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What on earth should I do after 2 resits?

I have been in 3 A-Level exam seasons. This would be my Year 15 (I'm 20)

Pandemic year: CDE

I have resit twice,
1st year Resit: DDD
2nd year Resit: DDE

I know that if i can improve my learning skills with a learning coach i can perform well academically.

Should i try a foundation year with that strategy or is it too late.
What do you feel is the reason you have received these results?
Original post by 1582
What do you feel is the reason you have received these results?


Just poor learning skills. Overwhelmed at the amount i needed to learn.
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
Just poor learning skills. Overwhelmed at the amount i needed to learn.


Hi! :smile:
Is there a specific subject you want to study?
I'm guessing the university you want to go to possibly has high grade requirements?
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by Chronoscope
Hi! :smile:
Is there a specific subject you want to study?
I'm guessing the university you want to go to possibly has high grade requirements?


Computer Science.
No the bare minimum, EEE grade req.
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
Computer Science.
No the bare minimum, EEE grade req.


I'm just wondering, have you considered alternative routes into university? For example, via BTEC's, access courses, apprenticeships :smile:
Another option could be a gap year, or work for a bit, travel and see what you'd like to do.
If you prefer exams over coursework you could consider a BTEC depending on the university you want to go to, however, that could possibly be another x2 years of education and another year of funding.
I think you should look at degree apprenticeships in IT or software engineering https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship

This would allow you to get a degree, get a chance to learn in the workplace as well as through a university and build up a decent cv
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 7
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
I have been in 3 A-Level exam seasons. This would be my Year 15 (I'm 20)

Pandemic year: CDE

I have resit twice,
1st year Resit: DDD
2nd year Resit: DDE

I know that if i can improve my learning skills with a learning coach i can perform well academically.

Should i try a foundation year with that strategy or is it too late.


have u applied to unis? what subjects did you get the grades?
hi, don’t feel so bad about it. have you always had the same subjects?
i’m self teaching and im 19, i will be 20 too next year sadly but honestly you will be ok!
if a-levels aren’t for you, maybe consider BTEC? i’m honestly re considering about my a-levels too as it’s so stressful especially when you see all the workload !!
what subjects do you do?
Reply 9
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
I have been in 3 A-Level exam seasons. This would be my Year 15 (I'm 20)

Pandemic year: CDE

I have resit twice,
1st year Resit: DDD
2nd year Resit: DDE

I know that if i can improve my learning skills with a learning coach i can perform well academically.

Should i try a foundation year with that strategy or is it too late.


Gl but bc I dont know you I don't know how to specificly help with your learning skills. What I would try to do:

- Timetables - I add in a few extra hours a week in case something comes up/ I dont cover the content in time. I find it less stressful when I write out each topic and its sub topics and then tackle it individually. Rember to account for the different topics in your timetable.

-Youtube videos really help - I found for physics at least there were several videos for the same topics. After watching both I realised each video covered a majority of the topics but both had some content the other missed out.

-exam prac - When I run out of past papers I find a few exam Questions and give myself a set amount of time depending on the marks.

If you struggle with sitting down and revision try and start small by doing half an hour of revision every other day and then ramping it up very slowly. I think it more important to stay committed then to do too much. Try and get your revision done early in the day.

If you are really tired with a levels you can go straight to doing a degree with the Open university. They are very well respected online and in person University who require no previous qualifications. You can do their degrees part time/full time (they both cost the same amount to do). However, a full time degree will cost you 6k a year and a part time 3k (it takes twice as long to complete). You can pause the degree at any point - I belive you have up to 15 years to complete it. Just remember it is quite a lot of money - I'm not sure if you have to pay for a level at the moment.
Reply 10
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
I have been in 3 A-Level exam seasons. This would be my Year 15 (I'm 20)

Pandemic year: CDE

I have resit twice,
1st year Resit: DDD
2nd year Resit: DDE

I know that if i can improve my learning skills with a learning coach i can perform well academically.

Should i try a foundation year with that strategy or is it too late.


maybe try for btec courses, or look into apprenticeships
If you're 20.
Stop wasting your youth.
Right now you're doing the same thing over and over again.
Relax.
Just start working and then in a couple of years go back to this academic business but right now you need a break
Reply 12
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
I have been in 3 A-Level exam seasons. This would be my Year 15 (I'm 20)

Pandemic year: CDE

I have resit twice,
1st year Resit: DDD
2nd year Resit: DDE

I know that if i can improve my learning skills with a learning coach i can perform well academically.

Should i try a foundation year with that strategy or is it too late.


You need to make a decision about what you want to do in life as you are clearly struggling and it doesn't seem like you've actually made any progress in the past 2 years. Believe me, it doesn't get any easier in university, infact it gets quite a bit harder. You should find out if you have an actual learning disability and find some resources to cope. If it's just a matter of not putting in the work though, well then there's nothing anyone here can help you with. One would expect at least some progress after a resit, let alone 2, only it looks like you're going in reverse, this should be your hint to stop. Hence, figure out if this is really for you or if you should stop wasting time and divert your efforts elsewhere into something more productive; my hunch is on the latter at this point. There's always time to retry later in life once you've got more grounding and conviction about the things you want.
(edited 8 months ago)
Original post by Inspiringvisons
If you're 20.
Stop wasting your youth.
Right now you're doing the same thing over and over again.
Relax.
Just start working and then in a couple of years go back to this academic business but right now you need a break


I never thought about this.

Do you mean go into a full time job just stacking shelves or a paid apprenticeship?
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
I never thought about this.

Do you mean go into a full time job just stacking shelves or a paid apprenticeship?

