The Student Room Group

US Law School- UK applicant

Hello!

I hope you are doing well.

My name is Lola and I am 17. I want to study law abroad in the US, I particularly have my eyes on Stanford and the Ivies, I know, it’s hard to aim for. Even though the UK is one of the best places to study the main reason why I wanna go abroad is to have an escape from my current life. Anyways that’s not the issue.

Does anyone know how I should start the process, what should I do. Please, I need a proper guider, a mentor who can help me step by step.

Please do let me know.

Kind regards,
Lola
Original post by lolaaaaajones789
Hello!

I hope you are doing well.

My name is Lola and I am 17. I want to study law abroad in the US, I particularly have my eyes on Stanford and the Ivies, I know, it’s hard to aim for. Even though the UK is one of the best places to study the main reason why I wanna go abroad is to have an escape from my current life. Anyways that’s not the issue.

Does anyone know how I should start the process, what should I do. Please, I need a proper guider, a mentor who can help me step by step.

Please do let me know.

Kind regards,
Lola

hi, I’m no expert but I looked into this a few years back when I was considering it myself. I never opted for the US due to changes in circumstances and the cost.

In the US, law is primarily a postgraduate subject and unless you really enjoy the subject, there’s not much reason to study it in “college” (the US’ university). If you wanted to qualify and work as a lawyer in the US you would have to do 3 years post graduate law school and then pass the bar. This can cost a fortune, especially if you attend college in the states too. (The rough cost of top end universities like Stanford is $70,000-80,0000 per year inclusive of tuition and living costs, although I’m unsure how much postgraduate law school costs, i assume similar or higher).

If you really want to study law at undergraduate you will first have to study subjects like maths and English and then “major” in law in your later college years. I believe this is sometimes called “pre-law” at undergraduate level.

Studying in the US requires either a lot of money or extreme academic ability. Scholarships are more common at US colleges (usually they can cover up to around 50% of the total cost - leaving around $35,000 a year to pay out of your pocket.) Some institutions such as Harvard are what’s called “need blind” and will meet your full financial aid, ie, give you all the money you need to study after you or your family have paid what you can afford. The “need blind” part means the fact you will require financial aid wont hinder your application (at some colleges it will).

If the cost is no issue then go for it. You would normally apply through something called the “common app” which is a bit like the UK’s “UCAS”.

If you want to study in the US purely for a change of scenery, the UK can offer that too. The UK has many great universities and some which outrank the likes of Harvard, Stanford etc. You will meet a huge variety of people and you will move away from home if that’s what you wish.

Best of luck
Reply 2
Original post by lolaaaaajones789
Hello!

I hope you are doing well.

My name is Lola and I am 17. I want to study law abroad in the US, I particularly have my eyes on Stanford and the Ivies, I know, it’s hard to aim for. Even though the UK is one of the best places to study the main reason why I wanna go abroad is to have an escape from my current life. Anyways that’s not the issue.

Does anyone know how I should start the process, what should I do. Please, I need a proper guider, a mentor who can help me step by step.

Please do let me know.

Kind regards,
Lola


In the United States, a law degree is a 3-year postgraduate degree. For most law schools, the degree you receive upon graduation is a J.D. (Juris Doctor), which is a professional doctorate degree. Admission to law school is based in very large part on two factors: undergraduate grades and LSAT (Law School Admission Test) results. Your undergraduate major is mostly irrelevant, though you may get a small bump for an undergraduate STEM degree. Taking "pre-law" classes is neither necessary nor advised.
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 3
Echo what Eddie's said above.

Studying law in the UK is incredibly expensive. A quick google throws up 3 years of US law school costing an average of c£120,000, that's on top of c£80,000 for the cost of your US undegrad degree - these are just tuition fees - add on living expenses too. That's compared to c£11,000 for your 1 year of UK law school (SQE or LPC) after your law under grad on relatively friendly UK student loan terms. I can't stress enough how incredibly expensive the US university system is - particularly for law.

A US law degree wouldn't entitle you to practice law in the UK, so you are very much locking yourself into a US legal career - if you returned to the UK you'd need to retrain again under the UK system.

The UK is one of the most flexible and cheapest ways to train and succeed in the legal profession if you have the ability so I'd strongly recommend staying within the UK education system, and as Eddie highlights if you're after a geographic change from your current life you have the choice of anywhere from Aberdeen to Exeter.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending