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Which uni is best for law in Uk?

I am thinking of applying for law at LSE but I’m also wondering in general which other universities in the uk are good for law including their courses and the way they teach the qualification.

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Oxbridge, KCL, UCL, LSE, Cardiff Uni, Uni of Edinburgh, Uni of Sussex, De Montfort Uni and Durham Uni.
There is no 'best' Uni for Law - you dont come out of any Uni with a barcode of your forehead that instantly guarantees you a great career or lifeling happiiness. And no, LSE or 'London' does not give you any astonishing advantage over anyone who went to any other Uni with a string reputation for Law.

Yes, there are Unis that ask for A* grades, but remember that doesnt mean that you will like the course or enjoy being at that Uni anymore than any other. As with all UCAS applications, the advice is to have 5 choices with a range of grade requirements so that you spread the risk of 'no offer' and you have lower grade offers to use an Insurance choice.

And btw, LSE has a student population that is 67% overseas students, the majority of them Chinese.
There is nothing wrong with this of course, but it may impact in your 'student exoerience'.
Reply 3
Original post by McGinger
There is no 'best' Uni for Law - you dont come out of any Uni with a barcode of your forehead that instantly guarantees you a great career or lifeling happiiness. And no, LSE or 'London' does not give you any astonishing advantage over anyone who went to any other Uni with a string reputation for Law.

Yes, there are Unis that ask for A* grades, but remember that doesnt mean that you will like the course or enjoy being at that Uni anymore than any other. As with all UCAS applications, the advice is to have 5 choices with a range of grade requirements so that you spread the risk of 'no offer' and you have lower grade offers to use an Insurance choice.

And btw, LSE has a student population that is 67% overseas students, the majority of them Chinese.
There is nothing wrong with this of course, but it may impact in your 'student exoerience'.


Thank you!
Reply 4
Original post by londonmyst
Oxbridge, KCL, UCL, LSE, Cardiff Uni, Uni of Edinburgh, Uni of Sussex, De Montfort Uni and Durham Uni.


Thanks
Original post by londonmyst
Oxbridge, KCL, UCL, LSE, Cardiff Uni, Uni of Edinburgh, Uni of Sussex, De Montfort Uni and Durham Uni.


Purely your view - and quite why you think DMU is 'good' for Law escapes me - its not 'good' for any subject.
Oxbridge, Durham, UCL, KCL are the top universities for Law.
Original post by Itsalexx
Thanks


There really isnt a best school. Different law schools have students working in different areas. In the South West Bristol and Exeter are extremely strong. In London the London universities have the more students employed. In the North West Manchester is very strong.
Original post by ikarus03
Oxbridge, Durham, UCL, KCL are the top universities for Law.


Please define 'top' - and how you measure this.
Original post by McGinger
Please define 'top' - and how you measure this.


Rankings, student satisfaction, career prospects, etc.
Just to give you another viewpoint
"For four consecutive years, Law at Oxford Brookes has ranked as an elite subject in the top 50 world universities that are under 50 fifty years old (QS rankings, 2021)." https://www.lawcabs.ac.uk/institution/oxford-brookes-university ie. all Unis will quote you stats and league tablesthat make them look good.
Original post by londonmyst
Oxbridge, KCL, UCL, LSE, Cardiff Uni, Uni of Edinburgh, Uni of Sussex, De Montfort Uni and Durham Uni.


Is DMU included in error?
Original post by ROTL94 3
Is DMU included in error?

No.
Original post by Itsalexx
I am thinking of applying for law at LSE but I’m also wondering in general which other universities in the uk are good for law including their courses and the way they teach the qualification.


Beyond Oxbridge, it would be LSE, UCL, King's, Durham, Bristol, Queen Mary, and a couple of others that have escaped my mind.

Keep in mind that each university can be assessed on multiple metrics and that these can often point you in different directions. There is no point in telling an urban dwelling child of the city to study in Durham for three years. There are also complex trade-offs in terms of tuition versus career prospects - how does one weigh up the slightly lower student satisfaction scores at the likes of LSE and King's against the fact that both universities' graduates do seem to be very switched on and go on to have (on aggregate) good starts to their careers?
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by swanseajack1
There really isnt a best school. Different law schools have students working in different areas. In the South West Bristol and Exeter are extremely strong. In London the London universities have the more students employed. In the North West Manchester is very strong.

This is a very important point and it cuts both ways. On the one hand, I was impressed by how many ties to local employers (in the south/south west) the University of Exeter had. It made it very easy for students to get to speak to recruiters and lawyers who were based in Bristol, Cardiff, Southampton, Cheltenham and Exeter itself. This is a big selling point for local students who want to stay in the region. On the other hand, Exeter undoubtedly got less graduate recruitment attention and presence from leading London law firms - especially those with smaller intakes and budgets - than the likes of Oxbridge, Durham and even Bristol/Nottingham.

So there would be a risk that an otherwise promising young candidate would be 'blown off course' by virtue of the employers they were exposed to and the preferences of their classmates and maybe not put the same effort into pursuing a law career in London (or outside the south/south west).
(edited 1 year ago)
Certain elite Law institutions require you to sit the LNAT. Which is a Law aptitude test on your critical thinking so not actually your knowledge on the Law. Kings-Durham-SOAS -UCL- Bristol-Nottingham-Cambridge-Glasgow-Oxford & LSE.

However if you are looking to take Law with a Minor (Sub category) for example Business Management, Politics, Criminology, Sociology, American Law, Psychology even Philosophy or Criminal Justice.
Best to look at the modules and requirements that are to suit.

If it is for entry 2023 you will need to sit and submit before mid December 2022. The Lawyers Portal is a good base for information on Universities. I decided on Lancaster University even though I sat LNAT last November with score of 21. I have friends that went to University of Law in London & Manchester and another currently at City, University of London who also looked at The college of Humanities (North Eastern University).

Each institution have an average to achieve on the LNAT which Kings is 24 I believe.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by WolfWhisperer

If it is for entry 2023 you will need to sit and submit before mid December 2022.


The UCAS deadline is in the middle of January.
The best is Oxbridge and their deadline is about September or something - earlier than anywhere else. Also although UCAS has a deadline elsewhere of January most good schools get the applications in earlier by about October so people can concentrate on A level work.

The harder the grade requirements the better the place - it is a fairly simply but a pure market test.
Original post by 17Student17


The harder the grade requirements the better the place - it is a fairly simply but a pure market test.



Total nonsense.

Its all about marketing and what is know as 'positioning'.
Unis will never ask for lower grades than the Unis they see as their parallel or competition for that subject.
I've had long arguements with academics about changng grade requirements,and it always hinges on the impact on reputation - even if they cant fill the course because the current offer is high to attact enough applicants, they wil not lower the grade requirements.

It has absoloutely nothing to do witth the 'qualifty' of the course - however you think you can measure that.

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