Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am hoping to study English Lit and French at university but was also wondering the career prospects??? Besides the obvious teaching
    • Very Important Poster
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    Welcome Squad
    A friend of mine did Italian and English at uni and is now a translator on a world class cruise ship. I think that sounds awesome.. Great benefits too.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ameliamcclune)
    I am hoping to study English Lit and French at university but was also wondering the career prospects??? Besides the obvious teaching
    The thing with most degrees is that they don't lead to a particular career, they serve as a way of ticking off the 'degree requirement' box for a whole range of careers, however to actually get a job you need to offer a complete package including work experience and a strong application. You would be able to apply for a whole range of jobs in business, HR, the charity sector, finance, accountancy (no you don't need an accountancy degree), translation/interpretation, civil service and more I'm sure I've left out.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ameliamcclune)
    I am hoping to study English Lit and French at university but was also wondering the career prospects??? Besides the obvious teaching
    There are an extraordinary range of graduate jobs which don't require a particular academic background—often, employers want to know that you have a degree with a 2.1 or a first, as it shows you can work at something for a while, and they'd like you to have that degree from a decent university, but they're not very interested in what exactly you studied or where you studied it. So there's a huge range of things you could be doing with an English & French degree—my first job after my degree in English was in medical e-learning.

    If you come out of your degree with decent French you may find a whole extra set of opportunities. As a country we produce an embarrassingly small number of graduates with good foreign language abilities and there's definitely a need for those skills in business and government.

    So the possibilities are kind of too numerous to try listing them, and you need to think yourself about which fields you might like to work in. What can be more important than the topic of your degree is your ability to show that you're interested in whatever field(s) you wind up applying in. This makes getting some kind of experience on your CV during your degree very useful—summer jobs, internships, university societies and so on can be a big advantage. It can help to identify one or two fields you might be interested in early on and see if you can get any opportunities in those.

    The disadvantage of doing a non-vocational degree is that you don't get a ready-made and explicit system of career progression on graduating. But the related advantages are the freedom to define, with a little preparation and thought, a career that you personally want, and kind of flexibility that readies you for putting in applications for graduate posts in a range of fields at once if necessary.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you so much, very useful reading this!
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by QHF)
    There are an extraordinary range of graduate jobs which don't require a particular academic background—often, employers want to know that you have a degree with a 2.1 or a first, as it shows you can work at something for a while, and they'd like you to have that degree from a decent university, but they're not very interested in what exactly you studied or where you studied it. So there's a huge range of things you could be doing with an English & French degree—my first job after my degree in English was in medical e-learning.

    If you come out of your degree with decent French you may find a whole extra set of opportunities. As a country we produce an embarrassingly small number of graduates with good foreign language abilities and there's definitely a need for those skills in business and government.

    So the possibilities are kind of too numerous to try listing them, and you need to think yourself about which fields you might like to work in. What can be more important than the topic of your degree is your ability to show that you're interested in whatever field(s) you wind up applying in. This makes getting some kind of experience on your CV during your degree very useful—summer jobs, internships, university societies and so on can be a big advantage. It can help to identify one or two fields you might be interested in early on and see if you can get any opportunities in those.

    The disadvantage of doing a non-vocational degree is that you don't get a ready-made and explicit system of career progression on graduating. But the related advantages are the freedom to define, with a little preparation and thought, a career that you personally want, and kind of flexibility that readies you for putting in applications for graduate posts in a range of fields at once if necessary.
    This is an excellent post and should be read by a lot of people going into (or thinking of going into) nonvocational degrees on this site

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.