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    Hi, I've just graduated with a 2.1 in electrical and electronic engineering from a Russell Group university and I really want to do a masters in finance/economics. I've heard that business schools accept engineers all the time but I'm wondering which universities are worth a applying to? I didn't do very well in my first 2 and half years at university but in my final semester I consistently scored some of the highest marks in the class and got over 70% in all my final modules. On top of my uni exams and dissertation, I also re-sat my maths and physics A-levels which shows just how much effort I have been putting in.

    I applied to do economics and finance at Durham but they recently rejected me on that course although they have encouraged me to apply for an MSc in Management (Finance) which I have done. I'm assuming they think jumping into an economics masters might be too much for me. I'm not too sure I want to do this course though as it doesn't seem like a "pure" course as it were.

    I was also looking at MBA's but the average age for those seems to be mid-20's and they seem to require several years of in field experience.

    I'd honestly like to apply to Warwick, St Andrews, Edinburgh, UCL, Imperial(?) and perhaps some others as time is of the essence and I'd like to increase my chances. I was thinking of applying to the US but applications for those closed a long time ago.

    The thing is I have friends on my course who are going to Ivy League unis or banks in London and I scored higher marks than them in my final semester coursework and exams, so I know I'm a worthy student which gives me confidence in applying.

    Any tips/thoughts?

    Thanks
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    The question PG admissions people will be asking themselves is 'does this person have enough underpinning knowledge at an undergraduate level in the subject to be successful in the more specialised nature of a postgraduate course'. You need to be able to show them you do. Can you do that?

    As you identified, ignore MBAs for now. MSc Management courses are broad and unlikely to offer you much in the way of quantitative subjects it sounds like you're wanting.

    Why not go into work first?
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    The question PG admissions people will be asking themselves is 'does this person have enough underpinning knowledge at an undergraduate level in the subject to be successful in the more specialised nature of a postgraduate course'. You need to be able to show them you do. Can you do that?

    As you identified, ignore MBAs for now. MSc Management courses are broad and unlikely to offer you much in the way of quantitative subjects it sounds like you're wanting.

    Why not go into work first?
    Hi Duncan,

    Yeah I noticed that for economics, universities generally require maths or economics bachelors degrees but for finance they state engineering as one of their requirements which is where I'm going to focus my efforts.

    I have received an offer for an MSc in Management (Finance) from Durham so I'm considering it a bit more. It does contain modules such as business economics and fundamentals of finance so it could be a decent level for me but like you said, it's most probably quite broad. Going to Durham would be an experience in its own right though I think.

    I missed the intake for a lot of companies for this year so I'd have to apply for next year in October and November of this year which would mean I'd have a year of doing nothing which would be quite annoying. Not an ideal situation but I'd prefer not to have a year out.

    I guess I'm just going to have to spam as many applications as possible in the hope that some top uni gives me a place.
 
 
 
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