Javilionaire
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So I'm going to the University of Manchester in September to do Petroleum Engineering. By the end of the 4 year course I should have obtained an Meng. I'm aiming for a 1st and I was thinking about perhaps going to Cambridge or Imperial to do a PhD in Pet Eng after that.

I know this is a long way away, but is it worth doing the PhD? What will the salary differences be between a candidate with a PhD as opposed to one with just a Meng?

I heard 500k salaries are possible, but is this only with the PhD?

Thanks.
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Marc Fiorano
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Well, depends what you want to do with it. If you want to become an academic or a researcher/consultant for firms then it would be beneficial but otherwise you'd be better off just doing the MEng and getting out there applying it in the industry.

500k salaries are possible either way after 15-20 years experience if you play your cards right.

I know a guy who graduated 2 years ago (MSc from Imperial) and he earned something like 140k in his first year at a firm in Qatar. That's an extreme case obviously but just shows how lucrative it can be.
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KyraBloke
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(Original post by Marc Fiorano)
Well, depends what you want to do with it. If you want to become an academic or a researcher/consultant for firms then it would be beneficial but otherwise you'd be better off just doing the MEng and getting out there applying it in the industry.

500k salaries are possible either way after 15-20 years experience if you play your cards right.

I know a guy who graduated 2 years ago (MSc from Imperial) and he earned something like 140k in his first year at a firm in Qatar. That's an extreme case obviously but just shows how lucrative it can be.
The frick? half a million a year?
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usernonapplicable
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(Original post by Javilionaire)
So I'm going to the University of Manchester in September to do Petroleum Engineering. By the end of the 4 year course I should have obtained an Meng. I'm aiming for a 1st and I was thinking about perhaps going to Cambridge or Imperial to do a PhD in Pet Eng after that.

I know this is a long way away, but is it worth doing the PhD? What will the salary differences be between a candidate with a PhD as opposed to one with just a Meng?

I heard 500k salaries are possible, but is this only with the PhD?

Thanks.
Firstly, the rumoured 500k salaries are nothing more than wishful thinking. Although, I would love to be proved wrong, so please find me some evidence.

However for certain, you can earn an incredible salary in some middle eastern countries which I am aware from trusted sources, with nothing more than a MEng/MSc - although I wouldn't attempt to quantify it.

With regards to the idea of undertaking a PhD, and your general question of, 'is it worth it?', I think it may be so, providing you are committed and smart enough. I say this after observing a returning phd student at my undergrad university whom gained employment after both his undergrad/postgrad degree, then decided to do a phd to gain expertise in a very specific area; undoubtedly chosen by experience gained in the field.

Given the mammoth task of completing a PhD, the fact he had already gained 'professional engineer' status (USA), abandoned a lucrative job in Qatar and had no intention of carrying out academic work, one can only imagine the benefits were considered exceptional by postponing his career to undertake the PhD.

So, I can't answer your question directly, but perhaps you can draw some conclusions from the above yourself.
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Smack
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From what I've seen no, a PhD isn't worth it if you just want to make more money.

The people that make the most money are those who are offshore, and you don't need a PhD to go offshore. Most of these people started off as mechanical or electrical apprentices.
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Howard
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(Original post by Javilionaire)
So I'm going to the University of Manchester in September to do Petroleum Engineering. By the end of the 4 year course I should have obtained an Meng. I'm aiming for a 1st and I was thinking about perhaps going to Cambridge or Imperial to do a PhD in Pet Eng after that.

I know this is a long way away, but is it worth doing the PhD? What will the salary differences be between a candidate with a PhD as opposed to one with just a Meng?

I heard 500k salaries are possible, but is this only with the PhD?

Thanks.
You don't need a Phd to earn 500k. Take your MEng and go out to work. Become a CEng (or a PE or PEng) There's no need to spend another three years in a classroom losing valuable time when you could be getting actual industrial experience and earning big money.
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Howard
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(Original post by Smack)
From what I've seen no, a PhD isn't worth it if you just want to make more money.

