super_qi2
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Reading the Apprentice website on the BBC and it said 'The ex-public school boy, with a double first from Cambridge' regarding Simon, and I was wondering what is a double first? And whats this about him fnishing Cambridge a year early, do people do that? lol
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Phil.Murray
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Is it the same as a starred first? I dunno!
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Dionysus
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A "Double First" can refer to First-Class Honours in two separate subjects, e.g., Classics and Mathematics, or alternatively to First-Class Honours in the same subject in subsequent examinations, such as subsequent Parts of the Tripos at the University of Cambridge.

A Cambridge "Double First" originally referred to a first in two different Triposes. The phrase "Double First" originally referred to people who got firsts in both the classical and mathematical Triposes ("double men"). The two-Tripos criterion for a "double first", even in vaguely related subjects as English and History, constitutes a far higher hurdle than simply repeating the same performance in competition with the same students in a Part II of the same Tripos; it is harder because the subject matter is different, and the candidate has to reach a mark of excellence in competition with people who would have been studying the subject for longer at university level.

At Cambridge it is possible to obtain a Double Starred First (noted recipients being Quentin Skinner, Alain de Botton, Enoch Powell, Lee Kuan Yew and Orlando Figes), or, in extremely rare cases such as Maurice Zinkin[1], Neal Ascherson and Abba Eban, a Triple-Starred First.
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Wangers
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Used to refer to men who got 1sts in the Classics and Science Tripos, nowadays its usually 2 1sts in 2 parts of one Tripos.
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Phil.Murray
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Wow
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Posh Portia Kabine
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I didn't get that thing about Simon finishing a year early either; sounds suspect to me!
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FLS2691
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From Wikipedia, re Field Marshal Smuts:

At Stellenbosch, he learned High Dutch, German, and Ancient Greek, and immersed himself further in literature, the classics, and Bible studies. His deeply traditional upbringing and serious outlook led to social isolation from his peers. However, he made outstanding academic progress, graduating in 1891 with double First-class honours in Literature and Science. During his last years at Stellenbosch, Smuts began to cast off some of his shyness and reserve, and it was at this time that he met Isie Krige, whom he was later to marry.

On graduation from Victoria College, Smuts won the Ebden scholarship for overseas study. He decided travel to the United Kingdom to read law at Christ's College, Cambridge. Smuts found it difficult to settle at Cambridge; he felt homesick and isolated by his age and different upbringing from the English undergraduates. Worries over money also contributed to his unhappiness, as his scholarship was insufficient to cover his university expenses. He confided these worries to a friend from Victoria College, Professor JI Marais. In reply, Professor Marais enclosed a cheque for a substantial sum, by way of loan, urging Smuts not to hesitate to approach him should he ever find himself in need.[2] Thanks to Marais, Smuts financial standing was secure. He gradually began to enter more into the social aspects of the university, although he retained his single-minded dedication to his studies.

During his time in Cambridge, he found time to study a diverse number of subjects in addition to law; he wrote a book, Walt Whitman: A Study in the Evolution of Personality, although it was unpublished. The thoughts behind this book laid the foundation for Smuts' later wide-ranging philosophy of holism.

Smuts graduated in 1893 with a double First. Over the previous two years, he had been the recipient of numerous academic prizes and accolades, including the coveted George Long prize in Roman Law and Jurisprudence.[3] One of his tutors, Professor Maitland, described Smuts as the most brilliant student he had ever met.[4] Lord Todd, the Master of Christ's College said in 1970 that "in 500 years of the College's history, of all its members, past and present, three had been truly outstanding: John Milton, Charles Darwin and Jan Smuts" [5]

Looks like two years to me.
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Epicurus
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I asked a similar question a year back. Here's the link.

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...13#post4876913
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super_qi2
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(Original post by Visiting_Babylon)
I didn't get that thing about Simon finishing a year early either; sounds suspect to me!
I'm sure they said that on the show, but I might be going a bit crazy, lol. Think I'm going crazy....arghhh, lol

Wow, thats boss, haha.
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epitome
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Simon actually got a 2:2. Apparently it was his grandfather who said the double first thing, and it's untrue.
No idea about the finishing a yr early thing...
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Mithent
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I'm pretty sure I heard about him finishing a year early on the programme, but it does sound very unlikely considering the requirement to keep term - even if he somehow sat all the Tripos examinations in a year less than normal, which would be very unlikely, graduating a year early in a three-year degree would mean you'd only kept six terms.
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DFranklin
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(Original post by Mithent)
I'm pretty sure I heard about him finishing a year early on the programme, but it does sound very unlikely considering the requirement to keep term - even if he somehow sat all the Tripos examinations in a year less than normal, which would be very unlikely, graduating a year early in a three-year degree would mean you'd only kept six terms.
Yeah. I know when I (briefly!) looked at skipping a year, I was told "well, you can do Part II early and do part III in your 3rd year, but you have to be here 3 full years".
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hyper-little-mushroom-men
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Maybe they meant that he went up to university a year early?? :confused:
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super_qi2
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(Original post by Mithent)
I'm pretty sure I heard about him finishing a year early on the programme, but it does sound very unlikely considering the requirement to keep term - even if he somehow sat all the Tripos examinations in a year less than normal, which would be very unlikely, graduating a year early in a three-year degree would mean you'd only kept six terms.
Glad am not going crazy, hehe.
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super_qi2
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(Original post by Cage)
At Cambridge it is possible to obtain a Double Starred First (noted recipients being Quentin Skinner, Alain de Botton, Enoch Powell, Lee Kuan Yew and Orlando Figes), or, in extremely rare cases such as Maurice Zinkin[1], Neal Ascherson and Abba Eban, a Triple-Starred First.
Do you rekon you can buy 1 on Ebay, coz i want one, hehehe
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jam_sister
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Ah good old Jan Smuts
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Craghyrax
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(Original post by jam_sister)
Ah good old Jan Smuts
;yes;
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Alan Smithee
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(Original post by Wikipedia)
A "Double First" can refer to First-Class Honours in two separate subjects, e.g., Classics and Mathematics, or alternatively to First-Class Honours in the same subject in subsequent examinations, such as subsequent Parts of the Tripos at the University of Cambridge.
There, thread done.
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ukebert
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#19
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So what is the difference between a first and a starred first? Sorry, I'm still confused
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Simba
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#20
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(Original post by ukebert)
So what is the difference between a first and a starred first? Sorry, I'm still confused
I think a starred first is simply just a 'first but better' if you will, in one subject.
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