Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

MPhil in Engineering in Cambridge vs MSc in Aeronautics at Imperial, both funded. Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone!!

    I recently graduated from Warwick with a BEng in Mechanical Engineering. I have 2 conditional offers (both satisfied) form both Cambridge (MPhil in Engineering) and Imperial College (MSc in Advanced Computational Methods for Aeronautics). In the first case I will, most likely, be working on an experimental project sponsored by Rolls Royce, whereas the second will be a taught course whit the fees paid fully by a RAeS scholarship. I have not decided whereas I will be continuing my education by pursuing a PhD after this year. As a result, although I am a bit more oriented towards Cambridge, I am worried by any possible issue regarding the CEng accreditation and work opportunities in industry with a Master by Research.
    What would you suggest? I am so confused and would like to hear any relevant experience since the deadline for accepting the offer is approaching
    Regards

    Andrea
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    For aeronautics, Imperial rules but you can't go wrong with either. Both are great masters.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by c0sk)
    Hi everyone!!

    I recently graduated from Warwick with a BEng in Mechanical Engineering. I have 2 conditional offers (both satisfied) form both Cambridge (MPhil in Engineering) and Imperial College (MSc in Advanced Computational Methods for Aeronautics). In the first case I will, most likely, be working on an experimental project sponsored by Rolls Royce, whereas the second will be a taught course whit the fees paid fully by a RAeS scholarship. I have not decided whereas I will be continuing my education by pursuing a PhD after this year. As a result, although I am a bit more oriented towards Cambridge, I am worried by any possible issue regarding the CEng accreditation and work opportunities in industry with a Master by Research.
    What would you suggest? I am so confused and would like to hear any relevant experience since the deadline for accepting the offer is approaching
    Regards

    Andrea
    There are positives in both. The Cambridge one sounds promising if you're getting to work on a project sponsored by Rolls Royce, but does that mean you still have to pay the fees? The RAeS scholarship also sounds excellent, and will look good on your CV, but does it offer any direct avenue into a company, like the Cambridge one could?

    What is the accreditation status of the degrees? And with such degrees, would be even be interested in the types of positions that will automatically reject you for not having a fully accredited masters degree (assuming one or either of them aren't accredited)?

    When it comes to research or very advanced positions, companies are used to dealing with applicants from non-traditional (i.e. non-MEng) backgrounds because it's probably the norm. Lots of the type of masters degrees typically taken by applicants to such positions aren't accredited because they don't cover the full breadth of engineering skills required for such accreditation, but it doesn't matter if they're only focusing on one or two specific skills (e.g. advanced computational methods). In fact, often people with physics and applied maths degrees are hired for these roles too.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    There are positives in both. The Cambridge one sounds promising if you're getting to work on a project sponsored by Rolls Royce, but does that mean you still have to pay the fees? The RAeS scholarship also sounds excellent, and will look good on your CV, but does it offer any direct avenue into a company, like the Cambridge one could?

    What is the accreditation status of the degrees? And with such degrees, would be even be interested in the types of positions that will automatically reject you for not having a fully accredited masters degree (assuming one or either of them aren't accredited)?

    When it comes to research or very advanced positions, companies are used to dealing with applicants from non-traditional (i.e. non-MEng) backgrounds because it's probably the norm. Lots of the type of masters degrees typically taken by applicants to such positions aren't accredited because they don't cover the full breadth of engineering skills required for such accreditation, but it doesn't matter if they're only focusing on one or two specific skills (e.g. advanced computational methods). In fact, often people with physics and applied maths degrees are hired for these roles too.
    Thanks to both for your replies!

    The Imperial MSc is accredited. The one in Cambridge isn't. In the latter, I still would have to pay fees. However, the sponsorship would cover fees, accommodation costs and a tiny bit of living expenses. The RAeS scholarship, on the other hand, is sponsored by several aerospace companies and I can join several online portals to link me with such companies. However, this connection would not be as strong as with RR if I end up in Cambridge.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by c0sk)
    Thanks to both for your replies!

    The Imperial MSc is accredited. The one in Cambridge isn't. In the latter, I still would have to pay fees. However, the sponsorship would cover fees, accommodation costs and a tiny bit of living expenses. The RAeS scholarship, on the other hand, is sponsored by several aerospace companies and I can join several online portals to link me with such companies. However, this connection would not be as strong as with RR if I end up in Cambridge.
    To be honest that is an exceptionally difficult choice... The only thing I can advise is that you should really consider where you want to live for a year. I've never been to Cambridge but I'd imagine it's completely different to London as a living experience.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    One important questions: Which fields attracts you more? Where do you want to end up. With Cambridge you look at the research/thermofluiddynamics direction, with Imperial more in the general direction. At the end, you have to really like your area to maximise your chances to succeed and in addition as we see now, the aeronautics industry is currently not the most promising employer in the near future. (In one year the situation may get better, but not necessarily.)

    The Chartered status is also only relevant if you want to stay in the UK. Outside the UK a research orientated Master will be often more suitable. So if working for e.g. Alstom in the Switzerland is also an option, the argument looses weight.

    I would go, which place suits more your heart and your favorite kind of entry position (research or maybe not really?). Both degrees won't narrow your future options in or outside aeronautics, but they set the direction.

    Concerning the aforementioned difference of living experience: It will definitely be different.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    One important questions: Which fields attracts you more? Where do you want to end up. With Cambridge you look at the research/thermofluiddynamics direction, with Imperial more in the general direction. At the end, you have to really like your area to maximise your chances to succeed and in addition as we see now, the aeronautics industry is currently not the most promising employer in the near future. (In one year the situation may get better, but not necessarily.)

    The Chartered status is also only relevant if you want to stay in the UK. Outside the UK a research orientated Master will be often more suitable. So if working for e.g. Alstom in the Switzerland is also an option, the argument looses weight.

    I would go, which place suits more your heart and your favorite kind of entry position (research or maybe not really?). Both degrees won't narrow your future options in or outside aeronautics, but they set the direction.

    Concerning the aforementioned difference of living experience: It will definitely be different.
    I think both of the are relatively focused and interesting. Both the computational and the experimental (Cam) approach appeal a lot to me. To be fair I really wanted to do an aerospace undergrad as well but opted for a more generic one with the intention of specialising in the field later on. I also agree with both of you regarding the living experience. I had the pleasure to live in London for a bit and it was a phenomenal experience. However, since it is merely one year, this aspect is secondary.

    Finally, I would like a research entry position, and, honestly, in the end, I might end up pursuing a PhD and remain in academia.

    Thank everyone for your help. One more question, do you reckon the challenges and difficulties of the courses would be comparable?


    Andrea
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by c0sk)
    One more question, do you reckon the challenges and difficulties of the courses would be comparable?
    I have no idea, just that concerning the research one it really depends on the supervisor, your experience and the topic, how difficult it will be for you. A taught Master will be like undergraduate, everyone has the same exams.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 12, 2014
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.