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Liverpool GEM (A101) 2016 entry watch

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    It's not secret, it's on their website:

    The School of Medicine reviews applications in a stepwise process against the publishedadmission requirements, and invites suitable applicants for interview. Selection is highlycompetitive, and both academic and non-academic criteria inform the selection process.Because of the strong competition, meeting the minimum academic and non-academicrequirements does not guarantee that you will receive an invitation to an interview.Applications are assessed using prior academic achievement, predicted grades, admissionstests and applicants’ non-academic values/ attributes/experience. The selection procedure atLiverpool is a three-stage process, which is competitive at each stage. The threshold forprogressing through each stage varies from year to year, depending on the quality andquantity of applications that year.

    Stage 1 (academic ability and use of admissions test)

    Stage 2 (non-academic attributes)Applicants demonstrating the most academic potential are then assessed against our nonacademiccriteria, which include health care career awareness and insight, caring for thecommunity, a critical, coherent, and informative approach to written communication and thevalues that embody and underpin good healthcare practice. Those applicants who havesuccessfully passed from the first stage of the process and who have successfullydemonstrated that they meet these criteria are invited to interview.

    Stage 3 Interview

    It goes into more detail on these links:
    https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/media/li...on,2015-16.pdf

    https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/media/li...es,for,all.pdf

    (Original post by HCAssistant93)
    All those people with cut offs higher than the 55 it appears to be, I would firstly ring then on Monday morning and query it!

    If you had two diff scores form two sittings and didn't declare which know you wanted to use they would automatically use the latest UK one.

    They may have other secret criteria they don't mention and not just purely a gamsat cut off.

    But if it were I would ring and ask


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    Good luck everyone! I can't help you with interview information, but I'm happy to help if you have any questions about the Liverpool GEM course.
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    Good luck everyone! I can't help you with interview information, but I'm happy to help if you have any questions about the Liverpool GEM course.
    How intense is it? Do you get much patient exposure in first year? Do you love it?
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    It's not secret, it's on their website:

    The School of Medicine reviews applications in a stepwise process against the publishedadmission requirements, and invites suitable applicants for interview. Selection is highlycompetitive, and both academic and non-academic criteria inform the selection process.Because of the strong competition, meeting the minimum academic and non-academicrequirements does not guarantee that you will receive an invitation to an interview.Applications are assessed using prior academic achievement, predicted grades, admissionstests and applicants’ non-academic values/ attributes/experience. The selection procedure atLiverpool is a three-stage process, which is competitive at each stage. The threshold forprogressing through each stage varies from year to year, depending on the quality andquantity of applications that year.

    Stage 1 (academic ability and use of admissions test)

    Stage 2 (non-academic attributes)Applicants demonstrating the most academic potential are then assessed against our nonacademiccriteria, which include health care career awareness and insight, caring for thecommunity, a critical, coherent, and informative approach to written communication and thevalues that embody and underpin good healthcare practice. Those applicants who havesuccessfully passed from the first stage of the process and who have successfullydemonstrated that they meet these criteria are invited to interview.

    Stage 3 Interview

    It goes into more detail on these links:
    https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/media/li...on,2015-16.pdf

    https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/media/li...es,for,all.pdf
    Thanks, I wasn't aware of this but I have an interview and this is interesting to know!


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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    How intense is it? Do you get much patient exposure in first year? Do you love it?
    It's actually the second year of the new five year course! You're not doing a specific GEM first year, it's second year with some extra help from the GEM year leads. So not too intense at all. First semester was difficult purely due to the length, as there's a GEM summer school to give you all a good physiology base to work from and generally help you get to know each other.

    You go onto placement in october, so super duper early. The year works with you doing a four week block of lectures based on a system (Neuro, urogenital, respiratory, GI, Cardiology, muscoskeletal, endocrine), then one week of placement following it. You get 7 weeks of placement spread throughout your first year.

