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Graduate Jobs with no exams

Can you help me find graduate jobs that have ni heavy exams like ACA qualification (I got kicked out for failing it at certificate level) .

I have a degree in Chemistry from top 5 UNI in the UK. Barely got a 2.1. ( working most time ... Like 80 hours a week )... I suck at studying... So I need 2x time more to get good marks

Please give me a list of good careers. Thank you :smile:
Can you still access careers advice from your uni?
Original post by Andi.0k
Can you still access careers advice from your uni?


Ye! But I just want to get more ideas
Original post by skyangelbro
Ye! But I just want to get more ideas

Ahh ok that's good then. Maybe look at jobs that either have no subject requirement or will take any stem degree. You can look at jobs where you are just shy of the requirements too and focus on what skills/experience you gained during your time at university.
Original post by Andi.0k
Ahh ok that's good then. Maybe look at jobs that either have no subject requirement or will take any stem degree. You can look at jobs where you are just shy of the requirements too and focus on what skills/experience you gained during your time at university.


Ikr. There are plenty. I was simply wondering if people can recommend some positions
Original post by skyangelbro
Ikr. There are plenty. I was simply wondering if people can recommend some positions


I don't know any personally :/
You just have to keep an eye out
Reply 6
If you look for a job in pharmaceuticals? I don't think that has any certification exam requirement or maybe go into research. It depends what you apply for. If you apply for a job in Finance then any reputable company will expect graduates to sit the professional exams upon recruitment. I think the real question is what do you want to do with your Chemistry degree? if you move into tech -that usually involves some form of certification as a fresh graduate. You could work for the civil service but depending on the area in which you've been employed, you may find certification is needed at some point. Another option is NHS graduate scheme, but just checked and even that involves a 2yr certification in Health something something.
Original post by Makro
If you look for a job in pharmaceuticals? I don't think that has any certification exam requirement or maybe go into research. It depends what you apply for. If you apply for a job in Finance then any reputable company will expect graduates to sit the professional exams upon recruitment. I think the real question is what do you want to do with your Chemistry degree? if you move into tech -that usually involves some form of certification as a fresh graduate. You could work for the civil service but depending on the area in which you've been employed, you may find certification is needed at some point. Another option is NHS graduate scheme, but just checked and even that involves a 2yr certification in Health something something.


I actually found a job, which does has certifications... But they are adequate. I mean... If you work hard you will pass. Unlike ACA exams where the only way to pass is to have a very high memory genetically
Reply 8
Original post by skyangelbro
I actually found a job, which does has certifications... But they are adequate. I mean... If you work hard you will pass. Unlike ACA exams where the only way to pass is to have a very high memory genetically


Very pleased to hear you have something. Wishing you all the very best of luck in your new job.
Original post by Makro
Very pleased to hear you have something. Wishing you all the very best of luck in your new job.


Thanks man.

I think that's the case with trying out what works and what doesn't.
Might be worth checking out Grad Cracker for potential companies
Original post by skyangelbro
I actually found a job, which does has certifications... But they are adequate. I mean... If you work hard you will pass. Unlike ACA exams where the only way to pass is to have a very high memory genetically

ACA exams do not necessarily require high memory genetically, but it does help. With ACA exams, practice makes perfect.

Did you apply for any adjustments whilst doing exams? Maybe that also could have helped.

You are clearly a very capable person studying Chemistry whilst working, in addition to going to a top university.

I'm sure other jobs will appreciate your services.

Did you want to enter Finance / Accounting or work in a laboratory?
Original post by EDUCAREERUK
ACA exams do not necessarily require high memory genetically, but it does help. With ACA exams, practice makes perfect.

Did you apply for any adjustments whilst doing exams? Maybe that also could have helped.

You are clearly a very capable person studying Chemistry whilst working, in addition to going to a top university.

I'm sure other jobs will appreciate your services.

Did you want to enter Finance / Accounting or work in a laboratory?

I think the issue with ACA exams was that only at this point I've realized that I didn't rly enjoy the material itself. I can relate to my experience at university:

I scored 41% in one of my final exams at uni ... This exam I revised the most and thought of it as a memory test. On the other hand I scored pretty much #1 in my dissertation and even got an award for it... Got 78% in physical chemistry and 87% in a math module. For the latter I think I didn't even study 10 hours a week ... COMBINED. I rly enjoyed physical properties and the magic of math/analytics.

I soon realized that what dragged me into ACA is ahigh salary... And I internally lied to myself that this field is highly analytical and mathy .. so I can enjoy it.

I'm now in business analysis, doing exceptionaly well in SQL coding language... Having absorbed months content in a week... Did a past paper for the upcoming exam and scored 36/40 ... And I did like 1-2 hours of revision after college .

That's boils to the fact that I actually enjoyed this job. When I was at school during my GCSE's I did poorly in all off the humanities subjects... On the other hand I got 98% in my math exam and above 95% in sciences. A* was 70 ish % at a time. Again I revised most for humanities.

And I only realized this literally a week ago... When I'm almost in my mid 20s.

May be different for others. I'm at the doctor's whose parents forced them to start a medicine and they hate it now... Yet they qualified.

I guess it boils down to your personality. I can do the work well though... It's the exams I can't do if I don't like something.
Original post by skyangelbro
I think the issue with ACA exams was that only at this point I've realized that I didn't rly enjoy the material itself. I can relate to my experience at university:

I scored 41% in one of my final exams at uni ... This exam I revised the most and thought of it as a memory test. On the other hand I scored pretty much #1 in my dissertation and even got an award for it... Got 78% in physical chemistry and 87% in a math module. For the latter I think I didn't even study 10 hours a week ... COMBINED. I rly enjoyed physical properties and the magic of math/analytics.

I soon realized that what dragged me into ACA is ahigh salary... And I internally lied to myself that this field is highly analytical and mathy .. so I can enjoy it.

I'm now in business analysis, doing exceptionaly well in SQL coding language... Having absorbed months content in a week... Did a past paper for the upcoming exam and scored 36/40 ... And I did like 1-2 hours of revision after college .

That's boils to the fact that I actually enjoyed this job. When I was at school during my GCSE's I did poorly in all off the humanities subjects... On the other hand I got 98% in my math exam and above 95% in sciences. A* was 70 ish % at a time. Again I revised most for humanities.

And I only realized this literally a week ago... When I'm almost in my mid 20s.

May be different for others. I'm at the doctor's whose parents forced them to start a medicine and they hate it now... Yet they qualified.

I guess it boils down to your personality. I can do the work well though... It's the exams I can't do if I don't like something.

The work in audit could be completed by a GCSE student or 15 year old. I honestly believe that you are more than capable of completing anything that you want to and ultimately careers are never linear. Have faith in yourself and I wish you the best.

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