Beefman10
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So this is my situation:
  • I achieved 9 GCSE's.
  • very enthusiastic about Computers
  • Built my first computer when i was 13 Years old
  • Started developing websites using HTML/CSS and javascript when i was 13/14
  • When i was 15 i started learning pascal programming language
  • Achieved a grade C in Mathematics at GCSE
  • 16 years old I started learning Java
  • 17 years old i started developing android mobile applications and currently have a part time job working for a mobile application company.
  • I also have experience with php forms and sql/mysql databases.
At the moment i'm studying Enterprise AS Level, Game Development BTEC and information and communication technology BTEC.

I would really want to study Computer Science at University but i'm afraid it would be too Mathematics based.

Would i benefit from taking a gap year and restudying Math's GCSE and getting an A? (When i put my mind to something i'm very focus and i believe an A wouldn't be too hard if i studied hard). or go straight to university and study computer science? After all, they'd teach me all the mathematics within the course. I'm currently looking at university which teach computer forensics within the computer science course.
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StaticVoid
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Do A-level maths, but be dedicated to it, if you find CS fun then building a foundation of maths allows you to go further into more fun aspects.
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VannR
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You need to understand A-Level Mathematics in order to study computer science at university - no way around it. The mathematics on a (good - at least top-50) computer science course will have mathematics that will tear you to shreds unless you have A-Level knowledge - GCSE mathematics knowledge is mostly irrelevant for this subject.

That gap year should be spent doing A-Level Mathematics, otherwise you frankly have very little hope of doing well on a computer science course. You have an impressive programming background, but computer science has actually very little to do with programming - it is applied mathematical logic.
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Audiology-Med
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(Original post by Beefman10)
So this is my situation:
  • I achieved 9 GCSE's C/B Grade.
  • very enthusiastic about Computers
  • Built my first computer when i was 12/13 Years old
  • Started developing websites using HTML/CSS and javascript when i was 13/14
  • When i was 15 i started learning pascal programming language
  • Achieved a grade C in Mathematics at GCSE
  • 16 years old I started learning Java
  • 17 years old i started developing android mobile applications and currently have a part time job working for a mobile application company.
  • I also have experience with php forms and sql/mysql databases.
At the moment i'm studying Enterprise AS Level, Game Development BTEC and information and communication technology BTEC. If i achieve my target grades i will have a total of around 450 UCAS points. My target grade for Enterprise is grade C (I'm not really too bothered about it since my sixth form are forcing me to take it) DDD for game Development diploma and DDM for ICT diploma.

I would really want to study Computer Science at University but i'm afraid it would be too Math's based.

Would i benefit from taking a gap year and restudying Math's GCSE and getting an A? (When i put my mind to something i'm very focus and i believe an A wouldn't be too hard if i studied hard). or go straight to university and study computer science? After all they would teach me all the mathematics within the course. I would study extremely hard since computers is my life. I'm currently looking at university which teach computer forensics within the computer science course.
I was in a similar situation to you , apart from the fact you know more about programming than me as I'm just learning it now. I only have done GCSE Maths which I got a B, So I decided to apply through UCAS extra for Computer Science with a foundation year as I never did A level Maths or Computing. I think this will be good for me to brush up my maths skills before starting the actual course and on the foundation year we will mostly be learning the maths relevant to the CS degree, unlike GCSE which is more general

Theres no point redoing your GCSE Maths, I would say either go straight into a Computer Science course or apply to Computer Science with a foundation Year if your worried about your Maths ability.
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Beefman10
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(Original post by StaticVoid)
Do A-level maths, but be dedicated to it, if you find CS fun then building a foundation of maths allows you to go further into more fun aspects.
(Original post by VannR)
You need to understand A-Level Mathematics in order to study computer science at university - no way around it. The mathematics on a (good - at least top-50) computer science course will have mathematics that will tear you to shreds unless you have A-Level knowledge - GCSE mathematics knowledge is mostly irrelevant for this subject.

