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should I drop a level maths?

im in y12 doing bio, chemistry and maths. it is the second week of sixth form and im struggling with maths already. l don't know what I want to do at university - is it worth sticking with maths to keep my options open? I got an 8 in GCSE maths and im doing exdexcel alevel,
is there a point carrying on with it? and what a levels can I do instead?

edit: was pmsing and dividing instead of square rooting 😜😜😜
(edited 9 months ago)
Honestly, the only trick to getting a good grade in math for AS atleast is finishing the syllabus before the school does and doing ALL the past papers until you're scoring 90+ on each one. I scored a 130 in AS levels and am going into A Levels now, i can say that it gets harder because the first few chapters are meant to be only a small step from GCSE's and the last few are new topics.

But if you dont have the time to get ahead of the syllabus you really should find your schools guidance councilor or head of year and ask them for further steps becuase they would know best
I also got an 8 in maths at GCSE and upon starting the A level course I was extremely shaky at it. It takes time adjusting to it and you'll likely find yourself having to do more practice to understand and get used to it, it's normal to struggle with it at first even if you did well at GCSE. I didn't really fully grasp everything until year 13, although that's partly because I didn't do any independent work in year 12. I think it's worth continuing the course, especially since it is very valuable as it opens a lot of doors when deciding on a university course.
Reply 3
Original post by bananatrader
Honestly, the only trick to getting a good grade in math for AS atleast is finishing the syllabus before the school does and doing ALL the past papers until you're scoring 90+ on each one. I scored a 130 in AS levels and am going into A Levels now, i can say that it gets harder because the first few chapters are meant to be only a small step from GCSE's and the last few are new topics.

But if you dont have the time to get ahead of the syllabus you really should find your schools guidance councilor or head of year and ask them for further steps becuase they would know best

thank you!!
Reply 4
Original post by bloodyeclipse
I also got an 8 in maths at GCSE and upon starting the A level course I was extremely shaky at it. It takes time adjusting to it and you'll likely find yourself having to do more practice to understand and get used to it, it's normal to struggle with it at first even if you did well at GCSE. I didn't really fully grasp everything until year 13, although that's partly because I didn't do any independent work in year 12. I think it's worth continuing the course, especially since it is very valuable as it opens a lot of doors when deciding on a university course.


thank you!!
Original post by zahraq0005
thank you!!


no worries at all, if you wanted any resources i back pmt(https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/) they have everything you'd want for your papers and they have markschemes as well, whenever i didnt understand a topic in math mr bicen helped aswell(https://www.youtube.com/@BicenMaths/playlists?view=50&sort=dd&shelf_id=5) goodluck! you can defo do this the beauty of math is its really back and white
Reply 6
Original post by zahraq0005
im in y12 doing bio, chemistry and maths. it is the second week of sixth form and im struggling with maths already. l don't know what I want to do at university - is it worth sticking with maths to keep my options open? I got an 8 in GCSE maths and im doing exdexcel alevel,
is there a point carrying on with it? and what a levels can I do instead?

I just finished bio, geography and maths at A level this summer. I really struggled with maths in year 10 and 11, not even thinking of doing A-level maths and getting 6s and 7s. I got an A* in A level, all I can say is it's one of the nicest A levels because the amount of effort you put in is directly correlated to how the exams go and it's really easy to revise if you want to, compared with essay subjects or sciences which have more to them than meet the eye and are often tougher to get the top grades in.

You need to give all the subjects a few months before making those decisions - what you're doing right now is nothing like the actual A-level exams you will be tested on. The examiners won't ask you a question upfront to solve a quadratic, for example, they'll blend it with integration or trigonometry. The actual maths A-level doesn't really start until year 13 September... Just try your hardest in all A-levels, have fun as well as work hard and work consistently, don't leave homework and revision until the last minute and start revising for your mocks and actual A-levels (though they may seem an age away) months in advance for the best chance at success!

Good luck
Reply 7
Original post by zahraq0005
thank you!!


What prep work did you do over the summer? If your school did not set any then that's probably why you are struggling

Try these: https://www.drfrostmaths.com/courses.php?coid=29

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