The Student Room Group

Dropping out of uni for a new city?

I'm looking for some advice. I currently study Human Biology at Manchester Met, I am in first year and have lived in greater Manchester all my life (25 minutes from the centre.) I am currently living in halls and have made lots of friends, and am happy with the course but in the back of my head I regret not moving somewhere new (like Liverpool.) I feel as though I'm independent as I do everything myself, but I think it would of been a completely different experience if I moved somewhere new, (although I'm not sure if that's me thinking the grass is greener elsewhere as I do like Manchester.) I initially decided to go to Manchester as most of my friends who have gone to Uni have gone to UoM or mmu and moved into hall. I didn't want to completely leave my life behind and my boyfriend, and never considered that I might miss out by not living in a new city. If I decided I wanted to drop out I would have to start from first year and lose the money from this year of education, and I do have a house for my second year, so I would have to find someone to replace me in the contract. So what I'm wondering is how much I'm missing out and if its worth the hassle?
Original post by scorpioeve
I'm looking for some advice. I currently study Human Biology at Manchester Met, I am in first year and have lived in greater Manchester all my life (25 minutes from the centre.) I am currently living in halls and have made lots of friends, and am happy with the course but in the back of my head I regret not moving somewhere new (like Liverpool.) I feel as though I'm independent as I do everything myself, but I think it would of been a completely different experience if I moved somewhere new, (although I'm not sure if that's me thinking the grass is greener elsewhere as I do like Manchester.) I initially decided to go to Manchester as most of my friends who have gone to Uni have gone to UoM or mmu and moved into hall. I didn't want to completely leave my life behind and my boyfriend, and never considered that I might miss out by not living in a new city. If I decided I wanted to drop out I would have to start from first year and lose the money from this year of education, and I do have a house for my second year, so I would have to find someone to replace me in the contract. So what I'm wondering is how much I'm missing out and if its worth the hassle?


As someone who studied at 2 different universities (going on 3 hopefully), you're not really missing out that much.

Don't get me wrong, Manchester is its own little bubble, but there isn't that drastic of a difference outside of Manchester that makes it worth dropping your course (I won't opine about the university though).
Whether you're in London, Edinburgh, Paris, you're still studying for a degree in a particular subject. If you are doing it right, you should be spending most of your time in the library and hitting the books, not sightseeing. If you want to travel, do it after the exams or during your vacation period, not during.

Irrespective of where you are, life is the same, people still go about their day, and you still get the same ******s vs good people in roughly the same proportions but varying in numbers due to the law of large numbers. I suppose if we all look up, we still figure out the sky is the same shade of blue no matter where we go; unless it's London, some polluted city in Asia, or NYC, then you would be choking on fumes.
Location will affect your ability to network for work purposes, so in that sense location does matter. Academically though, it depends more on the tutor /lecturer who is teaching you than anything else.

Since you're doing biology, it's likely you would be looking at postgrad if you want to make use of your subject e.g. healthcare, teaching, research. If you want, you can score a high mark and try to do a postgrad in another city/area for comparison. I can vouch though that it's not going to be all that different if you are studying right.
Reply 2
Original post by Anonymous
As someone who studied at 2 different universities (going on 3 hopefully), you're not really missing out that much.

Don't get me wrong, Manchester is its own little bubble, but there isn't that drastic of a difference outside of Manchester that makes it worth dropping your course (I won't opine about the university though).
Whether you're in London, Edinburgh, Paris, you're still studying for a degree in a particular subject. If you are doing it right, you should be spending most of your time in the library and hitting the books, not sightseeing. If you want to travel, do it after the exams or during your vacation period, not during.

Irrespective of where you are, life is the same, people still go about their day, and you still get the same ******s vs good people in roughly the same proportions but varying in numbers due to the law of large numbers. I suppose if we all look up, we still figure out the sky is the same shade of blue no matter where we go; unless it's London, some polluted city in Asia, or NYC, then you would be choking on fumes.
Location will affect your ability to network for work purposes, so in that sense location does matter. Academically though, it depends more on the tutor /lecturer who is teaching you than anything else.

Since you're doing biology, it's likely you would be looking at postgrad if you want to make use of your subject e.g. healthcare, teaching, research. If you want, you can score a high mark and try to do a postgrad in another city/area for comparison. I can vouch though that it's not going to be all that different if you are studying right.

hey thanks for your reply,
it’s reassuring to know im not missing out on that much.
The uni itself is decent (some lecturers are better than others) and i do love the subject i’m studying and as you said i do hope to do a masters in order to become a physician associate :smile:
This degree is more of a stepping stone to get onto my masters tbh and i hadn’t considered i could move elsewhere for that!
Original post by scorpioeve
I'm looking for some advice. I currently study Human Biology at Manchester Met, I am in first year and have lived in greater Manchester all my life (25 minutes from the centre.) I am currently living in halls and have made lots of friends, and am happy with the course but in the back of my head I regret not moving somewhere new (like Liverpool.) I feel as though I'm independent as I do everything myself, but I think it would of been a completely different experience if I moved somewhere new, (although I'm not sure if that's me thinking the grass is greener elsewhere as I do like Manchester.) I initially decided to go to Manchester as most of my friends who have gone to Uni have gone to UoM or mmu and moved into hall. I didn't want to completely leave my life behind and my boyfriend, and never considered that I might miss out by not living in a new city. If I decided I wanted to drop out I would have to start from first year and lose the money from this year of education, and I do have a house for my second year, so I would have to find someone to replace me in the contract. So what I'm wondering is how much I'm missing out and if its worth the hassle?


