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Supercurriculars for law

Super curricular activities for law? Any suggestions to make you stand out while applying to uni?
Hi there,

A great way to stand out is to show off your knowledge of the law but also the skills you have developed. I recommend completing work placements. I recommend visiting the following websites: ratemyplacement, brightnetwork and prospects. You can find many placements on these websites, some are not law related but there are many opportunities to work in Human Resources. What universities and even your future employers want to see from you, is not just your knowledge of the law but also the key, transferrable skills you have developed on your part-time job, for example, as well as on the placement. These key skills include, communication skills, presentation skills, client-interviewing skills, negotiation skills, time-management and many more. They also want to know 'how' you have developed these skills.

I also recommend attending events, this could be in-person and online. Have a look at the following websites: legal cheek, bright network, eventbrite, LinkedIn, University of Law (and also other universities hold events). This is a great way to network and connect with lawyers and any individual working in the legal field. It would be great to create a LinkedIn profile to make your connections.

When applying to study law, they're trying to see if your capable of studying law, your interest in it, your intellectual curiosity, if you are a likeable as a person, and the key skills you have developed as I mentioned above.
Consider why they should pick you, what makes you so different to all the other applicants. Do you have experience in debating or interviewing clients? Even if you don't have the experience, are you aware of the importance of client-interviewing and negotiation in the legal field as well as other work fields. If you are not able to secure a placement with a firm, you could simply ask your local firms to work shadow. I would also recommend completing some background reading on law such as how the English legal system works. Consider what part of law you want to specialise in and why? E.g. you may like to specialise in commercial law because you understand the concept of client-confidentiality in a contract and the importance of negotiation as an alternative method of dispute resolution, so that both parties resolving their dispute can compromise and come to a win-win situation and etc. Who or what inspired you?

Additionally, if these activities are available in your school or outside of school, you could join the debating team, perhaps sign up for moot competitions (starting locally), maybe begin a law society in your school.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,
Narusha
Coventry University Student Ambassador
(edited 3 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by Coventry University Student Ambassadors
Hi there,

A great way to stand out is to show off your knowledge of the law but also the skills you have developed. I recommend completing work placements. I recommend visiting the following websites: ratemyplacement, brightnetwork and prospects. You can find many placements on these websites, some are not law related but there are many opportunities to work in Human Resources. What universities and even your future employers want to see from you, is not just your knowledge of the law but also the key, transferrable skills you have developed on your part-time job, for example, as well as on the placement. These key skills include, communication skills, presentation skills, client-interviewing skills, negotiation skills, time-management and many more. They also want to know 'how' you have developed these skills.

I also recommend attending events, this could be in-person and online. Have a look at the following websites: legal cheek, bright network, eventbrite, LinkedIn, University of Law (and also other universities hold events). This is a great way to network and connect with lawyers and any individual working in the legal field. It would be great to create a LinkedIn profile to make your connections.

When applying to study law, they're trying to see if your capable of studying law, your interest in it, your intellectual curiosity, if you are a likeable as a person, and the key skills you have developed as I mentioned above.
Consider why they should pick you, what makes you so different to all the other applicants. Do you have experience in debating or interviewing clients? Even if you don't have the experience, are you aware of the importance of client-interviewing and negotiation in the legal field as well as other work fields. If you are not able to secure a placement with a firm, you could simply ask your local firms to work shadow. I would also recommend completing some background reading on law such as how the English legal system works. Consider what part of law you want to specialise in and why? E.g. you may like to specialise in commercial law because you understand the concept of client-confidentiality in a contract and the importance of negotiation as an alternative method of dispute resolution, so that both parties resolving their dispute can compromise and come to a win-win situation and etc. Who or what inspired you?

Additionally, if these activities are available in your school or outside of school, you could join the debating team, perhaps sign up for moot competitions (starting locally), maybe begin a law society in your school.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,
Narusha
Coventry University Student Ambassador

Thank you!
The only ones I had were books I'd read off the uni's reading list, an open university course I'd done (one of the free online ones), and my law related EPQ

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