The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

What is meant by LSE's policy on 'language qualifications'?

On LSE's website when discussing Modern Languages as a preferable A level subject there is an Asterix which leads to a page on language qualifications. It reads "LSE values the skills that language acquisition brings and many of our applicants describe themselves as bi, tri or multi-lingual. We do however differentiate between language learning qualifications and those designed for competent language users, and this is taken into account when considering subject combinations." Does this mean an A Level in a non native language is seen as favourable to someone who is fluent? Would they even accept the qualification from someone is fluent? If not, how would they know they were fluent?
Reply 1
'language qualifications'.

"Where we have reason to believe a student has significant prior exposure to a language, we may exclude a language learning qualification from any offer we make.

Significant prior exposure to a language may include:

- you, your immediate family or your community regularly speak the language during day-to-day life.

- you live or have lived in a country where that language is commonly spoken.

- you are or have been educated in that language.

...

In order to help us with this decision, we take into account all information provided on the UCAS application such as nationality, schools attended (pre and post-16), completed language qualifications, normal place of residence and information from your referee. Where it is unclear to us whether the language qualification being taken is providing a significant academic challenge, we may require further information from you or your referee before we make our final decision."
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
Original post by libbyff5
On LSE's website when discussing Modern Languages as a preferable A level subject there is an Asterix which leads to a page on language qualifications. It reads "LSE values the skills that language acquisition brings and many of our applicants describe themselves as bi, tri or multi-lingual. We do however differentiate between language learning qualifications and those designed for competent language users, and this is taken into account when considering subject combinations." Does this mean an A Level in a non native language is seen as favourable to someone who is fluent? Would they even accept the qualification from someone is fluent? If not, how would they know they were fluent?

Hi, Adama here. In practical terms, this means that LSE recognizes the value of language skills and the diversity of language backgrounds among applicants. However, the university also considers the specific qualifications and levels of proficiency in languages when evaluating applications, particularly in relation to the chosen academic subjects. This differentiation may be important in certain academic programs where language skills are relevant or required.

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