does anyone here get severe panic attacks? Watch

User129003
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#1
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#1
was wondering as I used to suffer from these but then I took escitalopram
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username233985
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#2
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yeah i do... does it work?
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emilyjane_09
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I've only ever had one panic attack, it was horrific. I can't imagine suffering from them often..
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bowiedout
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Yeah, have been suffering from really bad panic attacks for nearly 2 years now...
How long have you been on escitalopram for and how is it making you feel?
I got put on a 10mg course about 1 1/2 months ago.
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Chloe-Marie
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I only suffer from panic attacks in a particular situation.. e.g. rollercoasters.
They are not nice at all, I'd hate to suffer from them often!
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Ste9890
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What actually happens when you suffer a panic attack? Just curious
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cazzcazz
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#7
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yeh i used to like five times a day a year ago. i got lexapro for it... im better now thou
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Anonymous #1
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yes. It's frustrating just how violent my physical reactions are to stressful situations/the trigger. Bloody awful. I was probably 20 seconds away from fainting a few days back because of a panic attack. Thankfully I made the decision to leave the room before fainting in a room with 20 people watching. Didn't faint in the end, my blood pressure would have led to this, but I was able to regain proper breathing when I was out in the fresh air.
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QuantumTheory
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#9
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Had my first today after a few months of none. Scary stuffs.
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tuesday91
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Have had, but not really so severe and not so often anymore.
Nasty things though, nevertheless
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sinesquared.
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#11
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I DO.
I have no medication though.
Because my GP expects them to go away after my exams.
They're really horrible..when your face goes tingly and your arms cramp up..

hate them
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hannah_dru
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#12
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I used to get severe ones about 2 years ago. They come back every so often but I'm able to combat them.
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sparkley84
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#13
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I used to suffer from them 5-6 years ago. I had depression and anxiety disorder. Still on meds now but perfectly fine. Not had a panic attack in about 3 years. So it can be beaten!
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User129003
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#14
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(Original post by victoria13)
yeah i do... does it work?
yeah it does I havent had one for about 8 months since being on these
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reddevilleanne
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(Original post by Anonymous)
yes. It's frustrating just how violent my physical reactions are to stressful situations/the trigger. Bloody awful. I was probably 20 seconds away from fainting a few days back because of a panic attack. Thankfully I made the decision to leave the room before fainting in a room with 20 people watching. Didn't faint in the end, my blood pressure would have led to this, but I was able to regain proper breathing when I was out in the fresh air.
A psychologist that I saw a few years back said to me that you can't faint from a panic attack. During a panic attack, your blood pressure goes up, whereas when you're about to faint, your blood pressure goes down, so it's impossible.
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fire2burn
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#16
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(Original post by reddevilleanne)
A psychologist that I saw a few years back said to me that you can't faint from a panic attack. During a panic attack, your blood pressure goes up, whereas when you're about to faint, your blood pressure goes down, so it's impossible.
This is very true, thank you for pointing it out so I didn't have to. People do not pass out during a panic attack unless there is an underlying physiological reason for it to occur. A panic attack in itself is unable to cause fainting due to the reasons you mentioned. Fainting occurs when blood pressure in the brain drops to an unsafe level, the body 'faints' in order to make the body level and thus easier for the heart to pump blood to the brain. In a panic attack blood pressure increases not decreases. (Simple way of saying it but everyone gets the idea).

The faintness during a panic attack is just a fear, not an actual possibility.

Fear of fainting or collapse

A common thought during a panic attack, especially if you feel dizzy or your legs feel weak, is that you will faint or collapse. These sensations are also a normal feature of anxiety or fear. They occur as a result of adrenaline being released into the bloodstream. You believe that you will faint or collapse only because you have misinterpreted those physical sensations. I will explain why it is impossible for you to faint during a panic attack.

When your heart beats fast during a panic, your blood pressure goes up. Fainting is a reflex reaction that only occurs if the blood pressure to your brain is too low. Very low blood pressure forces you to fall down so as to allow more blood to flow to your brain.

A common cause of fainting is standing for long periods on a hot day or in a stuffy place - a problem which can affect shop assistants or soldiers on parade, for example. Fainting is also a reflex action to the sight of a lot of blood. But people rarely faint in normal conditions if they are in good health.

Remember that in a panic attack your blood pressure is going up which will prevent you fainting. You may feel as if you are going to faint or collapse during a panic attack but it is just impossible. You can check this out by trying to reproduce the symptoms of dizziness you get in a panic attack by spinning round in a large room or open space. Then remain standing with your eyes shut. It may feel as if you are going to collapse but it does not happen because the balance mechanism in your ear prevents you from falling. And even if you did collapse in a panic, how much would it really matter? You are probably afraid of causing a scene, but even if you did faint, and I would dispute that it is possible, you would come round in a few seconds and then you could simply get up and walk off.

In summary, the fear that you will faint or collapse is only a symptom of a panic attack and makes the experience much worse. If you believe that you are about to collapse, you will feel more anxious and frightened and so get more sensations of dizziness. This feeds a vicious circle of further anxiety and creates more physical sensations.

So when you next start to get a panic attack, remind yourself that it is impossible to faint. Write down on a card why you are not going to faint or have a heart attack and read it when you start to get panicky. Remember that the sensations may be unpleasant but you will come to no harm. It will also help if you regularly provoke the symptoms of dizziness to get used to the sensations. You could do this, for example, by spinning yourself around.

http://www.cragface.co.uk/panic_attack.asp
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sharpesparkle
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#17
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I used to have panic attacks which came on in the form of shaking and hyperventilating, with a sense of there being a huge weight on me. I got over them with counselling.

Now I keep having 'episodes' in public places like shops where I'll suddenly feel really claustrophobic, too hot and really sick and desperate for air...I have to run out of the shop to get outside. I think maybe my panic attacks have returned but are manifesting themselves differently. Is that possible? Hmm.
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