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A-Level Guidance Needed - Economics or Computer Science?

Hi everyone,

I'm reaching out for some advice on my A-Level subject choices. I've already decided on Maths and Further Maths, but I'm struggling to pick between Economics and Computer Science, and I'm even considering doing both if it's manageable.

Here's where I stand: I moved from Germany after compleing my GCSE equivalent, I did pretty well in Maths at GCSE (got a grade 9) and I have a knack for numbers, I got a 7-8 in English, however i did not have fun at all studying for my exams in IGCSE English. But I'm not a huge fan of long essays. Economics seems intriguing because it's like applying maths to understand the world, but Computer Science also seems exciting with its focus on problem-solving.

Furthermore after choosing one of the subject, I would like to do a joint degree in either Maths & Economics or Maths & Computer Science or maybe only Maths. I am also aiming for great Uni's, as I am very confident that my grades in Maths and Further Maths will be great...

I'm just wondering which one might require more time and effort, especially considering my preference for numbers over essays. If any of you have experience with this or any advice to share, I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks a lot,
(edited 3 months ago)
Reply 1
Idk if your school allows it but you should start off the year with 4 a levels to see which one you enjoy most and then drop one if you want to take only three - however you do sound like a very capable student who could almost definitely do 4 a levels, and this might be a good idea in order to keep your options open - having maths and further maths as two out of three a levels does really narrow your options down.
Reply 2
Hi,

I take economics and it is definitely more of an essay subject. I’m not the strongest with maths but I can easily do the maths in economics, it definitely doesn’t focus on it. So if you don’t like essays then that might play a big factor into taking economics.

Do you know what exam boards they are?

Let me know if you have any further questions.
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by IVEX18
Hi everyone,
I'm reaching out for some advice on my A-Level subject choices. I've already decided on Maths and Further Maths, but I'm struggling to pick between Economics and Computer Science, and I'm even considering doing both if it's manageable.
Here's where I stand: I moved from Germany after compleing my GCSE equivalent, I did pretty well in Maths at GCSE (got a grade 9) and I have a knack for numbers, I got a 7-8 in English, however i did not have fun at all studying for my exams in IGCSE English. But I'm not a huge fan of long essays. Economics seems intriguing because it's like applying maths to understand the world, but Computer Science also seems exciting with its focus on problem-solving.
Furthermore after choosing one of the subject, I would like to do a joint degree in either Maths & Economics or Maths & Computer Science or maybe only Maths. I am also aiming for great Uni's, as I am very confident that my grades in Maths and Further Maths will be great...
I'm just wondering which one might require more time and effort, especially considering my preference for numbers over essays. If any of you have experience with this or any advice to share, I'd really appreciate it.
Thanks a lot,


I would definitely say economics takes a lot more time than computer science. For me I chose economics because of the mathematical side of it. The only downside is that it’s much more essay based in mathematical and I do AQA economics, and I only have one question which is a mathematical question and everything else is essay questions so I would definitely say see which one you prefer by going into both classes and then see if you have any example papers that your teachers have got from other students in the past that you can have a look and see if it is kind of what you’re after. I love more than anything in the world and personally I feel like economics does click into the problem-solving kind of analogy. With regards to the whole. If example, VAT is putting in place as a governmental policy, this could affect consumers and households because it means the household has less disposable income. To be honest I feel like economics is kind of like geography in the sense that you’re picking a point and analysing it, but I would definitely go to both even if you do end up taking economics and you do struggle at first, it will click into be honest economics seems so much easier than year 12 because it makes more sense and it’s a challenge which also makes it kind of fun
if you prefer numbers, do physics,

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