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Top unis for law with wrong a-levels

I've recently realised that the Alevels I chose are not as strong for getting into a top law uni like I've been aiming for. As a student who got 9s in 12 GCSEs, I was hoping to apply to Oxbridge but I take RE, Maths and Economics. Since the Cambridge website said 86% of offer holders took English, or took History/a Language I'm worried not taking these would detriment my application both there and at other universities (eg LSE and UCL). Would this be the case? Any suggestions as to what to do now?
Original post by studysturdy
I've recently realised that the Alevels I chose are not as strong for getting into a top law uni like I've been aiming for. As a student who got 9s in 12 GCSEs, I was hoping to apply to Oxbridge but I take RE, Maths and Economics. Since the Cambridge website said 86% of offer holders took English, or took History/a Language I'm worried not taking these would detriment my application both there and at other universities (eg LSE and UCL). Would this be the case? Any suggestions as to what to do now?

I would not worry too much. I just think it likely that a lot of those looking to study Law would have taken one or more of English/History/a Language because they also like those subjects. These are by no means required subjects, and all of your A Level choices are in the list of those generally recommended by Cambridge. Oxford just suggests an essay subject is helpful and you have I believe two there (RE and Economics).
Original post by studysturdy
I've recently realised that the Alevels I chose are not as strong for getting into a top law uni like I've been aiming for. As a student who got 9s in 12 GCSEs, I was hoping to apply to Oxbridge but I take RE, Maths and Economics. Since the Cambridge website said 86% of offer holders took English, or took History/a Language I'm worried not taking these would detriment my application both there and at other universities (eg LSE and UCL). Would this be the case? Any suggestions as to what to do now?

Law has no subject requirements.

Your subjects are fine.
Reply 3
I think your subjects are fine. They are all respected academic subjects.
Reply 4
the only one that might care is LSE bc they're weird
Original post by studysturdy
I've recently realised that the Alevels I chose are not as strong for getting into a top law uni like I've been aiming for. As a student who got 9s in 12 GCSEs, I was hoping to apply to Oxbridge but I take RE, Maths and Economics. Since the Cambridge website said 86% of offer holders took English, or took History/a Language I'm worried not taking these would detriment my application both there and at other universities (eg LSE and UCL). Would this be the case? Any suggestions as to what to do now?

I dont know specifically about Cambridge but most subjects want 2 off their preferred subject list and all 3 of yours are on the lists. You have an essay based subject RE and Maths which shows analytical skills so I think you would be fine. If in doubt check with the universities concerned either by email or better still phone What you may need to check with Cambridge is each college because they sometimes have different requirements and some might accept whilst others wont.

Here is LSEs preferred subject list

Admissions information
Each application we receive is carefully considered on an individual basis, taking into account the full range of information presented on the UCAS application form.
The information below is designed to help our prospective applicants who may have queries ranging from preferred subject combinations, our stance on retakes, and the manner in which we assess the information presented in your application.
As you will see from the application data provided on our individual programme pages, there is a great deal of competition for places at the School. In 2023, we received around 26,000 applications for 1,800 places. This fierce competition for places means that meeting or exceeding the entry requirements does not guarantee that an offer will be made, and every year we unfortunately have to disappoint many well-qualified applicants.
Subject combinations
Introduction As the majority of our applicants apply with A-levels, this guidance is written primarily towards that audience. However, the information contained is relevant to students offering any qualification. If you are unsure how this guidance applies to your qualification, please contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office. Note that where specific guidance regarding the suitability of a particular subject/subject combination is given on the entry requirements pages of Information for international students, that guidance supersedes the more general guidance given below. Subject combinations and non-preferred subjects The School considers not only the individual qualifications offered by applicants but also the combination of subjects offered. Individual degree programmes may have specific subject requirements or preferences which are listed in the admissions criteria for each individual programme. We also have a number of general policies, listed below. We consider traditional academic subjects to be the best preparation for studying at LSE. We expect applicants to offer at least two full A-levels or IBDP Higher Levels in these subjects (although typically, applicants will apply with three or four); please see the list below for guidance. Some subjects provide a less effective preparation for study at LSE. We refer to these as non-preferred subjects; please see the list below for guidance. These subjects should only be offered in combination with two traditional academic subjects. Finally, there are a small number of A-levels which are normally excluded from our standard offer; please see the list below. Applicants should offer three full A-levels or equivalent alongside these subjects. Common traditional academic/'generally preferred' subjects:

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Ancient History

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Biology

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Classical Civilisation

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Chemistry

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Computing

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Economics

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Electronics

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English (English Language, English Literature and English Language and Literature)

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Further Mathematics*

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Geography

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Government and Politics

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History

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Languages: Modern Foreign, Classic and Community**

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Law

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Mathematics

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Music

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Philosophy

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Physics

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Psychology

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Religious Studies

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Sociology

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