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Getting to Cambridge: STEP by STEP! Watch

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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Sorry, I didn't use anything other than examsolutions and past papers! (although I used the official Edexcel textbook for FP3, but that's it) so I don't have any personal recommendations!
    Would you say you're a natural in maths or a keen interest in maths is just all that it takes to succeed in it? I'm quite jealous of your achievements though

    Although this gives me hope I can finish F.M. CIE in about 7 months
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Sorry, I didn't use anything other than examsolutions and past papers! (although I used the official Edexcel textbook for FP3, but that's it) so I don't have any personal recommendations!



    Yeees! I'm not sure if you've heard of "Alegbra and Geometry" by Alan Beardon? It's on the IA recommendation list and very interesting! Part of it is on groups as well.

    Other than that, your Easter plans sound swell! Do let me know if you come across any interesting books from the list that you think is a must-read!
    If you can get your hands on "Pure Maths 1and 2" by S L Parsonson, it'll make interesting reading.
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    If you can get your hands on "Pure Maths 1and 2" by S L Parsonson, it'll make interesting reading.
    Me? I think that's a bit useless at this stage. I'd rather read more rigorous things like "Algebra and Geometry" by A.B or other books off the Cambridge tripos reading list (A first course in analysis looks lovely as well!) - but thank you for the recommendation!
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Me? I think that's a bit useless at this stage. I'd rather read more rigorous things like "Algebra and Geometry" by A.B or other books off the Cambridge tripos reading list (A first course in analysis looks lovely as well!) - but thank you for the recommendation!
    Not sure what level you're at (I know you're still at school but you could be IMO level) but the books I suggested are aimed at pre-uni students but are very old 1950s A-Levels, so is quite different to modern day books.

    Might even be able to download a copy.

    Re analysis, I was using Mathematical Analysis by K G Binmore.

    Not sure these questions fare when compard to BMO:

    http://www.edb.gov.hk/en/curriculum-...mo-papers.html
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    Not sure what level you're at (I know you're still at school but you could be IMO level) but the books I suggested are aimed at pre-uni students but are very old 1950s A-Levels, so is quite different to modern day books.

    Might even be able to download a copy.

    Re analysis, I was using Mathematical Analysis by K G Binmore.
    Aye, but it'd just be the same content or pre-uni content taught in a different (albeit more rigorous way), I'll have a look anyway, thanks.

    Re: analysis, I was recommended this book just today itself, what were your thoughts?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Aye, but it'd just be the same content or pre-uni content taught in a different (albeit more rigorous way), I'll have a look anyway, thanks.

    Re: analysis, I was recommended this book just today itself, what were your thoughts?
    It's been a VERY long time since I graduated, (to give you an idea, S-Levels were still around and STEP 1 and 3 were on the same day, to prevent you taking both) but as far as I can remember, it was quite a good read.

    Analysis is a course most undergrads find difficult because it's not something they've encountered before.

    Algebra is less daunting, as school used to cover group theory and matrix algebra.

    I particularly liked the "tests" eg D'Alembert's ratio test or nth root test but they also featured in A-Level books like "A Core Couse in A-Level Maths" by Bostock & Chandler.
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    It's been a VERY long time since I graduated, (to give you an idea, S-Levels were still around and STEP 1 and 3 were on the same day, to prevent you taking both) but as far as I can remember, it was quite a good read.

    Analysis is a course most undergrads find difficult because it's not something they've encountered before.

    Algebra is less daunting, as school used to cover group theory and matrix algebra.

    I particularly liked the "tests" eg D'Alembert's ratio test or nth root test.
    I'll give it a look in that case, thanks!

    Aye, the tests are fun but from the little I've been doing, I seem to really like fiddling about with epsilon-deltas proofs. By the way, I've been meaning to ask - would things like injectivity, surjectivity and their nitty gritty definitions be covered in Analysis or Algebra?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I'll give it a look in that case, thanks!

    Aye, the tests are fun but from the little I've been doing, I seem to really like fiddling about with epsilon-deltas proofs. By the way, I've been meaning to ask - would things like injectivity, surjectivity and their nitty gritty definitions be covered in Analysis or Algebra?
    I am NOTa strong mathematician unfortunately but I am blessed with a good memory,

    From what I can recall, these were covered in analysis. Definitions such as bijection means "one to one and onto" whatever that means!

    Algebra contained defns such as isomorphism, congruence, etc.

    Alg courses included groups, group rep, rings, alg number theory, lin alg and geom.

    Analysis had complex analysis, functional analysis, real analysis, prob from a pure perspective, analytical geometry (as oppsed to differential geom) and analytical number theory.

    Most people at school would not have come across pure, so really chooses between applied and stats.

    Why are you so interested in pure?
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    I am NOTa strong mathematician unfortunately but I am blessed with a good memory,

    From what I can recall, these were covered in analysis. Definitions such as bijection means "one to one and onto" whatever that means!

    Algebra contained defns such as isomorphism, congruence, etc.

    Alg courses included groups, group rep, rings, alg number theory, lin alg and geom.

    Analysis had complex analysis, functional analysis, real analysis, prob from a pure perspective, analytical geometry (as oppsed to differential geom) and analytical number theory.

