Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PQ and jneill I can almost sense the hair being pulled out in exasperation.

    Arcane1729 - have you ever heard the quote: "It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt."?
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    PQ and jneill I can almost sense the hair being pulled out in exasperation.

    Arcane1729 - have you ever heard the quote: "It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt."?
    I'm almost bald... my profile pic is a selfie.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Vanny17)
    No. It makes no difference at all. All that matters is your degree classification and relevance of your subject. After Undergrad, your University counts for absolutely nothing.
    So if a first class graduate from Bolton wants to do a PhD at Oxbridge they'll easily get in then?
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    So if a first class graduate from Bolton wants to do a PhD at Oxbridge they'll easily get in then?
    Easily? No.
    Can a first class graduate from Lancaster easily get in to do a PhD? No.
    Can a first class graduate from UCL easily get in to do a PhD? No.

    Average PhD offer rate at Cambridge for UK applicants is approx 1 in 3. So no one gets in "easily".

    They can all apply and be considered along with everyone else. The last thing that Oxbridge is worried about is their prior university.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    Comparing exam papers without comparing marking schemes/levels, coursework content/marking and the algorithm for determining degree classification is again making a judgement without the full information. It's like judging which person is tallest based on their shirt size.
    Ok I see you point but still I think it gives an indication of the material the students need to know. I will give you a simple example. At the respectable university in the macroeconomics class you had to use differential equations to solve some problems. In the ex-poly they did not even teach this material.

    They try to substitute a lot of the quantitative parts of economics with qualitative and common sense material. Why is that? Quite simply maths is hard and also many of the lectures were not good enough to teach so complicated things.

    So even If I do not have the marking scheme algorithm I can see what a third year economics students should know in one university versus the other. I can assure you that the ex-poly students will know far less things and will cover much less advanced stuff.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Easily? No.
    Can a first class graduate from Lancaster easily get in to do a PhD? No.
    Can a first class graduate from UCL easily get in to do a PhD? No.

    Average PhD offer rate at Cambridge for UK applicants is approx 1 in 3. So no one gets in "easily".

    They can all apply and be considered along with everyone else. The last thing that Oxbridge is worried about is their prior university.
    I find it very hard to believe that the last thing that Oxbridge is worried about is the prior university.

    Everything matters, your degree, your specialization, your grade and surely but very surely the university in which you did your degree. I mean come on people we know how much more difficult it is to finish a degree in a top ranked university compared to a low ranked ex-poly. Anybody denying this is just lying to himself and others.

    And since there is a difference in difficulty in finishing the degree then this will obviously have an effect on admissions to a PhD program or anything else you apply for after your undergraduate degree.
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by ppapanastasiou)
    I find it very hard to believe that the last thing that Oxbridge is worried about is the prior university. .
    You might find it hard to believe but it's still the case.

    You could even say that achieving a First at a "lesser" university is quite an accomplishment and would be seen favourably.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ppapanastasiou)
    I find it very hard to believe that the last thing that Oxbridge is worried about is the prior university.

    Everything matters, your degree, your specialization, your grade and surely but very surely the university in which you did your degree. I mean come on people we know how much more difficult it is to finish a degree in a top ranked university compared to a low ranked ex-poly. Anybody denying this is just lying to himself and others.

    And since there is a difference in difficulty in finishing the degree then this will obviously have an effect on admissions to a PhD program or anything else you apply for after your undergraduate degree.
    PhD entry is much more like applying for a job than undergrad and Masters applications. You need to be the right person for the specified research project. At somewhere like Cambridge, meeting the application requirement in terms of your grade, is just the starting point. You could have a 1st from UCL and still be useless for a PhD project, and be rejected before short-listing.

    You need to have two excellent academic references, write a top notch application which demonstrates your suitability for that specific project, and if short-listed, carry off an interview and/or presentation like a champ. If you can deliver all of this, the name of your undergrad uni is entirely irrelevant.

    Nobody would be rejected from a PhD shortlist solely based on the name of their previous uni. By the same token, nobody would get shortlisted solely based on being from a top-flight uni.

    Source: I've attended Oxford, a Russel Group and post-82 uni and studied to PhD level, currently working in a uni.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Mistletoe)
    Do employers or admissions for Masters/PhD people even care where you got it?
    not at all. they just care if u have a 2:1 or above and how your applications are.

    I know plenty of people who went to nottingham trent and they did masters in places like UCL, Nottingham, Kings, Birmingham
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Klix88)
    PhD entry is much more like applying for a job than undergrad and Masters applications. You need to be the right person for the specified research project. At somewhere like Cambridge, meeting the application requirement in terms of your grade, is just the starting point. You could have a 1st from UCL and still be useless for a PhD project, and be rejected before short-listing.

    You need to have two excellent academic references, write a top notch application which demonstrates your suitability for that specific project, and if short-listed, carry off an interview and/or presentation like a champ. If you can deliver all of this, the name of your undergrad uni is entirely irrelevant.

    Nobody would be rejected from a PhD shortlist solely based on the name of their previous uni. By the same token, nobody would get shortlisted solely based on being from a top-flight uni.

    Source: I've attended Oxford, a Russel Group and post-82 uni and studied to PhD level, currently working in a uni.
    PRSOM, especially the "like a job application" bit

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    15
    Of course it does.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    only to a point.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    You might find it hard to believe but it's still the case.

