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    Hi, Hope everyone is enjoying the festive period,

    Looking for some advice please,

    I'm a 23 year old guy, i left school at 16 and have been working as a carpenter ever since. Over the last couple of years I've taken a real interest in economics and would love to be able to study it at university. So I've recently decided to start self studying a-level maths, economics and government+politics. I'd ideally like to have 3 full a-levels in time to start uni in sept 2014. I've rented my flat out and moved back in with my parents so I can commit to this full time.

    I'd like to know if this is feasible given the amount of time between now and the exams in June 2014. Including the fact that there isn't going to be any exams in the January. My intentions are to do all 4 of the economics and politics as-level exams this June coming (2013), taken the remainder of the exams for all three subjects in one go in June 2014. Is this doable?

    Also could someone recommend which exam boards to use for these subjects? Considering that im self studying i will need to use the exam board that has the best textbooks, study guides, online material etc.

    Sorry for going on a bit but if anyone could help me with this I'd really appreciate it.
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Hi, Hope everyone is enjoying the festive period,

    Looking for some advice please,

    I'm a 23 year old guy, i left school at 16 and have been working as a carpenter ever since. Over the last couple of years I've taken a real interest in economics and would love to be able to study it at university. So I've recently decided to start self studying a-level maths, economics and government+politics. I'd ideally like to have 3 full a-levels in time to start uni in sept 2014. I've rented my flat out and moved back in with my parents so I can commit to this full time.

    I'd like to know if this is feasible given the amount of time between now and the exams in June 2014. Including the fact that there isn't going to be any exams in the January. My intentions are to do all 4 of the economics and politics as-level exams this June coming (2013), taken the remainder of the exams for all three subjects in one go in June 2014. Is this doable?

    Also could someone recommend which exam boards to use for these subjects? Considering that im self studying i will need to use the exam board that has the best textbooks, study guides, online material etc.

    Sorry for going on a bit but if anyone could help me with this I'd really appreciate it.
    aqa
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Hi, Hope everyone is enjoying the festive period,

    Looking for some advice please,

    I'm a 23 year old guy, i left school at 16 and have been working as a carpenter ever since. Over the last couple of years I've taken a real interest in economics and would love to be able to study it at university. So I've recently decided to start self studying a-level maths, economics and government+politics. I'd ideally like to have 3 full a-levels in time to start uni in sept 2014. I've rented my flat out and moved back in with my parents so I can commit to this full time.

    I'd like to know if this is feasible given the amount of time between now and the exams in June 2014. Including the fact that there isn't going to be any exams in the January. My intentions are to do all 4 of the economics and politics as-level exams this June coming (2013), taken the remainder of the exams for all three subjects in one go in June 2014. Is this doable?

    Also could someone recommend which exam boards to use for these subjects? Considering that im self studying i will need to use the exam board that has the best textbooks, study guides, online material etc.

    Sorry for going on a bit but if anyone could help me with this I'd really appreciate it.
    Go with edexcel or aqa. Personally I'd choose edexcel.

    given that you have never studied A-levels (left school at 16), have you checked local colleges to see if they'll accept you?

    apparently you'll be funded by the government (just like people doing their a-levels from ages 16-19, because this is your first time, right? anyway check it out, call round colleges. Its not impossible to self-study - it is perfectly doable with the right amount of commitment. But thats just an option if you want, because you can attend classes and have your work marked, but do what you prefer.
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    I would say to go for the easiest exam boards - universities do not care which exam board you sit and some are considerably easier than others. For economics, AQA is by far the easiest and it is also very easy to learn to the exam - there are lots of non-supported multiple choice questions for example. It is widely agreed that the best economics textbooks are 'Anderton' - search it on Amazon. The website tutor2u is also very useful for this. Maths exams tend to be more level but I would say that AQA or Edexcel are likely to be easier than OCR or OCR MEI. This could be difficult to teach yourself though....I tried to self teach A level maths and found it near impossible. MyMaths website is a very useful resource, if you google it its fairly easy to find a login to use for it. For G+P, I don't really know but my guess would be AQA.
    I do think that it is perfectly doable - I coasted through AS and only started revision a few weeks before and came out with 5 As, but I would say that it will be hard work, especially if you havent studied since 16. It is a big step up from GCSE to AS Level, and many underestimate this. For maths there is a really good book called 'bridging the gap' which helps the transition from GCSE to A level. It isn't as much as a problem for economics since most people havent studied it before so it starts off with some very basic concepts.

