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    So I'm applying for uni in September and currently in trying to decide between math and physics as a subject. I think if I chose physics I would either do astro- or theoretical. So what are tge pros, cons, of all 3 subjects and which would you recommend?
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    You should basically be able to do them all in one degree? Try a joint degree? Or go to scotland and try them out in your first year
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    (Original post by Aph)
    So I'm applying for uni in September and currently in trying to decide between math and physics as a subject. I think if I chose physics I would either do astro- or theoretical. So what are tge pros, cons, of all 3 subjects and which would you recommend?
    Astro - lots of facts and figures to memorise, I personally did terribly in this because im more into deriving equations and solving mathematical problems.
    Theoretical - very difficult maths, i'd say more difficult than a straight maths degree. but more interesting than maths (I think) as its applied
    Maths - is exactly what it says on the tin, proofs, complex problems

    so in short if you're very good at maths and interested in applying maths to real life (and theoretical) phenomenon go for theoretical, if you want pure maths do straight maths, if you are good at memorising how things work and are interested in astro, then go for astro.
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    (Original post by UniBrah)
    Astro - lots of facts and figures to memorise, I personally did terribly in this because im more into deriving equations and solving mathematical problems.
    Theoretical - very difficult maths, i'd say more difficult than a straight maths degree. but more interesting than maths (I think) as its applied
    Maths - is exactly what it says on the tin, proofs, complex problems

    so in short if you're very good at maths and interested in applying maths to real life (and theoretical) phenomenon go for theoretical, if you want pure maths do straight maths, if you are good at memorising how things work and are interested in astro, then go for astro.
    Am I right in thinking that theoretical involves quantem? Or is that different all together?

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    (Original post by Aph)
    Am I right in thinking that theoretical involves quantem? Or is that different all together?

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    It would depend on the modules your chosen University offers, for example Leeds Uni:

    http://webprod3.leeds.ac.uk/banner/d...P=BS-PHYS%2FTP

    Which doesn't have specific quantum modules to Theoretical Physics, BUT almost all Universities offer Quantum Modules as one of their core modules. i.e. you have to take them.

    More complex Quantum Theory would usually come after your degree at postgrad level.

    To answer your question more specifically no, theoretical physics does not involve very much quantum mechanics directly. in my experience.
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    (Original post by UniBrah)
    It would depend on the modules your chosen University offers, for example Leeds Uni:

    http://webprod3.leeds.ac.uk/banner/d...P=BS-PHYS%2FTP

    Which doesn't have specific quantum modules to Theoretical Physics, BUT almost all Universities offer Quantum Modules as one of their core modules. i.e. you have to take them.

    More complex Quantum Theory would usually come after your degree at postgrad level.

    To answer your question more specifically no, theoretical physics does not involve very much quantum mechanics directly. in my experience.
    Thank you

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