Hi there,
I agree with the other post in that moving away for a postgraduate degree may be a good option. That way you can continue studying and enjoying your current degree but also have the opportunity to explore a new city in the future. Alternatively, you could look at a short stay over summer in a different uni city, if you'd like to get the feel for somewhere else or even travel of your own accord during the holidays. I stayed quite local for my degree but still opted to travel outside of studying and felt like I had the best of both worlds.

Hope this helps!

- Sophie
Reply 4
Original post by StudentRoost Rep
Hi there,
I agree with the other post in that moving away for a postgraduate degree may be a good option. That way you can continue studying and enjoying your current degree but also have the opportunity to explore a new city in the future. Alternatively, you could look at a short stay over summer in a different uni city, if you'd like to get the feel for somewhere else or even travel of your own accord during the holidays. I stayed quite local for my degree but still opted to travel outside of studying and felt like I had the best of both worlds.

Hope this helps!

- Sophie


i’ve seen for the masters that i can do it as an apprenticeship so i could move out for that maybe?
im just worried i’ve missed out on the uni experience by not going somewhere new :frown:
@scorpioeve

(I think I posted a reply before, but maybe I didn't sent it.....)

Cities are cities. They are usually busy, multicultural, with great architecture, good places to eat, fun places to go and great for the arts.

You might prefer one city to another but there really isn't that much difference overall.

I am from London, and most cities I have been to have reminded me of London.

You've met lots of great people, you're independent, you're sharing a house with friends next year I don't think you are really missing out on much!

As others have said, depending on what you want to do afterwards you could always move to another city for work or further study.

You could also do a placement abroad.

Rather than being rueful, try and appreciate all the good things about your uni life it will go so quickly!

All the best,

Oluwatosin 2nd year student University of Huddersfield
Reply 6
Original post by University of Huddersfield
@scorpioeve

(I think I posted a reply before, but maybe I didn't sent it.....)

Cities are cities. They are usually busy, multicultural, with great architecture, good places to eat, fun places to go and great for the arts.

You might prefer one city to another but there really isn't that much difference overall.

I am from London, and most cities I have been to have reminded me of London.

You've met lots of great people, you're independent, you're sharing a house with friends next year I don't think you are really missing out on much!

As others have said, depending on what you want to do afterwards you could always move to another city for work or further study.

You could also do a placement abroad.

Rather than being rueful, try and appreciate all the good things about your uni life it will go so quickly!

All the best,

Oluwatosin 2nd year student University of Huddersfield


hey yeh i’ve got your reply, thankyou!
I think i’ve just been worried that i’ve missed out on the uni experience by staying in my “hometown” and not pushed myself to become independent enough. but I’m not sure if i’m just overthinking it tbh and yeh i always have the option to live somewhere new when i graduate!
Original post by scorpioeve
I'm looking for some advice. I currently study Human Biology at Manchester Met, I am in first year and have lived in greater Manchester all my life (25 minutes from the centre.) I am currently living in halls and have made lots of friends, and am happy with the course but in the back of my head I regret not moving somewhere new (like Liverpool.) I feel as though I'm independent as I do everything myself, but I think it would of been a completely different experience if I moved somewhere new, (although I'm not sure if that's me thinking the grass is greener elsewhere as I do like Manchester.) I initially decided to go to Manchester as most of my friends who have gone to Uni have gone to UoM or mmu and moved into hall. I didn't want to completely leave my life behind and my boyfriend, and never considered that I might miss out by not living in a new city. If I decided I wanted to drop out I would have to start from first year and lose the money from this year of education, and I do have a house for my second year, so I would have to find someone to replace me in the contract. So what I'm wondering is how much I'm missing out and if its worth the hassle?

Hi there,

I think personally if you are enjoying the course and the people on it you should stay. I went to uni in my hometown and I am so glad I did, it has made it much easier for me to be able to see my family and friends outside of uni and not just live in the uni bubble.
There is always an option to study again after, doing a masters or something and then you can choose a different uni, but I know lots of people who stay in their home town and still have an amazing experience.

The most important thing in my opinion is that you are enjoying yourself and you find your course interesting!

I hope this helps,

Ellen
Y3 Medical Student
University of Sunderland
Digital Ambassador
Original post by scorpioeve
I'm looking for some advice. I currently study Human Biology at Manchester Met, I am in first year and have lived in greater Manchester all my life (25 minutes from the centre.) I am currently living in halls and have made lots of friends, and am happy with the course but in the back of my head I regret not moving somewhere new (like Liverpool.) I feel as though I'm independent as I do everything myself, but I think it would of been a completely different experience if I moved somewhere new, (although I'm not sure if that's me thinking the grass is greener elsewhere as I do like Manchester.) I initially decided to go to Manchester as most of my friends who have gone to Uni have gone to UoM or mmu and moved into hall. I didn't want to completely leave my life behind and my boyfriend, and never considered that I might miss out by not living in a new city. If I decided I wanted to drop out I would have to start from first year and lose the money from this year of education, and I do have a house for my second year, so I would have to find someone to replace me in the contract. So what I'm wondering is how much I'm missing out and if its worth the hassle?

If I your happy like the course have made friends and all that good stuff and obviously as you say you like Manchester why change. There is a old saying “If it ain’t broke don’t fix it” . I think that applies here there is nothing stopping you visiting new cities in the summer or if you do a post graduate program after your degree but don’t change now you seem happy and that isn’t always the case . Really this seems to be working why ruin it now.

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