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    (Original post by DJMayes)
    Cauliflower also doesn't cause demonstrable differences in attitude and behaviour. I get what you're trying to say but I don't think that's a good analogy.

    To some extents I think the point you're making is an important one. It is fine not to drink, but it is also important to realise that other people will and behave maturely about it. If you treat someone differently because they drink and refuse to socialise with people who are going to drink, then it likely will cause problems socially. If you behave more maturely about it there are no problems.

    I don't personally drink, and I was very much in the attitude of segregating myself from anyone who drank during A Levels. It did not do me any favours socially. At uni the attitude I've adopted has been to draw the line between events where people drink, and events where the goal is to drink, and this has worked out absolutely fine for me.

    Still, when there are events where the goal is to drink it is perfectly fair to have events where the goal is not to. Just don't segregate yourself to them.



    See above (although I don't think I posted here before)
    Events in which getting drunk is explicitly encouraged and condoned are banned anyway by every SU in the country and have been for a decade.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Events in which getting drunk is explicitly encouraged and condoned are banned anyway by every SU in the country and have been for a decade.
    SU events are not the only ones that go on (and in fact I have never been to one, there is widespread apathy towards student politics at my uni and plenty enough events in college). A more clear example is this: I would go to a music night with friends knowing that they would be drinking. I would not go pre-drinking with them for any event and I would not go to any students' drinking party.

    (Unless it is a tea party. Attend one of those every week and love it)
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    The last several posts seem to be driving a wedge between drinkers and non-drinkers. I think we should let both parties be. This thread is simply the non-drinkers's "corner" where non-drinkers can find comfort knowing they are not alone.

    How about stories of how non-drinkers spent their freshers' week? What did you do? Was it difficult to cope with most events involving drinks? Sharing your stories will benefit non-drinkers who are nervous or worried about the upcoming freshers and the next few ones in the years to come.
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    (Original post by showtime42)
    The last several posts seem to be driving a wedge between drinkers and non-drinkers. I think we should let both parties be. This thread is simply the non-drinkers's "corner" where non-drinkers can find comfort knowing they are not alone.

    How about stories of how non-drinkers spent their freshers' week? What did you do? Was it difficult to cope with most events involving drinks? Sharing your stories will benefit non-drinkers who are nervous or worried about the upcoming freshers and the next few ones in the years to come.
    This was not my intention - I was actually warning not to try to drive a wedge between them too much.

    My freshers was potentially not a standard one; I had lectures during freshers week as well as a formal dinner one night. For the others I went to a games night, movie night and hung around with a group of people the other two nights. On three of those were there people drinking, the formal meal and the other two nights, and they were meals out at places like a pub. I had no difficulty at all, and have not yet, as I simply don't go to events (clubbing, drinking heavy parties) where drinking is going to be a focus. There is plenty of other stuff to get on with all the time except for exam term where events tend to become more sparse.
 
 
 
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