cogman
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Hi all, I am currently in year 11 and being asked to fill out the application form for my sixth form. I was considering doing computer science as a degree, but is it worth the three years, am I even guarantee'd and job after this? Thanks.
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MylesXD
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(Original post by cogman)
Hi all, I am currently in year 11 and being asked to fill out the application form for my sixth form. I was considering doing computer science as a degree, but is it worth the three years, am I even guarantee'd and job after this? Thanks.
No your not guarantee why do you think you are? However their is demand for Computer Science
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jb9191
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Rated the 4th best degree in America to obtain, even amongst institutes like Harvard and MIT.

As its a broad subject upon graduation you'll be able to apply for almost every computer based job plus if you're maths is good (some courses teach a lot more maths than others so this is worth checking out before applying with a university) you may also land a job with a banking firm. There are a variety of jobs linked with the degree - web designer/developer, software engineer, project manager, network administrator, etc..

Here is a full list of information related to Computer Science - as you can see from the graph - the demand for CS graduates has flown up, as it has across the globe, which is expected considering almost every industry now uses computers and interactivity and simpler communication will be the future.

http://www.itjobswatch.co.uk/jobs/uk...r%20science.do

The average starting salary in the UK is £40,000 including London, £35,000 excluding London. This is rising faster than the increase on other jobs in the UK. Some salaries go upto around £80,000.

10% of jobs in CS offer a salary of more than £70,000. Obviously you need to be well qualified or have a lot of experience to demand for such a high wage, as in any other sector.

Down below you can see how what skills are most in demand. Which are the most wanted programming languages for a possible employee to have.

Java, C++, C#, SQL, C, JavaScript, PERL, PHP, Python make up the majority. (I'd assume every Computer Science course in the UK teaches either Java, C# or C++ - more than likely the 3 of them. If not then learn them in your own time. It'll only prepare you for the future better and once you get an understanding of algorithms and putting coding into practice then moving from one to the other may not be as difficult).


You'll also see a list of job titles possible for CS graduates.

In my opinion, as I'm doing it myself in September, it can be very rewarding but its going to depend on whether or not you put the effort into learning the stuff to get the rewards at the end of it. Dedication is key, like anything else in life.

As its also very highly regarded world wide you're not only limited to getting a job here either. It opens up a lot of possibilities and you could set up your own business in a certain field - web design, graphics design etc..

Its entirely upto you. If your committed then do it. If not then maybe something else which you're more committed to is for you. All the best.

PS. Also, as the person above said, you're not guaranteed a job. You're not guaranteed a job in any sector in life. The only way you'll get a good job is through hard work, making sacrifices elsewhere, dedication and a willingness to learn.
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Coda
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(Original post by cogman)
Hi all, I am currently in year 11 and being asked to fill out the application form for my sixth form. I was considering doing computer science as a degree, but is it worth the three years, am I even guarantee'd and job after this? Thanks.
It doesn't guarantee you a job, but it's a good degree to have. You'll be very skilled in working with computers, and if you go to a decent university they'll also ensure that your maths ability is up to scratch. This means that you're capable of working in a wide range of industries.
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cogman
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Summing all this up, which universities would be the best to attend to study this course?
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jb9191
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(Original post by cogman)
Summing all this up, which universities would be the best to attend to study this course?
Anywhere in the top half of the rankings table in the UK.

I hate all this stigma about best University and what not. The majority of the time, its nothing to do what facilities are available or what the reputation of the university is, its to do with how much effort you put in yourself to gain the most information and increase your own knowledge of the subject.

You could go to most universities and learn algorithms in an advanced way but they may only teach you C++ or Java. That doesn't stop you from learning other languages in your own time does it? You're only ever limited by your own willingness to learn.

Put the effort in, work hard for 3 or 4 years (if not doing masters) and then you'll get the rewards afterwards.

If you go to an interview and say that the university course was limited and didn't meet your needs so you self taught outside of class to improve your ability then they are going to think more highly of you.