That gap year should be spent doing A-Level Mathematics, otherwise you frankly have very little hope of doing well on a computer science course. You have an impressive programming background, but computer science has actually very little to do with programming - it is applied mathematical logic.
so i shouldn't worry about the C Maths GCSE grade to much? The sixth form i'm studying at, at the moment teaches A Level Maths but i'd rather learn independently as i find i'm an individual learner. Is it possible to study A-Level Maths in my gap year at home and then find a exam hall which i can take the exam at? Similar to open universitys but for A Level.
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Beefman10
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(Original post by Audiology-Med)
I was in a similar situation to you , apart from the fact you know more about programming than me as I'm just learning it now. I only have done GCSE Maths which I got a B, So I decided to apply through UCAS extra for Computer Science with a foundation year as I never did A level Maths or Computing. I think this will be good for me to brush up my maths skills before starting the actual course and on the foundation year we will mostly be learning the maths relevant to the CS degree, unlike GCSE which is more general

Theres no point redoing your GCSE Maths, I would say either go straight into a Computer Science course or apply to Computer Science with a foundation Year if your worried about your Maths ability.
Thanks Audiology-Med,
Are you currently studying the foundation year now? How hard is the Mathematics?
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Audiology-Med
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(Original post by Beefman10)
Thanks Audiology-Med,
Are you currently studying the foundation year now? How hard is the Mathematics?
I'm currently at A level yet but I'm starting the foundation year this September, However I have talked to people who are currently doing it at Keele and they have said thats its pretty decent as long as you keep on top of the work load and that the tutors give you a lot of support, The maths book they use at keele foundation year is this;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Foundation-M...undation+maths

I Personally would recommend this route than redoing your Maths GCSE or even picking up Maths A level as your BTEC grades are good already and the foundation year is all you need to brush up on your maths and get used to life at university before starting your actual course
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8472
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Someone in my computing class at college is doing a level maths alongside computer science at uni. Can't for the life of me remember where they are going. That may be an option or do a foundation year.

Other than that, it'll be a blast.
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7894rmnxj
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(Original post by Beefman10)
So this is my situation:
  • I achieved 9 GCSE's.
  • very enthusiastic about Computers
  • Built my first computer when i was 13 Years old
  • Started developing websites using HTML/CSS and javascript when i was 13/14
  • When i was 15 i started learning pascal programming language
  • Achieved a grade C in Mathematics at GCSE
  • 16 years old I started learning Java
  • 17 years old i started developing android mobile applications and currently have a part time job working for a mobile application company.
  • I also have experience with php forms and sql/mysql databases.
At the moment i'm studying Enterprise AS Level, Game Development BTEC and information and communication technology BTEC.

I would really want to study Computer Science at University but i'm afraid it would be too Mathematics based.

Would i benefit from taking a gap year and restudying Math's GCSE and getting an A? (When i put my mind to something i'm very focus and i believe an A wouldn't be too hard if i studied hard). or go straight to university and study computer science? After all, they'd teach me all the mathematics within the course. I'm currently looking at university which teach computer forensics within the computer science course.
Hi
I am current a CS student at Newcastle uni, during my first year we did a maths module, and I think you will be perfectly fine with a C at GCSE. Yes you will find stuff hard (mainly differentiation) but as long as you put in the effort you will be ok. You will be well taught and there is always loads of help from the uni and tutorials online, I know my uni also offers a thing called maths aid to help people struggling with maths. So as long as the uni is happy with the C you will be fine
hope this helps
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username738914
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Beefman10)
So this is my situation:
  • I achieved 9 GCSE's.
  • very enthusiastic about Computers
  • Built my first computer when i was 13 Years old
  • Started developing websites using HTML/CSS and javascript when i was 13/14
  • When i was 15 i started learning pascal programming language
  • Achieved a grade C in Mathematics at GCSE
  • 16 years old I started learning Java
  • 17 years old i started developing android mobile applications and currently have a part time job working for a mobile application company.
  • I also have experience with php forms and sql/mysql databases.
At the moment i'm studying Enterprise AS Level, Game Development BTEC and information and communication technology BTEC.

