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    Hi,

    I'm having a bit of a dilemma as I come from Northern Ireland and I'm having to pick a University in England to possibly study Computer Science at which I have no idea about. I was wondering what Uni would be best for A level Grades CCC (240 UCAS points) + 110 UCAS points from Music Exams = 350 UCAS Points.

    I'm currently studying:
    ICT
    Business Studies
    Music

    GCSE:
    Maths - C
    ICT - A

    I am more of a practical person than a theoretical person so would prefer a more hands on type of CompSci degree course.

    If you need anymore info to make a suggestion, just ask, thanks.
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    As far as I'm aware UCAS points from Music qualifications don't count towards your application unless you're applying to study Music or it's a post grade 8 Qualification.

    You could maybe try Lincoln, Goldsmiths, Hull, depends what city you want to go to
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    You definitely need to hunt out a 100% vocational degree in say IT. ICT is barely related to Computer Science other than that they both involve a computer, and a grade C at GCSE maths and no maths a-level means you pretty much have no real chance of getting onto most compsci passes or passing them.

    Just making this 100% clear, sorry.
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    (Original post by CloakedSpartan)
    You definitely need to hunt out a 100% vocational degree in say IT. ICT is barely related to Computer Science other than that they both involve a computer, and a grade C at GCSE maths and no maths a-level means you pretty much have no real chance of getting onto most compsci passes or passing them.

    Just making this 100% clear, sorry.
    I code sometimes in my spare time and I know I'm capable of doing it. As Coding isn't everything I think I'm quite a good logical thinker even though I only achieved a C at GCSE Maths. Do you think I'd be better doing a foundation degree and then try getting in that way?
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    (Original post by Ross M)
    I code sometimes in my spare time and I know I'm capable of doing it. As Coding isn't everything I think I'm quite a good logical thinker even though I only achieved a C at GCSE Maths. Do you think I'd be better doing a foundation degree and then try getting in that way?
    I would advise either doing an A Level in Maths or applying to a Uni with a foundation degree because that way you would be able to get into a better University for CompSci. As far as I'm aware there is a high demand for Programmers, and there are lots of Universities which don't require Maths so if you don't want to do the Maths you would still be able to study CompSci, pass the course and get a job.

    However Universities that require Maths will have better and harder degrees, and their grads will go onto better jobs. If a University doesn't say that you need a Maths A Level to get onto the course then it won't matter, they aren't going to accept people onto the course if they are just going to fail.
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    (Original post by JW22)
    I would advise either doing an A Level in Maths or applying to a Uni with a foundation degree because that way you would be able to get into a better University for CompSci. As far as I'm aware there is a high demand for Programmers, and there are lots of Universities which don't require Maths so if you don't want to do the Maths you would still be able to study CompSci, pass the course and get a job.

    However Universities that require Maths will have better and harder degrees, and their grads will go onto better jobs. If a University doesn't say that you need a Maths A Level to get onto the course then it won't matter, they aren't going to accept people onto the course if they are just going to fail.
    Yeah, the problem I'm having is finding a decent enough university without requiring GCSE Maths B or A level Maths. Currently I have Ulster University, Edge Hill and Bournemouth. I have to make 5 choices. I think personally it may be better doing the foundation degree even though it may take a year longer. What would you think and any other universities I might have a chance of getting into that are decent enough to get me a job? Here in Northern Ireland there are hundred's of jobs for software engineer's in all different languages.
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    (Original post by Ross M)
    Yeah, the problem I'm having is finding a decent enough university without requiring GCSE Maths B or A level Maths. Currently I have Ulster University, Edge Hill and Bournemouth. I have to make 5 choices. I think personally it may be better doing the foundation degree even though it may take a year longer. What would you think and any other universities I might have a chance of getting into that are decent enough to get me a job? Here in Northern Ireland there are hundred's of jobs for software engineer's in all different languages.
    I don't know much about foundation degrees but I would say doing a foundation and sacrificing a year to get into a good uni would be a much better choice than going to a not so good uni. But you can still get into a decent uni this year if you work hard, Hull's CompSci entry is about BBC and Lincoln's is BBB, or as you have 5 choices you could apply to some CompSci courses and some foundation so you have both options open.

    As far as I'm aware there are a lot of jobs in Computing that don't require degrees so it doesn't matter where you go, as long as you have the experience. Of course a better degree would be very helpful, I wouldn't worry too much. If you're good at programming I'm sure you will get a job
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    (Original post by Ross M)
    Hi,

    I'm having a bit of a dilemma as I come from Northern Ireland and I'm having to pick a University in England to possibly study Computer Science at which I have no idea about. I was wondering what Uni would be best for A level Grades CCC (240 UCAS points) + 110 UCAS points from Music Exams = 350 UCAS Points.

    I'm currently studying:
    ICT
    Business Studies
    Music

    GCSE:
    Maths - C
    ICT - A

    I am more of a practical person than a theoretical person so would prefer a more hands on type of CompSci degree course.