    I love the course! I find that I've had much better access to resources than my previous university, the staff are helpful and I think it generally makes a lot of sense. Additionally getting to go out there and see patients is great, and I've just had a mock OSCE so it's clear what I need to do in summer. There's things that could be improved on, but our staff student liaison people have brought it up and I'm seeing visible improvements based on what we're saying.
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    It's actually the second year of the new five year course! You're not doing a specific GEM first year, it's second year with some extra help from the GEM year leads. So not too intense at all. First semester was difficult purely due to the length, as there's a GEM summer school to give you all a good physiology base to work from and generally help you get to know each other.

    You go onto placement in october, so super duper early. The year works with you doing a four week block of lectures based on a system (Neuro, urogenital, respiratory, GI, Cardiology, muscoskeletal, endocrine), then one week of placement following it. You get 7 weeks of placement spread throughout your first year.

    I love the course! I find that I've had much better access to resources than my previous university, the staff are helpful and I think it generally makes a lot of sense. Additionally getting to go out there and see patients is great, and I've just had a mock OSCE so it's clear what I need to do in summer. There's things that could be improved on, but our staff student liaison people have brought it up and I'm seeing visible improvements based on what we're saying.
    Thank you! Were the interviewers generally friendly or is it the inpersonal wall of cold like some assessment centres?
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    Good luck everyone! I can't help you with interview information, but I'm happy to help if you have any questions about the Liverpool GEM course.
    Hey, how do you like Liverpool as a City/ as a university ? Are there a good amount of medic societies? How's the union? Also, do you feel disadvantaged compared to medics on the traditional 5 year course who are in their second year? ( or was everything they covered in their first covered by the summer school/your previous degree?)
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    (Original post by kethan)
    Hey, how do you like Liverpool as a City/ as a university ? Are there a good amount of medic societies? How's the union? Also, do you feel disadvantaged compared to medics on the traditional 5 year course who are in their second year? ( or was everything they covered in their first covered by the summer school/your previous degree?)
    Liverpool's a brilliant city, there's good shopping, people are friendly, good nightlife

    Medic societies are fab. You've got LMSS which is one for all medics, plus one medic society for basically every society. They all put on extra lectures and revision sessions. Plus medic sports!

    Union is pretty great, it's a nice place to go for lunch or on breaks. Normally I'll go elsewhere for nightlife but it seems like they have good stuff on. The food isn't the cheapest however since they've poshed it all up, would deffo recommend the burritos if you're popping in after your interview. Christmas was really good, they got reindeer in and Father Christmas handing out free chocolate, and there's rumours of them getting puppies in for exam stress

    As for disadvantage, it's a yes and no. On the one hand, I haven't covered as much as they have. On the other hand, most of them have forgotten it anyway! Plus you do all of year 1 clinical skills in the summer school, so I've learned those things more recently, and the extra support we get makes it not as big a gap. According to grad course lead, the grads end up at the top end of results at the end of whole second year cohort usually, so if that continues its fine

    As for interview, it depends on the station. Just stay professional and it'll be okay.
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    Liverpool's a brilliant city, there's good shopping, people are friendly, good nightlife

    Medic societies are fab. You've got LMSS which is one for all medics, plus one medic society for basically every society. They all put on extra lectures and revision sessions. Plus medic sports!

    Union is pretty great, it's a nice place to go for lunch or on breaks. Normally I'll go elsewhere for nightlife but it seems like they have good stuff on. The food isn't the cheapest however since they've poshed it all up, would deffo recommend the burritos if you're popping in after your interview. Christmas was really good, they got reindeer in and Father Christmas handing out free chocolate, and there's rumours of them getting puppies in for exam stress

    As for disadvantage, it's a yes and no. On the one hand, I haven't covered as much as they have. On the other hand, most of them have forgotten it anyway! Plus you do all of year 1 clinical skills in the summer school, so I've learned those things more recently, and the extra support we get makes it not as big a gap. According to grad course lead, the grads end up at the top end of results at the end of whole second year cohort usually, so if that continues its fine

