The Student Room Group

Where to go for investment advice?

I have some money spare that’s been sitting in an account and I’m interested in investing in bonds/index funds/ stocks and shares to get my money to be a bit more active rather than wasting away due to inflation.

But I’m not sure where to start or where to go to find out more about the investing world.

~SK
Reply 1
Ask at the bank/building society where you have the account?

Places don't always have resident investment advisors so you may need to book an appointment for when they visit.
Original post by SK-18
I have some money spare that’s been sitting in an account and I’m interested in investing in bonds/index funds/ stocks and shares to get my money to be a bit more active rather than wasting away due to inflation.

But I’m not sure where to start or where to go to find out more about the investing world.

~SK

The following website is a good place to search for an adviser:

https://www.unbiased.co.uk/

The following article is also worth a read:

https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/savings/investment-beginners/
Reply 3
Original post by SK-18
I have some money spare that’s been sitting in an account and I’m interested in investing in bonds/index funds/ stocks and shares to get my money to be a bit more active rather than wasting away due to inflation.

But I’m not sure where to start or where to go to find out more about the investing world.

~SK

That depends on how much "some money" is.

A recommendation would be different depending on whether "some money" means (say) £1000, or £5000, or £20,000, or ....

Bear in mind that if you approach a financial advisor you'll need to pay.

If you see your bank/building society's financial advisor you may well find they are restricted to advising on their employer's own products (or that plus a limited range of products from other providers). and those might not necessarily be best for you.

Citizens Advice have a good page at https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/debt-and-money/financial-advice/getting-financial-advice/

Bear in mind that investing means taking risk -- the value of your investments can go down as well as up. Before considering investments make sure you've got a sensibly-sized pot of cash available to you at short notice to deal with emergencies. The usual recommendation is 3-6 months' living expenses. (NatWest say here that "It’s recommended you have at least 3 month’s worth of living expenses in an emergency fund, ideally up to 6 months’".)

Be aware that "high street" banks tend to offer derisory rates on their savings accounts, so you need to shop around a bit. I tend to look at the "league tables" at thisismoney.co.uk (easy access accounts) but there's also MoneySavingExpert (top savings accounts). A lot of the top-paying accounts these days limit the number of withdrawals you can make per year, so you need to watch our for that.
Original post by martin7
Original post by SK-18
I have some money spare that’s been sitting in an account and I’m interested in investing in bonds/index funds/ stocks and shares to get my money to be a bit more active rather than wasting away due to inflation.

But I’m not sure where to start or where to go to find out more about the investing world.

~SK

That depends on how much "some money" is.

A recommendation would be different depending on whether "some money" means (say) £1000, or £5000, or £20,000, or ....

Bear in mind that if you approach a financial advisor you'll need to pay.

If you see your bank/building society's financial advisor you may well find they are restricted to advising on their employer's own products (or that plus a limited range of products from other providers). and those might not necessarily be best for you.

Citizens Advice have a good page at https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/debt-and-money/financial-advice/getting-financial-advice/

Bear in mind that investing means taking risk -- the value of your investments can go down as well as up. Before considering investments make sure you've got a sensibly-sized pot of cash available to you at short notice to deal with emergencies. The usual recommendation is 3-6 months' living expenses. (NatWest say here that "It’s recommended you have at least 3 month’s worth of living expenses in an emergency fund, ideally up to 6 months’".)

Be aware that "high street" banks tend to offer derisory rates on their savings accounts, so you need to shop around a bit. I tend to look at the "league tables" at thisismoney.co.uk (easy access accounts) but there's also MoneySavingExpert (top savings accounts). A lot of the top-paying accounts these days limit the number of withdrawals you can make per year, so you need to watch our for that.


Thanks for the detailed response, I was thinking of investing in a global all cap index fund as I’ve heard that UK growth is kinda slow. I understand the volatility risk but I’d rather chance it rather than sitting in a 2% account.
Reply 5
The best bet is to get as much free advice as you can from your bank, streetwise friends and helpful websites like money saving expert.

Depending on how much you have to invest and for how long, it could be worth paying for some financial advice. Bear in mind it isn’t cheap and you need to believe it will deliver better returns that justify the payment.

Regular saving for a reasonable time period, say min 5 years, in to a fund which has a decent prospect of staying ahead of inflation is a very good idea. Lifetime ISA are worth a look. Hargreaves Landsdown aim to help people with pension and share investment at reasonable cost. Or perhaps someone you know has a financial advisor they would recommend.

Also a decent employer with sound pension and sharesave schemes is worth its weight in gold as a source of free, well judged, investment options
Reply 6
Original post by SK-18

Thanks for the detailed response, I was thinking of investing in a global all cap index fund as I’ve heard that UK growth is kinda slow. I understand the volatility risk but I’d rather chance it rather than sitting in a 2% account.


You can do much better than 2% on instant access savings. One of the links I provided currently has a list of 12 providers paying 5% or more, and 14 more paying between 4.6 and 4.95%.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by martin7
Original post by SK-18

Thanks for the detailed response, I was thinking of investing in a global all cap index fund as I’ve heard that UK growth is kinda slow. I understand the volatility risk but I’d rather chance it rather than sitting in a 2% account.


You can do much better than 2% on instant access savings. One of the links I provided currently has a list of 12 providers paying 5% or more, and 14 more paying between 4.6 and 4.95%.


Thank you for your time! Have a good night.
Reply 8
I'd suggest starting with some basic research online. There are plenty of resources available to help you understand different investment options and strategies. Additionally, talking to friends or family who have experience investing can provide recommendations. Once you've done some groundwork, consider getting a consultation from an expert or financial advisor (to find a reliable one, check holborn assets reviews). They can offer personalized advice tailored to your financial goals and risk tolerance.
(edited 3 weeks ago)

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