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    I use adaptive software. I always have a dictionary open on my PC, I use inspiration, Via Voice and Text help read and write.

    It has taken me a long time to get this far with my English.

    I did get what you mean about constructing sentances etc. I was just ........... well I'm in a bit of an odd mood.

    When I was at school the school policy was that dyslexia didn't exist. I picked 'O' Levels - no GCSEs then that involved the least writing wherever I could so I did sciences. I had an English teacher who's method of teaching was to give you a spelling test and then kick you once for every word you spelled wrong.


    It wasn't until I went to uni in my 30s I found out I was actually good at essays.

    OK appologies to everyone for me going off topic.
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    *Rushes in to stick up for RS.*

    Once again, another wrong assumption. The RS syllabus that I do is ridiculously hard, and because of this I have found it very intellectually stimulating, and am thinking in ways I never would have done before. This is because it goes into considerable depth, covering things like theology, philosophy and ethics.
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    (Original post by Leaby)
    *Rushes in to stick up for RS.*

    Once again, another wrong assumption. The RS syllabus that I do is ridiculously hard, and because of this I have found it very intellectually stimulating, and am thinking in ways I never would have done before. This is because it goes into considerable depth, covering things like theology, philosophy and ethics.
    RE is damned hard.
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    I think that RE and Philosophy are definitely less mickey-mouse than plain A Level maths (which is, as someone's already said, just applying formulae) as they require you to synthesise knowledge far more throughly than you need to in a maths exam where there are a limited number of questions which you can basically learn how to do. Maths is regarded at school level as being far harder than it actually is (not bad for me, as I'm doing it, but it definitely puts others at a disadvantage because comparatively everything else appears... lesser).
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    i find it quite ironic that A-levels are meant to broaden our minds, and generally by this stage we should all, as adults or near-adults, be quite open-minded and considerate of other people/attitudes/situations. lets face it, hundreds of years ago subjects such as computing wouldn't have been taught? obviously because the damn things hadn't been invented yet. what we learn has to change with the times, eventually these MM subjects will become a necessity. nobody bothers teaching us latin or greek as a compulsory anymore do they?and why? because it isn't necessary.

    also, A-levels are meant to be about choice, if you like maths, you like maths. if you like sociology, you like sociology. its all about preference- a sociologist isn't qualified to comment on how 'crap' or 'boring' or 'useless' maths is, whereas a mathematician isn't qualified to say the same about a sociologist. unless of course they are the same person

    oh and another thing...

    whoever said Art and Drama/Theatre Studies were mickey-mouse must be shot immediately
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    How on earth is Critical Thinking a mickey-mouse subject?
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    (Original post by courtyboy02)
    How on earth is Critical Thinking a mickey-mouse subject?
    In relation to another subject like Further Maths?
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    How is everyone defining a mickey mouse subject?
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    (Original post by LS.)
    How is everyone defining a mickey mouse subject?
    There are various definitions.
    Things that aren't "hard", that aren't "respected", that aren't "traditional".
    So, maths, physics, history etc are all safe.
    Sociology, general studies, psychology are not.
    People that use the term are almost always doing maths/further maths/physics/chemistry etc.
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    i think this whole 'mickey-mouse' subject thing is of no relevance.....the only idea of people doing this is to try and make people doing these subjects feel as though they are less worthy of a uni place. People can choose whatever subject they like without it being classed as a dossy subject, even if less work is required. Often, these so-called mickey mouse subjects are just what people want because they are directly related to the uni course they want to do. Therefore i think that people should stop calling certain subjects mickey mouse!
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    (Original post by jamierwilliams)
    i think this who 'mickey-mouse' subject things is of no relevance.....the only idea of people doing this is to try and make people doing these subjects feel as though they are getting off easy. People can choose whatever subject they like without it being classed as a dossy subject, even if less work is required. Often, these so-called mickey mouse subjects are just what people want because they are directly related to the uni course they want to do. Therefore i think that people should stop calling certain subjects mickey mouse!
    Obviously. Using the term mickey mouse is, in my opinion, revolting snobbery by people who have no idea just how hard some subjects can be.
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    (Original post by suspicious_fish)
    Obviously. Using the term mickey mouse is, in my opinion, revolting snobbery by people who have no idea just how hard some subjects can be.
    precisely
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    (Original post by suspicious_fish)
    There are various definitions.
    Things that aren't "hard", that aren't "respected", that aren't "traditional".
    So, maths, physics, history etc are all safe.
    Sociology, general studies, psychology are not.
    People that use the term are almost always doing maths/further maths/physics/chemistry etc.
    I guess I'm lucky that I'm doing physics and chemistry and not seeing subjects in terms of being 'Mickey Mouse'

    As for being hard...it's all subjective. I don't find biology that hard, but it doesn't mean everyone else does. I guess it's all down to the individual.

    However, I do think that general studies is kinda a MM subject; simply because most universities dont except it (or accept it at a fraction of the point score) and that there is hardly any 'teaching' involved (well, atour 6th form)
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    I still call I'C'T mickey mouse in spite of agreeing with the fact difficulty is subjective. Do computing and I'C'T knowledge comes through experience and common sense. I'C't is for those that can't quite hack computing IMO.
    Sorry for being ignorant, but what is the difference between Computing and ICT? :confused:
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    I still call I'C'T mickey mouse in spite of agreeing with the fact difficulty is subjective. Do computing and I'C'T knowledge comes through experience and common sense. I'C't is for those that can't quite hack computing IMO.
    OI YOU! :rolleyes:
    I'll have you know I did ICT A-Level after doing it at GCSE and getting the first A* my school had ever had, a record which I dont think has been equalled since (Gloat over )
    I do fundamentally agree that it is 'micky mouse' but only for people who understand computers, for A-Level i did no revision for the theory and got 90/90 on 3 out of 4 papers, I also did all my years coursework in a weekend however for someone who does'nt know what they are doing it is most certainly not a micky mouse subject.
    Anyway my only point to you is that I could have easily hacked ocmputing but thought ICT would be more appreciable on my UCAS application.
    SO THERE
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    (Original post by LS.)
    Sorry for being ignorant, but what is the difference between Computing and ICT? :confused:
    ICT has a minimal amount of actual Computers, it more the social implications of computers and other technology and also using computers to make databases, spreadsheets etc. rather than the really technical side of computing. Basically, it's Computing without much computing.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    ICT has a minimal amount of actual Computers, it more the social implications of computers and other technology and also using computers to make databases, spreadsheets etc. rather than the really technical side of computing. Basically, it's Computing without much computing.
    240/600 marks are for coursework which encompases all the course's computing, that is to say, not much computing at all, its mostly all report writing.
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    The stuff computing students just take for granted.
    And me :rolleyes:! Even though i was an ICT student.

    Congrats on your driving test btw, if it applies to you.
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    Thanks for the info Lord Huntroyde and piginapoke

    I did ICT for GCSE, I got an A, but I'm not brilliant with computers like some people on the course (who got low grades despite being good with computers... might have been because they spent the lessons looking at porn and not doing coursework...but who knows? )
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    The stuff computing students just take for granted.
    Would it be acceptable, then, to take ICT if you're not proficient in things like that?
 
 
 

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