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Can I apply for Medicine after starting a Children's Nursing course?

I'm having a bit of a dilemma.

I'm a graduate with a first in Biological Sciences and a distinction in my MSc. I have A*ABB at A-level in Psychology, Biology, Chemistry and Physics, respectively. I graduated from university 5 years ago, and since them worked for the NHS as a lab assistant before getting a job in a pharmaceutical company as a sales rep.

I've now quit my job in pharma, with the intention of pursuing an undergraduate degree in Children's Nursing in September. However, I have always wanted to study Medicine, and I'm now considering applying for September 2024 entry. However, I'm not sure if being on a Children's Nursing degree would make me look like I'm not committed to Medicine and reflect poorly on me?

My rough plan is:
- Spend the summer studying for the UCAT and trying to obtain work experience in a hospital
- Begin the Children's Nursing degree in September
- Apply for Medicine in October if my UCAT score is ok and, if not, just stick with Children's Nursing

What do you think?
Reply 1
I would be happy with either option, and don't see nursing as a fall back option. However, I have never felt like I'd be a competitive candidate for Medicine so never really allowed myself to consider it
Reply 2
You can. An ''okay UCAT'' won't cut it for a grad. Either you're in the top 10-25%, or you face rejection straight away. You'd be better off studying for the GAMSAT in my opinion and applying to A101. A lot of universities accept a degree in any discipline so they won't care about child nursing. You just need to show in the interview that you understand what it means to be a doctor and that you have the skills necessary. But to even get to the interview, your entrance exam be it GAMSAT, UCAT, or both, need to be high so that you're above the interview threshold. After that, you have to try very hard to be perfect at the interview as the competition is fierce.

Some unis like St Andrews will want a high A-level chemistry grade. Others like St Georges need your degree to be less than 5 years/or have formal education within the last 5 years. Others like Ulster prioritise students living in Ireland/Nothern Ireland over those home applicants. Look at all the small details of each university.

Good luck with whatever you decide
Reply 3
Original post by Pepeh4nds
You can. An ''okay UCAT'' won't cut it for a grad. Either you're in the top 10-25%, or you face rejection straight away. You'd be better off studying for the GAMSAT in my opinion and applying to A101. A lot of universities accept a degree in any discipline so they won't care about child nursing. You just need to show in the interview that you understand what it means to be a doctor and that you have the skills necessary. But to even get to the interview, your entrance exam be it GAMSAT, UCAT, or both, need to be high so that you're above the interview threshold. After that, you have to try very hard to be perfect at the interview as the competition is fierce.

Some unis like St Andrews will want a high A-level chemistry grade. Others like St Georges need your degree to be less than 5 years/or have formal education within the last 5 years. Others like Ulster prioritise students living in Ireland/Nothern Ireland over those home applicants. Look at all the small details of each university.

Good luck with whatever you decide


Thank you for your reply. I was under the impression that I would be better off applying to A100 rather than A101 as it would be less competitive?
Reply 4
Original post by blossomx
Thank you for your reply. I was under the impression that I would be better off applying to A100 rather than A101 as it would be less competitive?


You're right that A100 is less competitive, but that doesn't strictly translate to graduates. It's very common for graduates applying to A100 to be competing against each other for only a small percentage of places. Have a look here: https://www.sgul.ac.uk/study/undergraduate-study/how-to-apply/admissions-statistics
The UCAT cutoffs were different for graduates and school leavers. Also, every uni has a cap on the grads they will accept, I've heard places like Nottingham have historically taken in less than 3 grads in certain years!

There are probably stats out there that compare the 2 courses from a graduate's perspective but I had no luck applying to A100. Only once did I apply to A101 I got 3 interviews and multiple offers.

Do wait for more knowledgeable people to respond and also do research. Use https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/ to find reports and stats published by universities to help you
It’s my understanding that most medical schools won’t consider someone partway through a nursing degree as it shows a lack of dedication to the role - or at least that’s what I’ve read on other threads! The advice has generally been either to complete the course, or, if you’re certain about medicine, don’t start the nursing degree. Of course I could be wrong, I’m going purely off of advice I’ve read on here, but I just thought I should point out that it may not be as easy as applying during your first year of nursing.

Best of luck with whatever you decide :smile:
(edited 11 months ago)

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