    Good luck!!!
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    You want to be using a company called UK Open Learning http://www.uk-open-learning.com, which is the A Level equivalent of Open University. You get all the course material necessary, but you may want to buy a extra text book or two. You also get an online tutor who can help with things and you can send him/her practise essays.

    Do your exams through AQA. It's not cheap, but if you've got the dedication it will be so worth it. Best of luck.
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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    Go with edexcel or aqa. Personally I'd choose edexcel.

    given that you have never studied A-levels (left school at 16), have you checked local colleges to see if they'll accept you?

    apparently you'll be funded by the government (just like people doing their a-levels from ages 16-19, because this is your first time, right? anyway check it out, call round colleges. Its not impossible to self-study - it is perfectly doable with the right amount of commitment. But thats just an option if you want, because you can attend classes and have your work marked, but do what you prefer.
    Thanks for the advice man, I've decided to self study as i thought i'd have to pay quite a lot of money to do it any other way, but if im entitled to funding then i might look into that. I'd think i'd stuggle being surrounded by 16-17 year olds at a college though. I do intend to have help from tutors here and there.
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    Consider National Extension College for home learning.
    I would not recommend self study without support of a tutor and a structured curriculum to learn by. It's hard enough with a tutor at the other end of the phone -that's from personal experience.

    I'd snap up any opportunity to get back in to college if I were you. Apparently it can even be payed for by the GOV if your up to 25 and it's your first level 3 qualification (like the poster above me said).
    However, I've been searching and contacting colleges high and low to accommodate me for this, and I am yet to find any regardless of cost. If you find one, let me know!
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    (Original post by 1994_)
    I would say to go for the easiest exam boards - universities do not care which exam board you sit and some are considerably easier than others. For economics, AQA is by far the easiest and it is also very easy to learn to the exam - there are lots of non-supported multiple choice questions for example. It is widely agreed that the best economics textbooks are 'Anderton' - search it on Amazon. The website tutor2u is also very useful for this. Maths exams tend to be more level but I would say that AQA or Edexcel are likely to be easier than OCR or OCR MEI. This could be difficult to teach yourself though....I tried to self teach A level maths and found it near impossible. MyMaths website is a very useful resource, if you google it its fairly easy to find a login to use for it. For G+P, I don't really know but my guess would be AQA.
    I do think that it is perfectly doable - I coasted through AS and only started revision a few weeks before and came out with 5 As, but I would say that it will be hard work, especially if you havent studied since 16. It is a big step up from GCSE to AS Level, and many underestimate this. For maths there is a really good book called 'bridging the gap' which helps the transition from GCSE to A level. It isn't as much as a problem for economics since most people havent studied it before so it starts off with some very basic concepts.

    Good luck!!!
    Thanks for your help, i'll look into the books you've recommended. Yeah i've heard that its a big step up from gcse. However i do have a background knowledge of economics and politics after reading lots of books on the subjects, also reading newspapers and the economist frequently. Im worried i'll struggle with maths though. I can remember being good at it at school but its been so long since ive had to use any of it, i'll have to spend a few months going over even gcse stuff. I do intend on getting a tutor to help me with maths though.
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    (Original post by pmj1991)
    Consider National Extension College for home learning.
    I would not recommend self study without support of a tutor and a structured curriculum to learn by. It's hard enough with a tutor at the other end of the phone -that's from personal experience.

    I'd snap up any opportunity to get back in to college if I were you. Apparently it can even be payed for by the GOV if your up to 25 and it's your first level 3 qualification (like the poster above me said).
    However, I've been searching and contacting colleges high and low to accommodate me for this, and I am yet to find any regardless of cost. If you find one, let me know!
    Yeah i have considered doing a long distance course, but im thinking instead to put the money towards private tutors every now and then. I have taken a look at the specifications on the subjects, and with all the videos, study materials and past papers there are on the internet i think i'd be able to study myself.