    As for interview, it depends on the station. Just stay professional and it'll be okay.
    Thanks for the info! - I think I'll definitely grab a burrito afterwards ( I'll just try and avoid getting any on my suit).
    Is there anything you don't like about Liverpool ( part of the course/uni/town)?
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    there's rumours of them getting puppies
    Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

    Where do i sign up?! Sold!
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    (Original post by kethan)
    Thanks for the info! - I think I'll definitely grab a burrito afterwards ( I'll just try and avoid getting any on my suit).
    Is there anything you don't like about Liverpool ( part of the course/uni/town)?
    I think that it'd be helpful if the hospital was more organised about placements, and if we could have drop in sessions for clinical skills, but those are both being worked on in response to it being brought up at SSLC meetings. Additionally I'd like some more resources to revise with, but it's difficult since this is a new course (this is the first set of second year on the CBL version) so they don't have past papers. The town is brilliant, it's an excellent place to study medicine because there's a lot of poor health. Uni wise I think some of the admin was generally better at my old uni, but I prefer Liv Med School's focus on teaching vs research which is a new thing since our new head of school came in.
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    I think that it'd be helpful if the hospital was more organised about placements, and if we could have drop in sessions for clinical skills, but those are both being worked on in response to it being brought up at SSLC meetings. Additionally I'd like some more resources to revise with, but it's difficult since this is a new course (this is the first set of second year on the CBL version) so they don't have past papers. The town is brilliant, it's an excellent place to study medicine because there's a lot of poor health. Uni wise I think some of the admin was generally better at my old uni, but I prefer Liv Med School's focus on teaching vs research which is a new thing since our new head of school came in.
    Thanks again for all the info! I'm actually getting really excited about the prospect of studying there! Is the focus now on research as opposed to teaching then? or vice versa ?
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    (Original post by kethan)
    Thanks again for all the info! I'm actually getting really excited about the prospect of studying there! Is the focus now on research as opposed to teaching then? or vice versa ?
    Focus is on teaching. The lecturers are mainly clinicians, rather than non clinical staff, so they can teach you more of the reality of what you're going to see, rather than going into excessive detail on pathophysiology. You do participate in research here, but it's not as heavily focused on as learning what you need to know for practice.
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    Focus is on teaching. The lecturers are mainly clinicians, rather than non clinical staff, so they can teach you more of the reality of what you're going to see, rather than going into excessive detail on pathophysiology. You do participate in research here, but it's not as heavily focused on as learning what you need to know for practice.
    I'm quite glad it's that way around (I thought there was going to be a bigger focus on research since it's a Russel group uni).
    Are all of your exams at the end of the first year or are they spread throughout the year?
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    (Original post by kethan)
    I'm quite glad it's that way around (I thought there was going to be a bigger focus on research since it's a Russel group uni).
    Are all of your exams at the end of the first year or are they spread throughout the year?
    End of the year. There's 2 exams, plus an OSCE. Communication with simulated patients is assessed throughout the year, and you have doctors assessing your clinical skills with patients while you're on placement.

    We have end of block assessments, but they're formative and to give us an idea of what can be asked and how deep we need to go (this is difficult - breadth is more key than depth in this). There's also a mock OSCE, plus a mock formative test coming in february, so you're aware of where you're up to and what you need to focus on.

    Oh, and one thing I feel liverpool really sets itself apart on is how many books it has digitised! Need a book? It's probably available online through the library, no need to go out in the rain usually
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    End of the year. There's 2 exams, plus an OSCE. Communication with simulated patients is assessed throughout the year, and you have doctors assessing your clinical skills with patients while you're on placement.

    We have end of block assessments, but they're formative and to give us an idea of what can be asked and how deep we need to go (this is difficult - breadth is more key than depth in this). There's also a mock OSCE, plus a mock formative test coming in february, so you're aware of where you're up to and what you need to focus on.

