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What subjects are the MOST important for environmental science?

I'm currently deciding which A-levels to pick. On google and through UCAS the general idea I'm getting is that if you want to do environmental sciences at Universities you need maths, biology and geography (mainly). If I could only take two of these, which two would be the best to take? Or if any other options are valued higher by universities, what are they?
Original post by Ozziecar
I'm currently deciding which A-levels to pick. On google and through UCAS the general idea I'm getting is that if you want to do environmental sciences at Universities you need maths, biology and geography (mainly). If I could only take two of these, which two would be the best to take? Or if any other options are valued higher by universities, what are they?

You need to check the individual university's entrance requirement. I suspect it would be Biology and Geography but in some cases Chemistry might be useful dependent on the type of Environmental Science you are looking at.
Here is what Bangor says and they are well known for this type of course. It doesnt matter as long as you have one of these
Including grade C in a science subject at A2 level (e.g. Biology, Geography, Geology, Environmental Sciences/Studies, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Economics, Statistics, Psychology): General Studies and Key Skills not accepted.
This is what Exeter wants

Grade B in one of the following subjects required: Biology/Human Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Design and Technology, Economics, Electronics, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geology, Life and Health Sciences (Double Award only), Marine Science, Maths/Pure Maths/Further Maths, Nutrition and Food Science, Physical Education, Physics, Psychology, Science (applied), Sport Science, Statistics.
Original post by Ozziecar
I'm currently deciding which A-levels to pick. On google and through UCAS the general idea I'm getting is that if you want to do environmental sciences at Universities you need maths, biology and geography (mainly). If I could only take two of these, which two would be the best to take? Or if any other options are valued higher by universities, what are they?


It really depends on where you think your future interest might lie (for example, ecology/conservation, environmental chemistry/toxicology, etc). Biology, geography and chemistry are key subjects. Maths is too but mainly in terms of statistical techniques that are usually covered in biology and geography A levels. If you look at the Lancaster course, students are required to take specific modules if they don't take some subjects at A level.

https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/environmental-science-bsc-hons-f750/#course-entry
Original post by Ozziecar
I'm currently deciding which A-levels to pick. On google and through UCAS the general idea I'm getting is that if you want to do environmental sciences at Universities you need maths, biology and geography (mainly). If I could only take two of these, which two would be the best to take? Or if any other options are valued higher by universities, what are they?


Hi there,

I have just graduated with a BSc in Natural Sciences from Lancaster University and studied some environmental sciences within it so I thought I could maybe help out with this. As a lot of other people have said, it really depends on the individual course/university as to which will be required for the course. I know at Lancaster that the grade requirements for environmental science are ABB with A level grade B in one science from the following; Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Human Biology, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology. So you would be covered no matter which you took.

If you wanted to carry on studying maths or biology alongside Environmental Science, Natural Sciences could be a good option too. Natural Sciences degrees tend to vary by university, so it's definitely worth having a look around to see what course is right for you. At Lancaster, the degree is very flexible, you can choose 3 pathways out of a possible 21. The subjects range from geography, microbiology, maths, ecology and conservation, environmental science, earth sciences, and more, so there are many different possible combinations! The complete list of different pathways is in the brochure which can be found here - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/ .

In terms of which would be best to take out of those three options, neither biology nor geography are actually required for any of the Natural Sciences pathways. Maths is a requirement for a few of the pathways including the Maths pathway. Otherwise, you are required to have studied at least two science subjects from the following; Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Information Technology, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology. So again you would be covered any which way! Honestly the best advice I can give is to choose the subjects that you most enjoy. As long as you cover the necessary subjects for the degree you want to apply for, this will mean that you get the most from the course and will probably lead to you finding the content more enjoyable.

Good luck with your A levels, and if you have any more questions feel free to ask :smile:

- Bethan (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)
Reply 6
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi there,

I have just graduated with a BSc in Natural Sciences from Lancaster University and studied some environmental sciences within it so I thought I could maybe help out with this. As a lot of other people have said, it really depends on the individual course/university as to which will be required for the course. I know at Lancaster that the grade requirements for environmental science are ABB with A level grade B in one science from the following; Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Human Biology, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology. So you would be covered no matter which you took.

If you wanted to carry on studying maths or biology alongside Environmental Science, Natural Sciences could be a good option too. Natural Sciences degrees tend to vary by university, so it's definitely worth having a look around to see what course is right for you. At Lancaster, the degree is very flexible, you can choose 3 pathways out of a possible 21. The subjects range from geography, microbiology, maths, ecology and conservation, environmental science, earth sciences, and more, so there are many different possible combinations! The complete list of different pathways is in the brochure which can be found here - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/ .

In terms of which would be best to take out of those three options, neither biology nor geography are actually required for any of the Natural Sciences pathways. Maths is a requirement for a few of the pathways including the Maths pathway. Otherwise, you are required to have studied at least two science subjects from the following; Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Information Technology, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology. So again you would be covered any which way! Honestly the best advice I can give is to choose the subjects that you most enjoy. As long as you cover the necessary subjects for the degree you want to apply for, this will mean that you get the most from the course and will probably lead to you finding the content more enjoyable.

Good luck with your A levels, and if you have any more questions feel free to ask :smile:

- Bethan (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)


Thanks for such a detailed response, this was really helpful!
Probably biology geog chemistry physics double award subjects like that

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