    If you need anymore info to make a suggestion, just ask, thanks.
    I would recommend a foundation since you would have more knowledge and experience than your peers at first year.Also you can look at buisness information systems

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    (Original post by CloakedSpartan)
    You definitely need to hunt out a 100% vocational degree in say IT. ICT is barely related to Computer Science other than that they both involve a computer, and a grade C at GCSE maths and no maths a-level means you pretty much have no real chance of getting onto most compsci passes or passing them.

    Just making this 100% clear, sorry.
    This is inaccurate lol. Yes, it's a theory based subject but the vast majority of of Uni's only require a C in GCSE maths without A level. If they allow these requirements, they expect you to pass and do well on the course, not fail or they wouldn't enrol you to begin with. I personally got an A in GCSE, but talked to people with B's and C's in good quality Uni's and they did fine.
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    (Original post by Ross M)
    I code sometimes in my spare time and I know I'm capable of doing it. As Coding isn't everything I think I'm quite a good logical thinker even though I only achieved a C at GCSE Maths. Do you think I'd be better doing a foundation degree and then try getting in that way?
    No you're fine, he/she was just being brutal, there is a reason extremely few Uni's ask for A level Maths or anything above a C at GCSE. They wouldn't enrol you if they think you're not capable, it would only look bad on them too. However, yes of course it's theory based and you will have to work hard. To answer your question good Uni's to look out for our DMU and Lincoln which are both top 40 and practical, with good competitive graduate salaries.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    No you're fine, he/she was just being brutal, there is a reason extremely few Uni's ask for A level Maths or anything above a C at GCSE. They wouldn't enrol you if they think you're not capable, it would only look bad on them too. However, yes of course it's theory based and you will have to work hard. To answer your question good Uni's to look out for our DMU and Lincoln which are both top 40 and practical, with good competitive graduate salaries.
    Okay, thanks for the advise.
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    CloakedSpartan is actually very accurate... Computer Science is mostly applied mathematics, hence why many universities require an A Level in Maths particularly for Computer Science and recommend an A2 in Physics, Computing and/or a minimum of an AS in Further Maths.

    Ross M, If you are a more practical person, then an IT degree may be the best way to go. IT graduates learn some similar content to CompSci graduates, such as databases, but focus on the practical elements rather than the theory. Another alternative may be a foundation degree in CompSci before you start your first year, so that you can catch up on the maths content or try a joint honors Computing and Business or IT and Business degree.
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    (Original post by Krimzar)
    CloakedSpartan is actually very accurate... Computer Science is mostly applied mathematics, hence why many universities require an A Level in Maths particularly for Computer Science and recommend an A2 in Physics, Computing and/or a minimum of an AS in Further Maths.

    Ross M, If you are a more practical person, then an IT degree may be the best way to go. IT graduates learn some similar content to CompSci graduates, such as databases, but focus on the practical elements rather than the theory. Another alternative may be a foundation degree in CompSci before you start your first year, so that you can catch up on the maths content or try a joint honors Computing and Business or IT and Business degree.
    There are many more Unis that don't ask for it but people always like concentrating on the ten or so that do. Remember there are another one hundred Unis out there and many are still good.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    There are many more Unis that don't ask for it but people always like concentrating on the ten or so that do. Remember there are another one hundred Unis out there and many are still good.
    I have to disagree... Most universities require Maths for Computer Science. It is a select few that have it as optional.
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    (Original post by Krimzar)
    I have to disagree... Most universities require Maths for Computer Science. It is a select few that have it as optional.
    Your mostly right with that, a few decent ones who don't specialise in it but offer good courses and have good statistics don't. Most of the major ones such as Cambridge, Oxford etc. do.
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    (Original post by Krimzar)
    I have to disagree... Most universities require Maths for Computer Science. It is a select few that have it as optional.
    That is incorrect. Only the top 15 ish unis require Maths, the rest (including the remainder of the top 30) are perfectly fine with a grade B in Maths at GCSE.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    That is incorrect. Only the top 15 ish unis require Maths, the rest (including the remainder of the top 30) are perfectly fine with a grade B in Maths at GCSE.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Not sure why people always make sweeping stereotypical comments about maths when it comes to computer science, thousands of people go into degrees without maths and do well and always will do. Yes, it's a theory based subject but everyone gets their problem solving skills in different ways.
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    Look at Northumbria university - there are various computer science / computer related degrees - ie - networks and cyber security - my son is there doing compscience - the uni teach you the math you need - Derby I think wanted 280 ucas last year from A2 s and would let you use 40 ucas points from AS - Staffordshire was another that wanted 240 or so - also the accommodation at Northumbria is great and cheap - and they can guarantee accommodation for all 1st years - not something all unis can guarantee.
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    (Original post by Minionmum)
    Look at Northumbria university - there are various computer science / computer related degrees - ie - networks and cyber security - my son is there doing compscience - the uni teach you the math you need - Derby I think wanted 280 ucas last year from A2 s and would let you use 40 ucas points from AS - Staffordshire was another that wanted 240 or so - also the accommodation at Northumbria is great and cheap - and they can guarantee accommodation for all 1st years - not something all unis can guarantee.
    Some good information you've given me. Great hearing it from someone who knows what they're talking about! Thanks.
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    QMUL foundation course needs the equivalent points of 3Cs...
 
 
 
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