    Oh, and one thing I feel liverpool really sets itself apart on is how many books it has digitised! Need a book? It's probably available online through the library, no need to go out in the rain usually
    That sounds like a pretty good way of teaching ( with a bunch of formatives throughout the year). With the digitised books, have you had to buy many/any books yourself ? or is the library sufficient ?
    Also, how do you find the teaching style? (assuming you were taught in a traditional lecture based style for your original degree)

    Sorry for the bombardment of questions and thanks for answering all of them too!
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    (Original post by kethan)
    That sounds like a pretty good way of teaching ( with a bunch of formatives throughout the year). With the digitised books, have you had to buy many/any books yourself ? or is the library sufficient ?
    Also, how do you find the teaching style? (assuming you were taught in a traditional lecture based style for your original degree)

    Sorry for the bombardment of questions and thanks for answering all of them too!
    I bought one book, which is the one for the summer school. I'm considering buying 2 more, but they're available in the library, I just want them to scribble notes on really. The library should definitely be sufficient.

    I went to another RG for my previous degree and think it's great that the teaching varies. You've got traditional lectures for a lot of content, small group to go through CBL and for simulated patients, a slightly larger group to present CBL, a group of about 30 for anatomy sessions and groups of about 15 for clinical skills.

    It means that there's a way to catch if you're up to speed with everyone else, for things like clinical skills you're able to be observed and know you're doing it right, enough prosections to go around in anatomy. In addition, all the learning outcomes are laid out so you can use whichever style you want to achieve them.
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    I bought one book, which is the one for the summer school. I'm considering buying 2 more, but they're available in the library, I just want them to scribble notes on really. The library should definitely be sufficient.

    I went to another RG for my previous degree and think it's great that the teaching varies. You've got traditional lectures for a lot of content, small group to go through CBL and for simulated patients, a slightly larger group to present CBL, a group of about 30 for anatomy sessions and groups of about 15 for clinical skills.

    It means that there's a way to catch if you're up to speed with everyone else, for things like clinical skills you're able to be observed and know you're doing it right, enough prosections to go around in anatomy. In addition, all the learning outcomes are laid out so you can use whichever style you want to achieve them.
    That all sounds really great- good to know that the change in teaching style isn't too bad! Don't think I have any other questions that I can think of really - thank you for going through all of them in such great detail as well !!
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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    I bought one book, which is the one for the summer school. I'm considering buying 2 more, but they're available in the library, I just want them to scribble notes on really. The library should definitely be sufficient.

    I went to another RG for my previous degree and think it's great that the teaching varies. You've got traditional lectures for a lot of content, small group to go through CBL and for simulated patients, a slightly larger group to present CBL, a group of about 30 for anatomy sessions and groups of about 15 for clinical skills.

    It means that there's a way to catch if you're up to speed with everyone else, for things like clinical skills you're able to be observed and know you're doing it right, enough prosections to go around in anatomy. In addition, all the learning outcomes are laid out so you can use whichever style you want to achieve them.
    Honestly all yore responses have been amazing! Thank you so much. Sounds like a really well put together course especially with the research element.

    I went to Liverpool for my undergrad and did physiology which heavily researched based, I loved it but it wasn't what I wanted.

    What happens in terms of accommodation? Do you live with other grad mess or in halls? Thanks again!


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    (Original post by SpringNicht)
    I bought one book, which is the one for the summer school. I'm considering buying 2 more, but they're available in the library, I just want them to scribble notes on really. The library should definitely be sufficient.

    I went to another RG for my previous degree and think it's great that the teaching varies. You've got traditional lectures for a lot of content, small group to go through CBL and for simulated patients, a slightly larger group to present CBL, a group of about 30 for anatomy sessions and groups of about 15 for clinical skills.

    It means that there's a way to catch if you're up to speed with everyone else, for things like clinical skills you're able to be observed and know you're doing it right, enough prosections to go around in anatomy. In addition, all the learning outcomes are laid out so you can use whichever style you want to achieve them.
    Thank you so much for all your help! Fingers crossed for an offer
 
 
 
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