I would really want to study Computer Science at University but i'm afraid it would be too Mathematics based.

Would i benefit from taking a gap year and restudying Math's GCSE and getting an A? (When i put my mind to something i'm very focus and i believe an A wouldn't be too hard if i studied hard). or go straight to university and study computer science? After all, they'd teach me all the mathematics within the course. I'm currently looking at university which teach computer forensics within the computer science course.
From the description you've given us, I'd recommend looking into Software Engineering courses. They are much more practical, based more on the application of computer science via programming rather than some of the more abstract concepts you'd find in a straight Comp Sci course.

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Async
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(Original post by VannR)
You need to understand A-Level Mathematics in order to study computer science at university - no way around it. The mathematics on a (good - at least top-50) computer science course will have mathematics that will tear you to shreds unless you have A-Level knowledge - GCSE mathematics knowledge is mostly irrelevant for this subject.

That gap year should be spent doing A-Level Mathematics, otherwise you frankly have very little hope of doing well on a computer science course. You have an impressive programming background, but computer science has actually very little to do with programming - it is applied mathematical logic.
I can't believe what I've just read. Do you or have you even studied a computer science course or have any relevant computing experience?
You talk as if you're regurgitation what you heard somebody else say. I find your post very deterministic and somewhat incorrect. Also you ignore the other alternative options, for example Software Engineering.
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Async
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Beefman10 You should take a look at Software Engineering course. It would suit you a lot better than CS.

The user above is very much correct. SE all the way. Join the club... I'm also one of those that enjoy programming a lot more than the other more mathematical aspects but not so great at maths. There's many people out there like me and you out there, don't feel alone...

Also, don't fall into the common misconception that you have to be good at maths to study a CompSci/programming related degree. Don't fall into that trap and take action upon your life based on what people say. I did that and it's probably the worst decision out there. So yeah, make your own decisions, there's many other pathways like software engineering which is basically like computer Science but much more practical and less theoretical.
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Binary Freak
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(Original post by Beefman10)
So this is my situation:
  • I achieved 9 GCSE's.
  • very enthusiastic about Computers
  • Built my first computer when i was 13 Years old
  • Started developing websites using HTML/CSS and javascript when i was 13/14
  • When i was 15 i started learning pascal programming language
  • Achieved a grade C in Mathematics at GCSE
  • 16 years old I started learning Java
  • 17 years old i started developing android mobile applications and currently have a part time job working for a mobile application company.
  • I also have experience with php forms and sql/mysql databases.
At the moment i'm studying Enterprise AS Level, Game Development BTEC and information and communication technology BTEC.

I would really want to study Computer Science at University but i'm afraid it would be too Mathematics based.

Would i benefit from taking a gap year and restudying Math's GCSE and getting an A? (When i put my mind to something i'm very focus and i believe an A wouldn't be too hard if i studied hard). or go straight to university and study computer science? After all, they'd teach me all the mathematics within the course. I'm currently looking at university which teach computer forensics within the computer science course.
For the mathematics content it depends where you want to study. Most universities have the same/similar mathematical content as AS/A2 Further Mathematics. I'd never recommend doing GCSE Mathematics again. It's absolutely pointless. If you're a first year just see if you can be a private candidate for AS/A2 Mathematics. It'd only better prepare you. Hell, even skipping AS/A2 Mathematics and going straight from GCSE to UG is feasible enough (Provided they accept you)

As for what most people said. You might want to look into software engineering.
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VannR
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(Original post by Async)
I can't believe what I've just read. Do you or have you even studied a computer science course or have any relevant computing experience?
You talk as if you're regurgitation what you heard somebody else say. I find your post very deterministic and somewhat incorrect. Also you ignore the other alternative options, for example Software Engineering.
Yes I do have relevant experience. I have good knowledge of Java, implemented 3d graphics programs from first principles (no libraries), and learnt how to use HTML and CSS.