    Also theres a private exam centre down the road from me that offer various revision classes, mock exams and general tuition. Im intending to make full use of them aswell.
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Hi, Hope everyone is enjoying the festive period,

    Looking for some advice please,

    I'm a 23 year old guy, i left school at 16 and have been working as a carpenter ever since. Over the last couple of years I've taken a real interest in economics and would love to be able to study it at university. So I've recently decided to start self studying a-level maths, economics and government+politics. I'd ideally like to have 3 full a-levels in time to start uni in sept 2014. I've rented my flat out and moved back in with my parents so I can commit to this full time.

    I'd like to know if this is feasible given the amount of time between now and the exams in June 2014. Including the fact that there isn't going to be any exams in the January. My intentions are to do all 4 of the economics and politics as-level exams this June coming (2013), taken the remainder of the exams for all three subjects in one go in June 2014. Is this doable?

    Also could someone recommend which exam boards to use for these subjects? Considering that im self studying i will need to use the exam board that has the best textbooks, study guides, online material etc.

    Sorry for going on a bit but if anyone could help me with this I'd really appreciate it.
    Edexcel for Maths is most popular - great textbooks too
    Edexcel for Economics seems easy
    Can't speak for Politics

    Edexcel also has a website with lots of past papers, mark schemes, specifications, etc...
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    I did an access course, best thing I ever did. look into it
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    Definitely do Edexcel for Maths. The Edexcel textbooks are brilliant and you get a CD-Rom with them which has the exam cafe and a solution bank which shows you how to do every single question in the textbook! Edexcel also have a LOT of past papers for maths on their website. Try to get access to MathsNet and MyMaths if you can, since these are also extremely helpful! You'd have to do C1, C2, C3, C4 and two applied modules. For economics at uni, I'd recommend doing at least S1, and then either S2, M1 or D1 as your second applied module. S2 would probably be slightly harder than the other two however would probably help you more with Economics, since Mechanics is basically Physics and D1 is algorithms and linear programming, etc (and this module would be difficult to self-teach as it is all completely new concepts!)
    Hope this helps, and Good Luck!
    Lizzie
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Hi, Hope everyone is enjoying the festive period,

    Looking for some advice please,

    I'm a 23 year old guy, i left school at 16 and have been working as a carpenter ever since. Over the last couple of years I've taken a real interest in economics and would love to be able to study it at university. So I've recently decided to start self studying a-level maths, economics and government+politics. I'd ideally like to have 3 full a-levels in time to start uni in sept 2014. I've rented my flat out and moved back in with my parents so I can commit to this full time.

    I'd like to know if this is feasible given the amount of time between now and the exams in June 2014. Including the fact that there isn't going to be any exams in the January. My intentions are to do all 4 of the economics and politics as-level exams this June coming (2013), taken the remainder of the exams for all three subjects in one go in June 2014. Is this doable?

    Also could someone recommend which exam boards to use for these subjects? Considering that im self studying i will need to use the exam board that has the best textbooks, study guides, online material etc.

    Sorry for going on a bit but if anyone could help me with this I'd really appreciate it.
    for my maths subscribe to this website its got everything Livemaths

    also buy these DVDs for C3 and C4 he fully explains it

    do edexcel for maths

    you could also try to do an access course
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Thanks for the advice man, I've decided to self study as i thought i'd have to pay quite a lot of money to do it any other way, but if im entitled to funding then i might look into that. I'd think i'd stuggle being surrounded by 16-17 year olds at a college though. I do intend to have help from tutors here and there.
    I don't think you'll be surrounded by other 16-17 year olds, there are other mature students like you.
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    I'm sorry that this doesn't answer your question... but what Universitys were you thinking of applying to? I've applied for economic and if I get AAA, I'll be off to Leeds in 2013
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Hi, Hope everyone is enjoying the festive period,

    Looking for some advice please,

    I'm a 23 year old guy, i left school at 16 and have been working as a carpenter ever since. Over the last couple of years I've taken a real interest in economics and would love to be able to study it at university. So I've recently decided to start self studying a-level maths, economics and government+politics. I'd ideally like to have 3 full a-levels in time to start uni in sept 2014. I've rented my flat out and moved back in with my parents so I can commit to this full time.

    I'd like to know if this is feasible given the amount of time between now and the exams in June 2014. Including the fact that there isn't going to be any exams in the January. My intentions are to do all 4 of the economics and politics as-level exams this June coming (2013), taken the remainder of the exams for all three subjects in one go in June 2014. Is this doable?