No degree guarantees you anything. Yes a certain university may have better facilities but every other university in the UK offering Computer Science must have a minimum standard available to be able to offer such a course.

Its up to you to go down one of these paths.

  • Work hard, learn as much as you can whether that means self teaching as well.
  • Do enough to get the top grades without pushing yourself to reach your max potential
  • Don't really bother


How much do you really want it?
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cogman
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Want?!, More like NEED :P
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Dirac Delta Function
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(Original post by cogman)
Summing all this up, which universities would be the best to attend to study this course?
Cambridge, not-Cambridge, Gimperial, Bristol, Southampton, Edinburgh.
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TheQueenOfComputerScience
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(Original post by jb9191)
The average starting salary in the UK is £40,000 including London, £35,000 excluding London. This is rising faster than the increase on other jobs in the UK.
lol. Try average finishing salary. Also major lol at rising salarys, they basicly haven't changed since the 80's.

I'd say you are pretty much guaranteed A job in industry regardless of what University you go to or what grade you get but it might not necessarily be a good one.
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jb9191
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(Original post by TheQueenOfComputerScience)
lol. Try average finishing salary. Also major lol at rising salarys, they basicly haven't changed since the 80's.

I'd say you are pretty much guaranteed A job in industry regardless of what University you go to or what grade you get but it might not necessarily be a good one.
Where do you work?

My uncle works as a software engineer in London and is on a salary of £78,000 a year, before tax obviously. Hes obviously older now but his starting salary was pretty decent for around the time he graduated.

Plus my cousin, who has just finished a Computer Science degree at Glasgow has already landed a job in Manchester with a firm he did his year in placement with. Not sure exactly what his role is titled as, i'll have to ask, but hes earning above the average graduate salary. I'm sure hes on about £27,000 per annum.

It all depends on what roles you go for as well. Some are better paid than others and some lead to promotions quicker than others. It'll also depend what else you have to offer a prospective employer as well. If you just go in with a piece of paper to an interview and say 'here's my grades' without any physical evidence to back it up, like a portfolio or website showing your work then its unlikely you'll get a good starting job. The more effort you put into it then thats likely to reflect in the role you obtain.

Add a sandwich year to your course and your employability prospects increase again once that year has been completed.

Even here, for a junior web designer in London, the starting salary offered is £27,000 + benefits. It all depends on what sacrifices you are willing to take to get the job you want.

http://jobs.trovit.co.uk/jobs/starti...raduate-london

Experience is key so anything you do during university you should keep in a portfolio to show prospective employers. The university I am going to, according to unistats has 90% of students who've studied computer science in a graduate job. I know statistics alone don't mean much because most of the time its down to each individual case when looking for employability but the course must be very good to be getting 9/10 of its graduates into graduate jobs.
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TheQueenOfComputerScience
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(Original post by jb9191)
Where do you work?
I don't I am doing a PhD.

(Original post by jb9191)
but hes earning above the average graduate salary. I'm sure hes on about £27,000 per annum.
Thats fair enough, thats not far off what I am on in my PhD and what a good graduate should be looking for. It was just the post I was laughing at said that the "average starting salary" is £35,000 which is just false!

(Original post by jb9191)
Even here, for a junior web designer in London, the starting salary offered is £27,000 + benefits. It all depends on what sacrifices you are willing to take to get the job you want.
Sounds nice but my husband worked in London on a much higher salary many years ago when living was cheaper and struggled to get by.

(Original post by jb9191)
The university I am going to, according to unistats has 90% of students who've studied computer science in a graduate job.
I would say that's definatly true, I don't know of anyone from my degree who isn't in a graduate position and some of them were just downright useless and got terrible degrees! However, some of those positions are paying not a huge amount more than minmum wage.

I agree its down to the individual to make their own way and there are good jobs out there but just remember its a hard world, salarys are low and they don't rise enough. I don't know where these average figures are coming from but they are definatly biased stats. Just work hard at University, get a first, get experience and try and get into a good job from the start as it sets the standard and its difficult to get a good job after having been at a crap one.
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jb9191
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(Original post by TheQueenOfComputerScience)
I don't I am doing a PhD.

