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Regret doing my degree - any other mature students feel the same? Watch

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    I did Geography at KCL, if i knew I would have done better at A-level first time round and done something entirely different. Going back to uni at 26 is painful to do another undergraduate degree.
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    Some people like giving others stick for their choices in life to make them feel better. I really wouldn't worry about it.

    One thing that helps me is to recognise that when I chose my degrees I was a different person with different perceptions of myself and the world and I made a decision on what to study based on that even though it doesn't correlate with who I am and where I'm at with it today. In this respect I have forgiven myself and this is helping me to move forward.

    In terms of personal growth and having a good time, a degree is nothing to regret. It's just that these days it's not always a direct route into employment/a specific career.
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    I honestly feel like I'm at a disadvantage by not having a degree because a lot of jobs want you to have one now even if it isn't related to the job. I'm sure you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by RachaelBee)
    I honestly feel like I'm at a disadvantage by not having a degree because a lot of jobs want you to have one now even if it isn't related to the job. I'm sure you'll be fine.
    Theres no reason why you can't get one, i believe there is a degree for everyone. There must be something your passionate about.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Theres no reason why you can't get one, i believe there is a degree for everyone. There must be something your passionate about.
    I'm applying to uni to do biomedical science, it's just something that I've observed whilst I've been working.
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    (Original post by RachaelBee)
    I'm applying to uni to do biomedical science, it's just something that I've observed whilst I've been working.
    Oo nice, I think university is best served for mid twenties. At least you have a better indication of working life and a career path. Rather then be told at school what is a realistic expectation.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Oo nice, I think university is best served for mid twenties. At least you have a better indication of working life and a career path. Rather then be told at school what is a realistic expectation.
    Absolutely, I would never have picked my course whilst at school; I worked as a biomedical support worker which is how I found my passion.
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    (Original post by Dragonfly07)
    Yeah I graduated with a 2:1 and I'm not thrilled either.

    I mean I'm glad I have a degree, but I feel I could have used those 3 years a bit more productively if I really wanted to.
    What degree did you do if you don't mind?
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    Think of it as a great learning and social experience, often employers go for the fact that you have the staying power to complete your studies, they are not too worried about what you actually did.
    Stop worrying about what might happen, and concentrate on what makes you a fantastic asset to the employer you want to work for, then go sock it to them! You know you can do it! Very best of luck
    Thought about apprenticeship? They are often the route to much bigger and better things, might not be top dollar initially but often lead to promotion.
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    (Original post by Spindley)
    Think of it as a great learning and social experience, often employers go for the fact that you have the staying power to complete your studies, they are not too worried about what you actually did.
    Stop worrying about what might happen, and concentrate on what makes you a fantastic asset to the employer you want to work for, then go sock it to them! You know you can do it! Very best of luck
    Thought about apprenticeship? They are often the route to much bigger and better things, might not be top dollar initially but often lead to promotion.
    Im too old to do an apprenticeship. Thanks for the suggestion though.
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    (Original post by gemmam)
    Im too old to do an apprenticeship. Thanks for the suggestion though.
    I wouldn't have thought that you have messed up your chances of getting a job by doing a degree. Perhaps you just feel that you chose the wrong subject. Nevertheless I'm sure that there are some usable skills gained from your degree that can be applied to many jobs such as self motivation, teamwork, etc.

    I am 32 and just finishing my first degree so one must be positive
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    When did you decide you wanted to be a Viking?


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    (Original post by wg99)
    I wouldn't have thought that you have messed up your chances of getting a job by doing a degree. Perhaps you just feel that you chose the wrong subject. Nevertheless I'm sure that there are some usable skills gained from your degree that can be applied to many jobs such as self motivation, teamwork, etc.

    I am 32 and just finishing my first degree so one must be positive
    Yeah I think thats it, I wasn't happy with my choice. I did seriously consider dropping out at one point but was talked out of it. Good luck with your degree.

    (Original post by SerLorasTyrell)
    When did you decide you wanted to be a Viking?


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    I didn't do Viking Studies.

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    Unless you are applying for jobs that require a degree in a specific subject then having any degree is usually fine. 2:1 is a good degree! When you apply for jobs make sure you give full details of the skills and experience you have gained at university. Some examples might be time management, research skills, group working or giving presentations. I have done lots of recruitment and while having a degree is very useful, employers are looking for someone who can do the job, get any work experience you can and make sure you tell prospective employers about that' not just that you have a degree. Good luck with job hunting :-)


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    (Original post by Ftmshk)
    Unless you are applying for jobs that require a degree in a specific subject then having any degree is usually fine. 2:1 is a good degree! When you apply for jobs make sure you give full details of the skills and experience you have gained at university. Some examples might be time management, research skills, group working or giving presentations. I have done lots of recruitment and while having a degree is very useful, employers are looking for someone who can do the job, get any work experience you can and make sure you tell prospective employers about that' not just that you have a degree. Good luck with job hunting :-)


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    Thanks . I already worked for several years prior to my degree and Ive done volunteering too so that shouldn't be too much of a problem for me.

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    I think the overqualified thing is a myth too, so don't be put off for going for things. The jobs market is quite difficult at the moment - you might find that you have to go for more 'junior' posts than you expected ( although this might not be the case if you already have lots of work experience). I recruited several graduates to admin assistant posts and they were excellent appointments.


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    I had a good laugh and drank loads and hung around with gawjus women half my age - so I don't regret my degree at all.
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    (Original post by Ftmshk)
    I think the overqualified thing is a myth too, so don't be put off for going for things. The jobs market is quite difficult at the moment - you might find that you have to go for more 'junior' posts than you expected ( although this might not be the case if you already have lots of work experience). I recruited several graduates to admin assistant posts and they were excellent appointments.


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    It's not a myth. If you are seen to be over qualified it becomes obvious to the employer that their position is only used as a temporary means of sustenance until something better comes along which the potential employee could easily fill. Those with less 'credentials' (should I say) are likely to be a long-term investment.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    It's not a myth. If you are seen to be over qualified it becomes obvious to the employer that their position is only used as a temporary means of sustenance until something better comes along which the potential employee could easily fill. Those with less 'credentials' (should I say) are likely to be a long-term investment.
    Before I started uni I was actually turned down for a filing clerk job because they said I was too over qualified, kind of dreading my chances now I have a degree :sigh:

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    (Original post by gemmam)
    Before I started uni I was actually turned down for a filing clerk job because they said I was too over qualified, kind of dreading my chances now I have a degree :sigh:

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    It's a numbers game. Employment for grads is still looking pretty bleak.
 
 
 
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