However, this is irrelevant to my point. A simple web search will show that a computer science course will at least require some linear algebra (some courses go straight into FP A-level content). At GCSE-level linear algebra is simultaneous equations, not to mention the calculus required at many places.

Software engineering is not computer science.
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VannR
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(Original post by Beefman10)
so i shouldn't worry about the C Maths GCSE grade to much? The sixth form i'm studying at, at the moment teaches A Level Maths but i'd rather learn independently as i find i'm an individual learner. Is it possible to study A-Level Maths in my gap year at home and then find a exam hall which i can take the exam at? Similar to open universitys but for A Level.
You can study the subject privately and simply pay to sit them next year at a private centre (this what I did throughout my education). It is most definitely possuble for you to do provided that you are motivated and have £600 (the approximate cost) to pay for them next February.

Sorry for coming across as a doomsayer. It's just that GCSE-level mathematics is not enough for computer science. A-level is not that hard, but many of the concepts you learn will be vital.

I am under the impression that you want do more than just software engineering - you really want to know what lies at the heart of it all. Computer science is what will get you there, so just ignore those telling you to just keep programming without stopping to think about why it is even possible (software engineering).
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FinalMH
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(Original post by VannR)
You need to understand A-Level Mathematics in order to study computer science at university - no way around it. The mathematics on a (good - at least top-50) computer science course will have mathematics that will tear you to shreds unless you have A-Level knowledge - GCSE mathematics knowledge is mostly irrelevant for this subject.

That gap year should be spent doing A-Level Mathematics, otherwise you frankly have very little hope of doing well on a computer science course. You have an impressive programming background, but computer science has actually very little to do with programming - it is applied mathematical logic.
OP, please ignore this bit (in bold).
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Patrick2810
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(Original post by VannR)
You can study the subject privately and simply pay to sit them next year at a private centre (this what I did throughout my education). It is most definitely possuble for you to do provided that you are motivated and have £600 (the approximate cost) to pay for them next February.
Pretty sure most places charge ~£40 per module, and there are 6 modules in total for an A level in maths...

(£240)
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naxiv
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(Original post by StaticVoid)
Do A-level maths, but be dedicated to it, if you find CS fun then building a foundation of maths allows you to go further into more fun aspects.
(Original post by Binary Freak)
For the mathematics content it depends where you want to study. Most universities have the same/similar mathematical content as AS/A2 Further Mathematics. I'd never recommend doing GCSE Mathematics again. It's absolutely pointless. If you're a first year just see if you can be a private candidate for AS/A2 Mathematics. It'd only better prepare you. Hell, even skipping AS/A2 Mathematics and going straight from GCSE to UG is feasible enough (Provided they accept you)

As for what most people said. You might want to look into software engineering.
Man said hes got 9 gcses. Surely thats enough?
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ParadoxSocks
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I studied computing and AI at Nottingham without A Level maths and I survived. They teach you what you need as you go along anyway so as long as you're willing to work at it you'll be fine.

The only issue not having it may cause is from the unis requiring it for an offer. If you know where you're applying and you know they don't need it then you should be fine.

Look at the individual courses and see if it's what you want. Each uni will have a different course. I experienced Staffs Uni's vocational course (I studied war strategies in games, AI engines, advanced AI and other fun things like that) and Nottingham's more mathy academics. I enjoyed the stuff at Staffs more. The stuff at Nottingham was fun but I had less chance to apply it to anything.

It's going to completely depend on your interests.
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StaticVoid
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(Original post by naxiv)
Man said hes got 9 gcses. Surely thats enough?
http://archive.gamedev.net/archive/r...beatdetection/

This article for a starting beat detection requires knowledge of sigma summation, linear regression and integration, not very in depth knowledge though the importance of Alevel maths knowledge over GCSE is clear.
If he can learn it whilst that's fine, though either way it's pretty fundamental.
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