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    Would you want an applied psychology degree or a psychology degree for a psychology phd?
    I want to study pyschology at Durham university but I don't know whether I should do applied or not. I will most likely go on to a phd in psychology as I want to be a Consultant Psychiatrist.
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    how different are the modules between normal and applied?
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    Straight psychology would be better for a PhD. Also, you would need to take a medical degree not a PhD to become a psychiatrist of any level.
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    (Original post by pysch)
    Would you want an applied psychology degree or a psychology degree for a psychology phd?
    I want to study pyschology at Durham university but I don't know whether I should do applied or not. I will most likely go on to a phd in psychology as I want to be a Consultant Psychiatrist.
    I think the main difference for applied degrees is in the options that you can do at third year. At durham however, i think the applied degree is taught by a completely different department in the stockton campus (rather than in dirham).

    If you want to do a PhD, its probably not best to do an "applied" degree, since this is only better for people who want to do things like counselling or clinical work.

    Also worth mentioning that to become a psychiatrist you need a medicine degree. ALso, a PhD isn't used to become a practising psychologist, you need a doctorate in clinical psychology (im not sure what that entails, but its not a phd) http://careers.bps.org.uk/area/clinical
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    Applied is respected for medicine (I think: maybe moreso than normal psych), if it is psychiatry you want to do. lol
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    I think the main difference for applied degrees is in the options that you can do at third year. At durham however, i think the applied degree is taught by a completely different department in the stockton campus (rather than in dirham).

    If you want to do a PhD, its probably not best to do an "applied" degree, since this is only better for people who want to do things like counselling or clinical work.

    Also worth mentioning that to become a psychiatrist you need a medicine degree. ALso, a PhD isn't used to become a practising psychologist, you need a doctorate in clinical psychology (im not sure what that entails, but its not a phd) http://careers.bps.org.uk/area/clinical
    ahhh that makes a lot more sense! I've decided I don't want to do a medical degree so I'll probably choose to be a clinical psychologist (which is what i originally wanted to do). Thanks for your help!!
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    The title of the degree doesn't matter that much. It's far more about the marks you get on your degree and the experience you can gather before your postgraduate application to a clinical training course. Generally, as long as your degree confers recognition by the British Psychological Society, and your marks are good, no one really cares.
 
 
 
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