Zainab_Shah_
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I've got a law test coming up and I have no idea how to structure my answers! I tried looking online for something but after ten minutes I gave up since I couldn't find anything. I know in GCSE there were techniques such as PEEL or PETAL so I was wondering if there's any like that for this?
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Knaz2020
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Hi,

For problem questions, you can pretty much use the following approach, it worked very well for me:

- Analyse the area of law the question relates to
- Pick out any problem elements, for example if it is testing your knowledge on non fatal offences, which offence is it likely to be?
- Discuss these problem elements, why there is an issue in relation to the particular offence? why is the defendant/claimant in the wrong?
- Apply factual legal knowledge to the scenario, what does the law say on this matter? what has D/C done which goes against this? Back this up with case law precedent, this will be your Application, which will form the bulk of your answer as you will be reasoning your points.
- Conclude, what is likely to happen as a result, are there any defences? if so discuss and back up with case law.

To summarise:
- Pick out problem elements
- Discuss what the problem elements actually are
- Apply learnt legal knowledge on the matter to the scenario, backing this up with case law
- Conclude (mention any potential defences if applicable)

Hope that helps!
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shortgirl96
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Hello

Problem questions expect you to have a good level of written communication skills. You can set your answer out like this for instance-

A written law analysis pertaining to whatever the question is asking
A short paragraph on some obvious problem elements you have spotted
A paragraph solely focusing on a few different creative ways to apply law theory to your advantage.
A short conclusion at the end. Talk about the results and what you learned. Here you can also reference any law books or helpful articles which you have read. Refer back to any case studies. Use your class notes.

I hope this is useful.
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ROTL94
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I didn't do A Level law but I do it at undergraduate and IDK but I assume the structure is the same. So, what you need to be using is the IRAC formula. Which means Isuue - statement of the legal issue and what area of the law it relates to such as non fatal offences against the person, in criminal law for instance. Rule - this is where you state what case law and statutes may be relevant to the legal issue at hand. Analysis - This is where you establish how much the cases and statutes that you previously identified apply to the legal problem and if there's an issue of two conflicting rulings like one from the CoA and one from the HoL you need to say that the decision is the HoL case is likely to be used as precedent because the decisions reached in the higher courts are binding on lower courts. Conclusion - Just restate the issue and the final answer based on your analysis above.
Last edited by ROTL94; 3 months ago
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