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Homeschool/home ed day in the life

I want to changed my timetable bc it's not really working anymore, so, I'm curious about other people's homeschoold/home ed schedule/timetable
My kids' timetables change all the time. Depends on the child, the year, and the time of year (i.e. if it's close to exam season or not).

How old are you? Are you booked in for any upcoming exams?

Edit: just realised this is in the A Level section. Are you self studying 3 A Levels?
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 2
Do you know when your most productive? I know that for me waking up early (like before 9) is a big help for how much work im going to get done that day. So i try do work between 8am and about 3-4pm with lunch and breaks in between, and i make a list of everything i want to get done and use a timer to do those tasks (i use an app called MinimaList). From either 3 or 4 depending how slow i was that day in doing work and how well i concentrated, i just spend time to relax until dinner between 6-7, then after i do a bit more work (usually revising/making revision sources/practicing exam questions/doing some reading for english) until about 9 and then chill for the rest of the night until i go to bed (:

Honeslty though its whatever works for you, and in 100% honesty i dont always manage to follow my own schedule sometimes i get no where near as much work as i'd want to, so i may spend much longer trying to finish it or try finish on weekends so i dont fall behind, or i wake up later than i'd like to and it means not being as productive throughout the day or going to bed later trying to finish what i was meant to do in that time i was sleeping. BUT, i find using lists really helpful, and breaking down tasks so its not just something like 'English 9-10, Sociology 10-11' etc. I find doing something like 'English spend 10 minutes reading chapter 1-3, spend 20 minutes annotating of that one book for that day, do the same thing for the next couple between 9-10 with breaks, 10-11 spend 10 minutes reading this chapter of the textbook, spend so long writing the notes from that chapter, spend 15 minutes summorising all those notes onto an A4 word document so you've got a summary sheet (helps with revision)' - just something like that (but obviously in notes form as a list, just breaking down the topic down so that your not tackling 'English' for so many hours a day, your tackling smaller topics in english so it doesnt seem as much and such an overwhelming task)

Its totally okay to change your schedule if its not working! Have you tried changing environements too? Like for example if you always do your work in your room at a desk have you tried doing work in a different room in your house? Like downstairs at a dinner table? Or doing work outside your house in a library or cafe?
Reply 3
Original post by PinkMobilePhone
My kids' timetables change all the time. Depends on the child, the year, and the time of year (i.e. if it's close to exam season or not).

How old are you? Are you booked in for any upcoming exams?

Edit: just realised this is in the A Level section. Are you self studying 3 A Levels?

I'm planning to do my AS next year in the June exam series. And yes, I am self studying 3 A levels. But I don't really know a good system to do that. So far, I've just been reading the textbook, making flashcards, and doing the pratice questions, and end of chapter exams in the textbook. And I feel like that's not a very good system, so yeah
Reply 4
Original post by loulai_
Do you know when your most productive? I know that for me waking up early (like before 9) is a big help for how much work im going to get done that day. So i try do work between 8am and about 3-4pm with lunch and breaks in between, and i make a list of everything i want to get done and use a timer to do those tasks (i use an app called MinimaList). From either 3 or 4 depending how slow i was that day in doing work and how well i concentrated, i just spend time to relax until dinner between 6-7, then after i do a bit more work (usually revising/making revision sources/practicing exam questions/doing some reading for english) until about 9 and then chill for the rest of the night until i go to bed (:

Honeslty though its whatever works for you, and in 100% honesty i dont always manage to follow my own schedule sometimes i get no where near as much work as i'd want to, so i may spend much longer trying to finish it or try finish on weekends so i dont fall behind, or i wake up later than i'd like to and it means not being as productive throughout the day or going to bed later trying to finish what i was meant to do in that time i was sleeping. BUT, i find using lists really helpful, and breaking down tasks so its not just something like 'English 9-10, Sociology 10-11' etc. I find doing something like 'English spend 10 minutes reading chapter 1-3, spend 20 minutes annotating of that one book for that day, do the same thing for the next couple between 9-10 with breaks, 10-11 spend 10 minutes reading this chapter of the textbook, spend so long writing the notes from that chapter, spend 15 minutes summorising all those notes onto an A4 word document so you've got a summary sheet (helps with revision)' - just something like that (but obviously in notes form as a list, just breaking down the topic down so that your not tackling 'English' for so many hours a day, your tackling smaller topics in english so it doesnt seem as much and such an overwhelming task)

Its totally okay to change your schedule if its not working! Have you tried changing environements too? Like for example if you always do your work in your room at a desk have you tried doing work in a different room in your house? Like downstairs at a dinner table? Or doing work outside your house in a library or cafe?

I'm most productive around 1 - 2 hours after I wake up (I wake up at around 10 every day, but sometimes I wake up later or earlier than that)

Yes, I've tried changing environments, but it doesn't work very well for me

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