The Student Room Group

How does one run a medical society????

I’m creating a medical society at my school, but I’m a bit lost. I know how I want it to be, but it feels unfeasible by myself? I’ve tried to get others involved and form a leadership committee. I know it’s only been a week since I had the idea and asked if they wanted to help, but they all seem to lack initiative and I can tell I’ll end up doing all the work while they take credit as the “leadership committee”.
Is it possible to just lead it solo? And if so, how should I go about it, so it doesn’t flop?
Also how do I gather members quickly? I’ve sent out emails and talked to people, but there’s not much response…
(edited 8 months ago)
Original post by ewgross
I’m creating a medical society at my school, but I’m a bit lost. I know how I want it to be, but it feels unfeasible by myself? I’ve tried to get others involved and form a leadership committee. I know it’s only been a week since I had the idea and asked if they wanted to help, but they all seem to lack initiative and I can tell I’ll end up doing all the work while they take credit as the “leadership committee”.
Is it possible to just lead it solo? And if so, how should I go about it, so it doesn’t flop?
Also how do I gather members quickly? I’ve sent out emails and talked to people, but there’s not much response…

So you want to create a medicine club:
Create resources about work experience: the importance of volunteering (for example at the NHS), virtual work experience programs (BSMS virtual work experience, springpod NHS virtual work experience, observeGP). Communication skills are essential in medicine so, for example, for your year 12 work experience, anything that helps improve your communication is good - working with children in a nursery or primary school. As you need to adjust you ways of communication so it is understood - using hand gestures, speaking slowly and clearly, using pictures…
Super-curricular activities to show passion for medicine: books (When Breath Becomes Air), making your own research report on a topic in biology, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26876/#:~:text=The%20hypothesis%20that%20RNA%20preceded,gradually%20been%20replaced%20by%20RNA. This website is good to find articles that dont need signing in with an institution login.
UCAT and its preparation: The entrance exam is tough - especially the time pressure. Slowly develop the skills it tests you on. For example, for the verbal reasoning section, practice speed reading. https://www.mindtools.com/aokg6bn/speed-reading For the abstract reasoning, train your pattern recognition skills to be systematic
Medical schools: All medical schools have different selection criteria and selection process. So apply to medical schools that have a lower chance of rejecting you. For example, Exeter is the most lenient towards GCSE’s requiring only level 4 or above in English Language. But Nottingham scores you out of 152 points. 60 points for the SJT banding, 60 points for your UCAT score, 32 points for GCSE (a 9 grade is worth 4 points, 8 is worth 3 points, 7 is worth 2 points, 6 is worth 1 point), requiring a minimum 6 in maths and english. A Levels range from AAA to A*AA to A*A*A. With subjects typically being biology, or chemistry required (both or one of them with another science). So it is important to research all medical schools selection process - especially when it involves the UCAT score.
Alternative routes to medicine: Foundation year (if your A Levels are not what medical schools want, for example, if you didn't do biology or chemistry), graduate medicine.
Interview practice: Your personal statement, UCAT score, GCSE’s, A Level predicted grades all helped you get to interview. So it is time to practice. It is easy to write your passion for medicine, but speaking it is different. Especially with multi mini interviews.
Original post by ewgross
I’m creating a medical society at my school, but I’m a bit lost. I know how I want it to be, but it feels unfeasible by myself? I’ve tried to get others involved and form a leadership committee. I know it’s only been a week since I had the idea and asked if they wanted to help, but they all seem to lack initiative and I can tell I’ll end up doing all the work while they take credit as the “leadership committee”.
Is it possible to just lead it solo? And if so, how should I go about it, so it doesn’t flop?
Also how do I gather members quickly? I’ve sent out emails and talked to people, but there’s not much response…


Hi @ewgross

This sounds like a great idea!

With your leadership committee, have you tried giving members specific roles, such as "secretary" or "events manager"? I am part of a society at university and the committee has specific roles to be filled. This way, people can share the workload together but also have a sense of responsibility. Some roles we have are...
President - to act as a leader
Secretary - to be in charge of admin, emails, contacting external organisations, etc.
Treasurer - to look after the money/budget - if you have one
Participation and Inclusions Officer - to make sure everyone is included
Social Secretary - to organise events
Social Media Manager - for promotion

These are just some examples that might help you to gain some structure for your committee.