    You could even say that achieving a First at a "lesser" university is quite an accomplishment and would be seen favourably.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ok the arrogance of your reply left me with no sleep so I did the following. I contacted a professor who I knew very good from my former university (which is a well reputable university). The professor is in charge for the PhD entry and she used to decide previously also for the MSc. entry, she told me the following.

    While many things are taken into consideration for a PhD entry, university reputation is also something we heavily look into. Depending on the course the admission team may assign a different subjective weighting to the reputation of the university.

    So in short university reputation does count both for MSc. entry as well as for PhD entry.

    So before you make such arrogant statements "jneill from TSR support team" the first thing you should do is to question academics, so actually people who take these decisions, from well reputable universities and see what they have to say about all this.

    And once more I am not saying that university repuations is the only thing that counts and I do acknowelddge that someone with a First from a "lesser" university could be seen favorably, but stating that it plays no role whatsoever is a gross over simplification and at best misleading.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yes it does. Examples include degrees in Law and Medicine related fields.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Yes and no are the answers.

    A degree from Oxbridge will always be highly sought after because it is universally known to be hard to achieve. Same with universities like Kings college, UCL etc.

    I personally know someone with a Bsc from Brunel, Masters at Imperial and now on to medical degree number three.

    Apples and oranges- just do what is best for you.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ppapanastasiou)
    Ok the arrogance of your reply left me with no sleep so I did the following. I contacted a professor who I knew very good from my former university (which is a well reputable university). The professor is in charge for the PhD entry and she used to decide previously also for the MSc. entry, she told me the following.

    While many things are taken into consideration for a PhD entry, university reputation is also something we heavily look into. Depending on the course the admission team may assign a different subjective weighting to the reputation of the university.

    So in short university reputation does count both for MSc. entry as well as for PhD entry.

    So before you make such arrogant statements "jneill from TSR support team" the first thing you should do is to question academics, so actually people who take these decisions, from well reputable universities and see what they have to say about all this.

    And once more I am not saying that university repuations is the only thing that counts and I do acknowelddge that someone with a First from a "lesser" university could be seen favorably, but stating that it plays no role whatsoever is a gross over simplification and at best misleading.
    jneill is an extremely well respected, thoughtful and knowledgeable member here whose considered, researched and well-evidenced posts have done a huge amount to dispel myths about Oxbridge applications and encourage those who wouldn't otherwise dream of applying to 'give it a go'.

    You, on the other hand, are spouting bilge. One anecdotal conversation with a 'professor' from one university does not a trend make. Read the comments above: from those who know, rather than think they know - those who have gone through the process and have studied for a Ph.D. at Oxbridge.

    I will add to this - the university at which you did your undergrad is, by and large, totally irrelevant to your chances of being accepted onto a Ph.D. programme. Prior experience of research, clear aims and a focussed research proposal closely allied to the project on offer, excellent references - these are the important things.

    Source - undergrad and Ph.D at Cambridge. One of our group had done Biochemistry at a plate-glass uni...
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by ppapanastasiou)
    I contacted a professor who I knew very good from my former university (which is a well reputable university). The professor is in charge for the PhD entry and she used to decide previously also for the MSc. entry, she told me the following...
    Ask her if she has rejected an otherwise good applicant because of their prior university.

    And I'm sorry to be the cause of your lack of sleep. That's not the intention...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Well, if I were an employer, I would much rather hire someone who got a first from a lesser known university, than hire someone who barely passed their degree from Cambridge.
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by CobaltRose96)
    Well, if I were an employer, I would much rather hire someone who got a first from a lesser known university, than hire someone who barely passed their degree from Cambridge.
    This is a very good point.

    Choosing to study and continue with a degree that you are "barely passing" demonstrates very poor judgement or decision making. Unless the poor performance was for good reason (health issues/bereavement) I'd be very wary of employing someone who kept flogging a dead horse.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    jneill is an extremely well respected, thoughtful and knowledgeable member here whose considered, researched and well-evidenced posts have done a huge amount to dispel myths about Oxbridge applications and encourage those who wouldn't otherwise dream of applying to 'give it a go'.

    You, on the other hand, are spouting bilge. One anecdotal conversation with a 'professor' from one university does not a trend make. Read the comments above: from those who know, rather than think they know - those who have gone through the process and have studied for a Ph.D. at Oxbridge.

    I will add to this - the university at which you did your undergrad is, by and large, totally irrelevant to your chances of being accepted onto a Ph.D. programme. Prior experience of research, clear aims and a focussed research proposal closely allied to the project on offer, excellent references - these are the important things.

    Source - undergrad and Ph.D at Cambridge. One of our group had done Biochemistry at a plate-glass uni...
    Yes a plate glass university. But how many people do you find from ex-polys doing a PhD or studying at a Masters in Oxbridge.

    I am sorry but you are not convincing me. Surely common sense tells you that University choice as well as many other things are considered, EVERYTHING counts.

    Its like dating, height for men (and probably also for women) is important, denying this means denying the obvious. This does not mean that it is the only thing women look at (they would be very superficial if they did so) but it is one of the things as well as many others (like humor, personality etc.).
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

1,436

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Keele University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 19 Aug '18
  2. University of Melbourne
    Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 19 Aug '18
  3. Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Undergraduate
    Tue, 21 Aug '18
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.