    Also could someone recommend which exam boards to use for these subjects? Considering that im self studying i will need to use the exam board that has the best textbooks, study guides, online material etc.

    Sorry for going on a bit but if anyone could help me with this I'd really appreciate it.
    When I first read this, I thought I was imagining things. I am in a very similar situation in the fact that I too am a mature student and around the same age, albeit one year older. I am self studying AS Economics (OCR), Maths (Edexcel) and Government and Politics (Edexcel) with the goal of going to a top 25 university in 2014 to do BSc Economics. I think it is entirely feasible to complete all 3 subjects for AS and get good grades if you started now. However, I would say that A-levels are no walk in the park and a great work ethic is a must. Despite getting a grade B for GCSE maths, I am thoroughly enjoying the AS Maths course and actually like doing it! I would say go for it, but get started now! There's no time to waste. Remember, the first C1 Maths exam is in May along with C2 and S1/M1/D1, so you have less time than you may have originally anticipated. If you need any more advice, feel free to PM me.
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    (Original post by Depth of Field)
    When I first read this, I thought I was imagining things. I am in a very similar situation in the fact that I too am a mature student and around the same age, albeit one year older. I am self studying AS Economics (OCR), Maths (Edexcel) and Government and Politics (Edexcel) with the goal of going to a top 25 university in 2014 to do BSc Economics. I think it is entirely feasible to complete all 3 subjects for AS and get good grades if you started now. However, I would say that A-levels are no walk in the park and a great work ethic is a must. Despite getting a grade B for GCSE maths, I am thoroughly enjoying the AS Maths course and actually like doing it! I would say go for it, but get started now! There's no time to waste. Remember, the first C1 Maths exam is in May along with C2 and S1/M1/D1, so you have less time than you may have originally anticipated. If you need any more advice, feel free to PM me.
    Hey, thanks for the post, glad im not the only one! Did you find you had to go over quite a bit of gcse maths before you could start studying for the a-level? If so which parts? I too got a B in gcse maths but that was with minimum effort/work. I was happy with that at the time as i only needed Cs, in hindsight i wish i had put my head down.

    I think May might be a bit soon for me but im going to study hard then see where i am when the deadline comes around.
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    (Original post by woahpotter)
    I'm sorry that this doesn't answer your question... but what Universitys were you thinking of applying to? I've applied for economic and if I get AAA, I'll be off to Leeds in 2013
    Not really sure yet. I'll be aiming for top grades so hope to get into a respectable uni. I like the look of SOAS so far as i'd like to do an economics degree geared towards development. Although Leeds is a good shout as i could watch god's chosen football team on a regular basis. Leeds is great, im sure you'll have an awesome time.
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    (Original post by -Fraser-)
    Hey, thanks for the post, glad im not the only one! Did you find you had to go over quite a bit of gcse maths before you could start studying for the a-level? If so which parts? I too got a B in gcse maths but that was with minimum effort/work. I was happy with that at the time as i only needed Cs, in hindsight i wish i had put my head down.

    I think May might be a bit soon for me but im going to study hard then see where i am when the deadline comes around.
    My B in GCSE was also due to minimum effort/work. I was always in top set for Maths, but my lack of dedication and absenteeism made me under-achieve, which of course is totally a fault on my part.

    To be honest I forgot most of what I did in GCSE maths, but C1 goes over everything anyway - linear algebra, quadratics, co-ordinate geometry etc so there is no need to start going through the GCSE syllabus for preliminary knowledge. Now being mid-way through C2, C1 seems so much easier! It's all about practice, practice and more practice.

    Here's how I started Maths:

    1) Use http://www.themathsteacher.com to start off your C1 module. It's really good as the guy explains everything so well through video tutorials.
    2) Use http://www.examsolutions.net to reinforce your learning. This website is a godsend as it has video tutorials as well as video exam question solutions. Again, the guy on here is amazing and explaining thing.
    3) Use http://www.livemaths.co.uk for further explanations of concepts. You have to pay a yearly subscription though, but it's worth it!

    When using these websites try and learn the sections in the same order as the chapters in the Edexcel Maths book.

    In terms of universities, I am quite fond of the university of Surrey for Economics as it's Economics department is rated highly and the course features a year in industry placement which is very attractive to me.
 
 
 
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