Cool. Where to you studying?

Thats fair enough, thats not far off what I am on in my PhD and what a good graduate should be looking for. It was just the post I was laughing at said that the "average starting salary" is £35,000 which is just false!

Sorry, you're right. It says average salary and not average starting salary.

Sounds nice but my husband worked in London on a much higher salary many years ago when living was cheaper and struggled to get by.

I agree. London can be extremely costly as most students who study there will find out just how much of a financial strain it can be. I think if one really excels on the course and gets a very good understanding of programming, maybe web design and other areas then setting up a business may be the way to go. Yes it may be much tougher with the competition out there but having your own company earlier can really set you up for the future, if you plan it correctly.

I would say that's definatly true, I don't know of anyone from my degree who isn't in a graduate position and some of them were just downright useless and got terrible degrees! However, some of those positions are paying not a huge amount more than minmum wage.

Agreed. Especially considering the competition. More competition means companies can offer lower salaries as people will want to snap them up regardless just to get money coming in and to gain invaluable experience.

I agree its down to the individual to make their own way and there are good jobs out there but just remember its a hard world, salarys are low and they don't rise enough. I don't know where these average figures are coming from but they are definatly biased stats. Just work hard at University, get a first, get experience and try and get into a good job from the start as it sets the standard and its difficult to get a good job after having been at a crap one.
Agreed on all points. It wasn't the sources error, it was mine. The source is more than likely correct as it says the average salary and not the average starting salary I initially thought it said. Any sector in the world is hard to get into. As someone who is more than likely going to move abroad after my 4 years in university I'm not too bothered as salaries offered elsewhere in the world are a lot more decent, less taxed and the cost of living is cheaper. Hopefully I can use my year in industry to get some great experience and then use that to land a job elsewhere.

The starting salary in Germany for a software engineer is around 40-45,000 Euro rising to 50,000 Euro + bonuses (company car etc.) after 2 years experience. In the USA, where my auntie lives its around $60,000. The only issue with that is a lot of MIT graduates go straight into jobs there so the competition is going to be a very high level. I'd probably need a few years experience here to even be considered. The good thing about the US is the demand for computer science graduates is going up and up at the moment. Even in eastern europe, the salaries, although they may look lower than here and are in exchange rate terms, they are still very good as the cost of living is lower.

Thats another positive about a computer science degree in the UK. As the UK educational system is regarded highly as is a computer science degree, you have high employability prospects across the world. Plus your not only tied to the computing or IT sector, the financial sector also recruits computer science graduates.
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TheQueenOfComputerScience
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(Original post by jb9191)
[B]Agreed on all points. It wasn't the sources error, it was mine. The source is more than likely correct as it says the average salary and not the average starting salary I initially thought it said.
Fair enough, easily done, i'd say its a reasonably accurate source then, sounds about right to me!

(Original post by jb9191)
In the USA, where my auntie lives its around $60,000. The only issue with that is a lot of MIT graduates go straight into jobs there so the competition is going to be a very high level. I'd probably need a few years experience here to even be considered.
Yea I'm thinking that moving to the US could be a good idea, lower cost of living and higher salaries. Although, it can be hard to get a company to sponser you a visa. I have been told that having a PhD makes it easier as they can move you over as an "expert" but i'm not sure how accurate this information was.
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jb9191
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:confused:
(Original post by TheQueenOfComputerScience)
Fair enough, easily done, i'd say its a reasonably accurate source then, sounds about right to me!



Yea I'm thinking that moving to the US could be a good idea, lower cost of living and higher salaries. Although, it can be hard to get a company to sponser you a visa. I have been told that having a PhD makes it easier as they can move you over as an "expert" but i'm not sure how accurate this information was.