The people that make the most money are those who are offshore, and you don't need a PhD to go offshore. Most of these people started off as mechanical or electrical apprentices.
True - mate of mine is a drill pusher in Iraq - he grosses $500k a year without breaking into a sweat.
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mucgoo
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You can get paid very well in compensation for working in the middle of nowhere basically.
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Javilionaire
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(Original post by Howard)
You don't need a Phd to earn 500k. Take your MEng and go out to work. Become a CEng (or a PE or PEng) There's no need to spend another three years in a classroom losing valuable time when you could be getting actual industrial experience and earning big money.
That's incredible. Well at the moment I will most probably just complete the Meng and then join the industry. However, I've got 5 years to make my decision so I guess I can take my time.

So what you're saying is, there's no point in doing the PhD as the salary difference won't be that great and I'll probably earn more money during the extra 3 years in the industry?
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Javilionaire
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(Original post by Howard)
x

(Original post by Smack)
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(Original post by usernonapplicable)
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Has anyone heard of a TV program called "License to Drill"? It's a new program on the discovery channel. How realistic is it? It's pretty much based around Petroleum Engineering.
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Aeschylus
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(Original post by Javilionaire)
So I'm going to the University of Manchester in September to do Petroleum Engineering. By the end of the 4 year course I should have obtained an Meng. I'm aiming for a 1st and I was thinking about perhaps going to Cambridge or Imperial to do a PhD in Pet Eng after that.

I know this is a long way away, but is it worth doing the PhD? What will the salary differences be between a candidate with a PhD as opposed to one with just a Meng?

I heard 500k salaries are possible, but is this only with the PhD?

Thanks.
Regardless of your degree choice, I would wait until you've got stuck into your undergrad before you think of doctorate study. A PHD is a serious commitment.
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Howard
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(Original post by Javilionaire)
That's incredible. Well at the moment I will most probably just complete the Meng and then join the industry. However, I've got 5 years to make my decision so I guess I can take my time.

So what you're saying is, there's no point in doing the PhD as the salary difference won't be that great and I'll probably earn more money during the extra 3 years in the industry?
A PHd isn't going to do much for you. Ask yourself - I am employer and I am employing someone to work in a refinery (or maybe advising in the construction of one) or perhaps someone to work as a geotech engineer in Brazil. Why would I need you to have a PHd? What would I need you to have "Dr" in front of your name for? What benefit would that bring me an an employer?

The wheels of industry (petrochem, oil, gas, mining etc) revolve because these industries are managed by people who are well educated and experienced - Chartered/Professional Engineers who have been around the track a few times - not because they are full of egg heads. A PHd is great if you want a personal challenge or if you want a life in academics (paying a fraction of what you could earn in industry to teach)
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Smack
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(Original post by Javilionaire)
Has anyone heard of a TV program called "License to Drill"? It's a new program on the discovery channel. How realistic is it? It's pretty much based around Petroleum Engineering.
I haven't heard of it before, but it seems to be more based around drilling rather than petroleum. Petroleum is primarily about dealing with reservoirs and the most efficient way to extract the hydrocarbons from them. It's more of a collar and tie in a a head office type job than an onsite one.

Edit: while I remember, at the last oil & gas exhibition I was at I briefly spoke to someone who had a PhD and was in the petroleum engineering side of things... but her PhD was actually in astrophysics. It's actually quite common for people at the PhD level to have them in more theoretical subjects that have a stronger grounding in maths, when a position needs filled that requires such a high level of maths. The moral of the story is that engineering is a fundamentally practical subject and if you truly want to maximise your earnings then you shouldn't stick around in academia for too long.
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Dukeofwembley
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dont listen to most of these idiots, phd's in petroleum engineering is funded by supernationals and other firms, and so they have a direct interest in outcome...
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