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What masters degree can you do with an undergrad in French and Spanish?

I want to know which masters degrees i can apply for with a french and spanish undergrad, does it have to be language related?
Original post by Confusionn
I want to know which masters degrees i can apply for with a french and spanish undergrad, does it have to be language related?


The default master's for MFL graduates tend to be linguistics.

Having said that, you can always do master's in subjects that accept undergrads in any subject (so long you have the grades), which includes:

Computer science (some degrees)

Anything in business (except for finance) e.g. marketing, accounting. You cannot do a business management degree if you have done it at undergrad

Anthropology

Nursing

Some criminology degrees

Nonquantiative economics degrees

Some film degrees

Hospitality

Some media degrees

Some journalism degrees

Education - PGCE with QTS for teaching, but you can also get MA and MEd in Education.

Linguistics

Social work

Some politics degrees

Some agriculture degrees

Some fine art degrees



If you want to go into specific areas of research not listed above, you would need to look into doing a conversion course prior to enrolling into the respective master's degree. These subjects include:

Economics (for quantitative degrees)

Law

Psychology

Computer science (if you want to look into advanced computer science)

There are other conversion courses for other subjects, but they are often for subjects within a similar discipline. For example, conversion courses within life sciences are suitable if you have an undergrad in a life science subject; conversion courses in physics and engineering are suitable if you have an undergrad in physics or engineering.

Instead of picking any random master's degree to do, I think it's more appropriate to ask why you want to do a master's because it makes no sense to do another degree when you don't need it. If you do a master's, it's usually with some purpose in mind as opposed to just getting another qualification.

If you think getting a master's would help your employment prospects, it usually doesn't unless it's in a regulated field where you would legally need a specific type of degree to get in e.g. nursing, psychology. If it's not a legal requirement, then you're very likely wasting money and time.
(edited 5 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by MindMax2000
The default master's for MFL graduates tend to be linguistics.

Having said that, you can always do master's in subjects that accept undergrads in any subject (so long you have the grades), which includes:

Computer science (some degrees)

Anything in business (except for finance) e.g. marketing, accounting. You cannot do a business management degree if you have done it at undergrad

Anthropology

Nursing

Some criminology degrees

Nonquantiative economics degrees

Some film degrees

Hospitality

Some media degrees

Some journalism degrees

Education - PGCE with QTS for teaching, but you can also get MA and MEd in Education.

Linguistics

Social work

Some politics degrees

Some agriculture degrees

Some fine art degrees



If you want to go into specific areas of research not listed above, you would need to look into doing a conversion course prior to enrolling into the respective master's degree. These subjects include:

Economics (for quantitative degrees)

Law

Psychology

Computer science (if you want to look into advanced computer science)

There are other conversion courses for other subjects, but they are often for subjects within a similar discipline. For example, conversion courses within life sciences are suitable if you have an undergrad in a life science subject; conversion courses in physics and engineering are suitable if you have an undergrad in physics or engineering.

Instead of picking any random master's degree to do, I think it's more appropriate to ask why you want to do a master's because it makes no sense to do another degree when you don't need it. If you do a master's, it's usually with some purpose in mind as opposed to just getting another qualification.

If you think getting a master's would help your employment prospects, it usually doesn't unless it's in a regulated field where you would legally need a specific type of degree to get in e.g. nursing, psychology. If it's not a legal requirement, then you're very likely wasting money and time.


Thanks for the reply. :smile: Is this the same for an undergrad in History? Also, do all computer science master’s degrees allow people from any undergrad onto a comp sci masters?
Original post by Confusionn
Thanks for the reply. :smile: Is this the same for an undergrad in History? Also, do all computer science master’s degrees allow people from any undergrad onto a comp sci masters?


To avoid sounding like a broken record, yes.

Strictly speaking, an undergrad in history is typically required for a master's in history. Otherwise you can apply for a master's in any subject that accept undergrads in any subject (the same list as that above, including linguisitics).

Not all computer science postgrads accept people from any undergrad (I did specify some degrees). e.g.
The following accept undergrads from any subject so long you have high enough grades:
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught-degrees/computer-science-msc
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/taught/computer-science/computer-science.aspx
https://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2023/taught-postgraduate-courses/msc-computer-science/
https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/eng/msc-computer-science-conversion/

The following do not:
https://www.essex.ac.uk/courses/pg00435/1/msc-advanced-computer-science (the title gives it away)
https://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/coursefinder/courses/computer-science-msc/
https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/degrees/index.php?r=site/view&id=110
https://www.southampton.ac.uk/courses/computer-science-masters-msc#entry

I do not fancy scouring the entire internet to list out all of the degrees you can and cannot apply for with specific undergrads if I don't need to (especially without AI). If you have anything specific that you want to ask, feel free to ask.
Reply 4
Thank you so much, you have been a great help! :smile:

I am going to be starting a degree in French and Spanish this October at Cardiff University.

I do plan on eventually doing a PHD at a top uni like UCL, LSE, Oxbridge or abroad in the US or Canada. I was recently told by a family friend - who teaches at a uni but isn’t a lecturer or professor - that because I am doing my undergrad at a Welsh University (Cardiff University) that it will be harder than if I went to an English university to apply for PHD funding or getting onto a PHD course in general. I’m not sure what to do with this information (as he said it very out of the blue ) and how I can be competitive enough to get onto a PHD programme if going to a Welsh uni will “hinder” me in applying to English universities for PHDs.

Do you perhaps know what he meant by this as he wasn’t very clear in what he was saying?

Thanks again :smile:
Original post by Confusionn
Thank you so much, you have been a great help! :smile:

I am going to be starting a degree in French and Spanish this October at Cardiff University.

I do plan on eventually doing a PHD at a top uni like UCL, LSE, Oxbridge or abroad in the US or Canada. I was recently told by a family friend - who teaches at a uni but isn’t a lecturer or professor - that because I am doing my undergrad at a Welsh University (Cardiff University) that it will be harder than if I went to an English university to apply for PHD funding or getting onto a PHD course in general. I’m not sure what to do with this information (as he said it very out of the blue ) and how I can be competitive enough to get onto a PHD programme if going to a Welsh uni will “hinder” me in applying to English universities for PHDs.

Do you perhaps know what he meant by this as he wasn’t very clear in what he was saying?

Thanks again :smile:

It's the first time that I have heard about the PhD funding between Welsh and English universities. As I have not applied for a PhD yet, I can't give you a second qualified opinion on this.

To my knowledge though, where you did your undergrad and/or master's shouldn't be too much of a factor so long it's from a respected uni for top end unis. Most other unis are just asking for grades, a good personal statement, and research proposal. Some might ask for a grad admissions test i.e. GRE or GMAT, but that's a select few in the UK (it's more common in the US). You would have to look at the entry requirements for the specific PhD programmes that you want to do to be sure.

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