    Most people at school would not have come across pure, so really chooses between applied and stats.

    Why are you so interested in pure?
    Yikes, that sounds very heavy. Thanks for it!

    I haven't quite sworn myself to pure or applied yet, I'm keeping my options open, which is partly why I did M1-3 and S1-3. I'll settle on something once I've had some proper exposure to it.

    But partly, I seem to feel an inexorable attraction to pure, it's what makes the most 'sense' to me and the feeling after grasping a concept that you've struggled with after ages is very nice. It's more abstract than the 'applied' stuff (from what I've heard: applied at uni is pure at A-Level, so that checks out) which is more computational and technique-y and hence carries (in my opinion) less reward.

    That wasn't explained very well, but that's abouut the gist of it. :laugh:
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Yikes, that sounds very heavy. Thanks for it!

    I haven't quite sworn myself to pure or applied yet, I'm keeping my options open, which is partly why I did M1-3 and S1-3. I'll settle on something once I've had some proper exposure to it.

    But partly, I seem to feel an inexorable attraction to pure, it's what makes the most 'sense' to me and the feeling after grasping a concept that you've struggled with after ages is very nice. It's more abstract than the 'applied' stuff (from what I've heard: applied at uni is pure at A-Level, so that checks out) which is more computational and technique-y and hence carries (in my opinion) less reward.

    That wasn't explained very well, but that's abouut the gist of it. :laugh:
    Yes, school pure maths is called methods and is classed, if anything, as applied.

    I did MEI maths, which consisted of 2 papers for A-Level and 2 for FM.

    Paper 2 included mechanics and mathematical physics, as well as stats, though my school only taught stats, so I was penalised very heavily, as the FM paper was choose 7 questions from 18, meaning for my class, it was choose 7 from 9!

    Naturally I could only do / choose pure and stats at uni, severely limiting my options.

    Uni pure is an acquired taste I feel. A comtemporary of mine was, like yourself, adamant on doing applied but eventually ended up with a PhD in Group Theory!

    What's your liking of programming? A good applied mathematician cannot get away from it.

    I personally hated it, we did FORTRAN in my days, yet now I'm a programmer!

    You prefer analysis or algebra?

    For example Riemann Integrals or The Rank Nullity Theorem, which believe it or not, has it's practical uses in stats!
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    Yes, school pure maths is called methods and is classed, if anything, as applied.

    I did MEI maths, which consisted of 2 papers for A-Level and 2 for FM.

    Paper 2 included mechanics and mathematical physics, as well as stats, though my school only taught stats, so I was penalised very heavily, as the FM paper was choose 7 questions from 18, meaning for my class, it was choose 7 from 9!

    Naturally I could only do pure and stats at uni, severely limiting my options.

    Uni pure is an acquired taste I feel. A comtemporary of mine was like yourself, adamant on doing applied but eventually ended up with a PhD in Group Theory!

    What's your liking of programming? A good applied mathematician cannot get away from it.

    I personally hated it, we did FORTRAN in my days, yet now I'm a programmer!

    You prefer analysis or algebra?

    For example Riemann Integrals or The Rank Nulity Theorem, which believe it or not, has it's practical uses in stats!
    Ouch, that sounds bad. I can empathise because my applied skills aren't quite up to par which severely cuts my choice in STEP III.

    I've had a dabble or two in programming, mainly tried my hand out at Python and whilst it was okay, there wasn't anything wow about it I feel. I know that if you go into stats or the like, you make heavy use of things like 'R' or 'MATLAB' - I suppose it's an acquired taste.

    What kind of programming do you do? How useful is a maths degree in everyday programming life?

    I used to think I prefer Algebra, but I'm starting to think that I have a very soft spot for Analysis as of late; perhaps because I haven't seen some of the really overbearingly over-rigorous stuff yet. :laugh:
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    Pure horror
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    (Original post by Student403)


    Pure horror
    :rofl: PRSOM It doesn't feel like two days... doe
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    :rofl: PRSOM It doesn't feel like two days... doe
    Time flies when you're having fun
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Time flies when you're having fun
    Wait, people are enjoying Easter and not revising? :eek4: What has this world come to? Idek myself anymoar!
    Spoiler:
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    Still waiting for that easter egg :moon:
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    Wait, people are enjoying Easter and not revising? :eek4: What has this world come to? Idek myself anymoar!
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Still waiting for that easter egg :moon:
    I'm really sick atm so the "enjoying myself" part cancels out Neutral holiday :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    I'm really sick atm so the "enjoying myself" part cancels out Neutral holiday :rolleyes:
    Hope you feel better soon! :hugs:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    I'm really sick atm so the "enjoying myself" part cancels out Neutral holiday :rolleyes:
    Aww shaz man, feel better soon! Meanwhile on #PlanetBrokeAF :laugh:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    I'm really sick atm so the "enjoying myself" part cancels out Neutral holiday :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by tinkerbella~)
    Hope you feel better soon! :hugs:
    (Original post by Imperion)
    Aww shaz man, feel better soon! Meanwhile on #PlanetBrokeAF :laugh:
    Thank you both :hugs: Happy Easter if you guys celebrate!


    (Original post by Zacken)
    :rofl: This thread did.. For 2 whole days :eek2:
 
 
 
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