended up losing a one and a half stone in weight, which made me practically under weight. Now I have put on enough weight to be regarded as healthy, however I had blood tests done and the reason for my weight lose was because I was always sleeping/ too tired to do anything (including to eat), due to anemia.

    I told someone who went to my sixth form and they told me that millions of people have iron deficiencies and it isn't a big deal. I feel so much better than I used to, but any one else who has/ had suffered from anemia regard it as quite serious? should I take precautions for the future? and if so how?!?
    It isn't a big deal for most people but I do know of someone who was hospitalised for it

    As someone who's been there, done that, there's such a huge difference when you start taking iron pills. It feels so good not be in that hazy kind of mind that i used to
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    I'm closing this thread cos it's old and that gets confusing. If anybody wants to talk about something similar please feel free to start a new thread.
 
 
 
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