Whatever you can get - you can look at apprenticeship route roles, but also potentially just entry level roles in any area. This could be customer service/shelf stacking roles in some areas, but may also include entry level office based roles (e.g. admin/secretarial roles) if there are any available. Just look what you can get, get some work experience, then if desired look for other roles to parlay your work experience into a new, possible better role.

I agree with the above, at this point I think you are just knocking against a wall - I found taking some time out to work helped a lot in many ways, in developing my independence and personal admin/time management skills. When I returned to higher education I also had a much more focused approach to things and was less "going through the motions" with it. Of course in my case I did that after starting uni which caused other issues, so in your case you're at the best time to do that as you won't have any problems with SFE funding entitlement or anything taking the time to work now!

Remember just because you're doing a given job "for now" doesn't mean you're going to be doing it "forever". Even if you don't end up pursuing higher education, you absolutely can work your way up the ladder the "old fashioned way" by getting in on the ground floor and developing yourself and applying to more advanced roles based on your experience. You can also start in some admittedly probably not great role stacking shelves or doing customer service at a call centre or something (if you're interested in the IT field you may want to particularly look into tech support or helpdesk roles that are entry level to start building up some experience in a related area for example), and then as above, use that experience to apply to other roles after some time.

If you do want to pursue higher education then I think you'll probably find as I did, the experience will help you a lot with focusing on it and approaching it in a better way (more as a job than just "school"!). Plus of course there are apprenticeship options (including up to degree apprenticeships), which especially if your desired field is in the computing sector, are well worth exploring as they are quite possibly a better option than a CS degree in many situations in that sector due to the wealth of experience you gain working directly on projects :smile:
Original post by artful_lounger
Whatever you can get - you can look at apprenticeship route roles, but also potentially just entry level roles in any area. This could be customer service/shelf stacking roles in some areas, but may also include entry level office based roles (e.g. admin/secretarial roles) if there are any available. Just look what you can get, get some work experience, then if desired look for other roles to parlay your work experience into a new, possible better role.

I agree with the above, at this point I think you are just knocking against a wall - I found taking some time out to work helped a lot in many ways, in developing my independence and personal admin/time management skills. When I returned to higher education I also had a much more focused approach to things and was less "going through the motions" with it. Of course in my case I did that after starting uni which caused other issues, so in your case you're at the best time to do that as you won't have any problems with SFE funding entitlement or anything taking the time to work now!

Remember just because you're doing a given job "for now" doesn't mean you're going to be doing it "forever". Even if you don't end up pursuing higher education, you absolutely can work your way up the ladder the "old fashioned way" by getting in on the ground floor and developing yourself and applying to more advanced roles based on your experience. You can also start in some admittedly probably not great role stacking shelves or doing customer service at a call centre or something (if you're interested in the IT field you may want to particularly look into tech support or helpdesk roles that are entry level to start building up some experience in a related area for example), and then as above, use that experience to apply to other roles after some time.

If you do want to pursue higher education then I think you'll probably find as I did, the experience will help you a lot with focusing on it and approaching it in a better way (more as a job than just "school"!). Plus of course there are apprenticeship options (including up to degree apprenticeships), which especially if your desired field is in the computing sector, are well worth exploring as they are quite possibly a better option than a CS degree in many situations in that sector due to the wealth of experience you gain working directly on projects :smile:

Thank you for such a comprehensive answer.

Let's say I do the mature student route, will I still need to redo my A-Levels to get a respectable grades before applying to higher education?
Reply 16
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
Thank you for such a comprehensive answer.

Let's say I do the mature student route, will I still need to redo my A-Levels to get a respectable grades before applying to higher education?

Mature students are still required to show themselves capable of succeeding academically in preparation for the degree course. This can be through recent A levels, an Access to HE course, or otherwise. The more relevant the better, but you would need to do something.
Original post by McDonaldsEmploy
Thank you for such a comprehensive answer.

Let's say I do the mature student route, will I still need to redo my A-Levels to get a respectable grades before applying to higher education?

As above, you're usually expected to demonstrate some recent academic achievement within the 3 years prior to applying to the degree (ideally closer to the start than further!). But unis recognise mature students often come from quite varied backgrounds and experiences so most if not all have policies that they will focus on your most recent academic attainment and not focus too much on the past attainment in e.g. A-levels, unless you just did A-levels, then had a year out then resat them or did a new qualification (in which case they might look at them a bit more).

They also usually anticipate mature students won't necessarily be taking A-levels so will often (but not always!) accept things like Access to HE courses, OU modules taken recently, etc as evidence of recent study. That said if you're applying to a course with specific subject requirements (e.g. a course that requires A-level Maths) they will expect you to have done that or an equivalent course (specifically in terms of A-level Maths, I note that a lot of STEM focused Access to HE courses do not contain sufficient maths for direct entry to such courses). However there are also foundation year options if your Access course or what have you doesn't meet the standard requirements (and foundation years are I believe quite used to assessing students from very varied educational backgrounds and can be more flexible sometimes in requirements).

So A-levels aren't your only option although depending on the course, they may be necessary (either alone or an A-level in combination with an Access to HE course or similar, although that would be a very intensive option). Worth noting also from a finance perspective for doing A-levels after the age of 19, you would normally need to pay tuition fees or be self studying and paying exam fees, and if you take any science A-levels universities would expect you to do the science endorsement which can be very expensive. So if your aim is a science course you may want to consider an Access course -> degree/foundation year (if the Access course does not meet the standard requirements) route. On the plus side you can usually get an Advanced Learner Loan (ALL) for an Access course (you may be able to get it for A-levels but providers never seem to be sure in my experience), and uniquely for those who complete an Access to course funded by an ALL, then go on to complete a degree, the ALL gets written off :smile:

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