Fairly accurate I've been told, even with an undergraduate degree you can get a sponsor. As then the company may sponsor you to further your education in the US part time, obviously, finance permitting.

The best way I have heard is to get experience in the UK working for a US company and then apply for a L1 Visa, rather than the H1B Visa to get a company transfer which is easier.
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The-Wi$e-One
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CompSci is worth it yes, graduate rates are falling and demand is rising, so draw from that what you want.
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TheQueenOfComputerScience
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(Original post by jb9191)
:confused:


Fairly accurate I've been told, even with an undergraduate degree you can get a sponsor. As then the company may sponsor you to further your education in the US part time, obviously, finance permitting.

The best way I have heard is to get experience in the UK working for a US company and then apply for a L1 Visa, rather than the H1B Visa to get a company transfer which is easier.
Ah yea I remember now, when I was doing my placement at Microsoft Ireland a guy in my team did that and got a transfer to Redmond. I shall consider everything more once I am getting towards the end of this PhD thing I suppose!
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aankhi
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(Original post by TheQueenOfComputerScience)
Yea I'm thinking that moving to the US could be a good idea, lower cost of living and higher salaries. Although, it can be hard to get a company to sponser you a visa. I have been told that having a PhD makes it easier as they can move you over as an "expert" but i'm not sure how accurate this information was.
Note: $60,000 (USD) = £36, 000 ..
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TheQueenOfComputerScience
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(Original post by aankhi)
Note: $60,000 (USD) = £36, 000 ..
Goes further over there and that is a much better starting salary than most of the ones here!
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Ilustrius
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(Original post by jb9191)
Rated the 4th best degree in America to obtain, even amongst institutes like Harvard and MIT.

As its a broad subject upon graduation you'll be able to apply for almost every computer based job plus if you're maths is good (some courses teach a lot more maths than others so this is worth checking out before applying with a university) you may also land a job with a banking firm. There are a variety of jobs linked with the degree - web designer/developer, software engineer, project manager, network administrator, etc..

Here is a full list of information related to Computer Science - as you can see from the graph - the demand for CS graduates has flown up, as it has across the globe, which is expected considering almost every industry now uses computers and interactivity and simpler communication will be the future.

http://www.itjobswatch.co.uk/jobs/uk...r%20science.do

The average starting salary in the UK is £40,000 including London, £35,000 excluding London. This is rising faster than the increase on other jobs in the UK. Some salaries go upto around £80,000.

10% of jobs in CS offer a salary of more than £70,000. Obviously you need to be well qualified or have a lot of experience to demand for such a high wage, as in any other sector.

Down below you can see how what skills are most in demand. Which are the most wanted programming languages for a possible employee to have.

Java, C++, C#, SQL, C, JavaScript, PERL, PHP, Python make up the majority. (I'd assume every Computer Science course in the UK teaches either Java, C# or C++ - more than likely the 3 of them. If not then learn them in your own time. It'll only prepare you for the future better and once you get an understanding of algorithms and putting coding into practice then moving from one to the other may not be as difficult).


You'll also see a list of job titles possible for CS graduates.

In my opinion, as I'm doing it myself in September, it can be very rewarding but its going to depend on whether or not you put the effort into learning the stuff to get the rewards at the end of it. Dedication is key, like anything else in life.

As its also very highly regarded world wide you're not only limited to getting a job here either. It opens up a lot of possibilities and you could set up your own business in a certain field - web design, graphics design etc..

Its entirely upto you. If your committed then do it. If not then maybe something else which you're more committed to is for you. All the best.

PS. Also, as the person above said, you're not guaranteed a job. You're not guaranteed a job in any sector in life. The only way you'll get a good job is through hard work, making sacrifices elsewhere, dedication and a willingness to learn.
You might want to consult your link again. The moment I saw your figure I immediately knew it was dubious.
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TCA2b
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(Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
Cambridge, not-Cambridge, Gimperial, Bristol, Southampton, Edinburgh.
Glasgow, St Andrews and Birmingham also tend to rank well in the subject.
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