rf266
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can someone please explain the difference between reliability of an experiment/ data/ theory vs the validity in psychology, this is something I always get confused with, thanks
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Arden University
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(Original post by rf266)
can someone please explain the difference between reliability of an experiment/ data/ theory vs the validity in psychology, this is something I always get confused with, thanks
Hi @rf266

I'm currently doing an MSc in Psychology conversion course at Arden University. I've found this online for you which explains it nicely

https://www.scribbr.com/methodology/...y-vs-validity/

If you are interested in pursuing psychology beyond GCSE, the A level option is always a good route, as is an Access to HE Social Sciences course if you are 19+

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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emma543
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(Original post by rf266)
can someone please explain the difference between reliability of an experiment/ data/ theory vs the validity in psychology, this is something I always get confused with, thanks
Reliability: consistency in measurement

You can test it by doing test-retest reliability or inter-rater reliability. Let me give you an example...

Test-retest---> If you are making a diagnosis for example you should make the same diagnosis regardless of when it was e.g. you should make the same diagnosis now as you did yesterday.

Inter-rater reliability ---> If you had two people diagnosing the same person they should both reach the same diagnosis- this suggests the diagnosis is reliable

Validity: how legitimate something is as an explanation of behaviour

There are two types:

Internal validity: whether the effects observed in the experiment were a consequence of the manipulation of the independent variable

External validity: whether you can generalise the results of the study
This also concerns:
1) Ecological validity- the place where the research was conducted. Can you generalise the research setting to everyday life? If the setting was a laboratory then it's won't be generalisable.
2) Population validity- the people who are studied. Can you generalise the findings to all people? If the sample is just of students then you can't.
3) Historical validity- the historical period. Can the findings of the study in the 1950s be applied today?
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