To help gather members, I think you're going about it in the right way, but most people your age will most likely be on social media, so maybe a string online presence could help you out. Instagram posts or TikTok videos could be a great boost for the society. You could also try and organise your first event, like a fundraiser, so people can engage with the society. Something like a bake sale could gain you some funds, and get people talking to you about the society - especially if they're enticed by sweet treats!

I hope this helps and you can get the society on track. Best of luck!
Emily :smile:
Reply 3
Original post by BankaiGintoki
So you want to create a medicine club:
Create resources about work experience: the importance of volunteering (for example at the NHS), virtual work experience programs (BSMS virtual work experience, springpod NHS virtual work experience, observeGP). Communication skills are essential in medicine so, for example, for your year 12 work experience, anything that helps improve your communication is good - working with children in a nursery or primary school. As you need to adjust you ways of communication so it is understood - using hand gestures, speaking slowly and clearly, using pictures…
Super-curricular activities to show passion for medicine: books (When Breath Becomes Air), making your own research report on a topic in biology, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26876/#:~:text=The%20hypothesis%20that%20RNA%20preceded,gradually%20been%20replaced%20by%20RNA. This website is good to find articles that dont need signing in with an institution login.
UCAT and its preparation: The entrance exam is tough - especially the time pressure. Slowly develop the skills it tests you on. For example, for the verbal reasoning section, practice speed reading. https://www.mindtools.com/aokg6bn/speed-reading For the abstract reasoning, train your pattern recognition skills to be systematic
Medical schools: All medical schools have different selection criteria and selection process. So apply to medical schools that have a lower chance of rejecting you. For example, Exeter is the most lenient towards GCSE’s requiring only level 4 or above in English Language. But Nottingham scores you out of 152 points. 60 points for the SJT banding, 60 points for your UCAT score, 32 points for GCSE (a 9 grade is worth 4 points, 8 is worth 3 points, 7 is worth 2 points, 6 is worth 1 point), requiring a minimum 6 in maths and english. A Levels range from AAA to A*AA to A*A*A. With subjects typically being biology, or chemistry required (both or one of them with another science). So it is important to research all medical schools selection process - especially when it involves the UCAT score.
Alternative routes to medicine: Foundation year (if your A Levels are not what medical schools want, for example, if you didn't do biology or chemistry), graduate medicine.
Interview practice: Your personal statement, UCAT score, GCSE’s, A Level predicted grades all helped you get to interview. So it is time to practice. It is easy to write your passion for medicine, but speaking it is different. Especially with multi mini interviews.


Thank you so much! I think I can create a timeline now :biggrin:
Reply 4
Original post by BCU Student Rep
Hi @ewgross

This sounds like a great idea!

With your leadership committee, have you tried giving members specific roles, such as "secretary" or "events manager"? I am part of a society at university and the committee has specific roles to be filled. This way, people can share the workload together but also have a sense of responsibility. Some roles we have are...
President - to act as a leader
Secretary - to be in charge of admin, emails, contacting external organisations, etc.
Treasurer - to look after the money/budget - if you have one
Participation and Inclusions Officer - to make sure everyone is included
Social Secretary - to organise events
Social Media Manager - for promotion

These are just some examples that might help you to gain some structure for your committee.

To help gather members, I think you're going about it in the right way, but most people your age will most likely be on social media, so maybe a string online presence could help you out. Instagram posts or TikTok videos could be a great boost for the society. You could also try and organise your first event, like a fundraiser, so people can engage with the society. Something like a bake sale could gain you some funds, and get people talking to you about the society - especially if they're enticed by sweet treats!

I hope this helps and you can get the society on track. Best of luck!
Emily :smile:


Thanks for you advice! People are definitely more active on Insta and Snap, so I’ll try spread the word on those platforms. A bake sale would be a great way to delegate + get used to committee roles and increase our presence at the same time! Plus, it’ll be super fun!

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