jason1297
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I live close enough to my University where it'll be a waste of money to stay there and not commute. If I stay at home, will it be too hard to socialise/make friends?
I'd still spend freshers at the uni, and would go for nights out (not just go for lectures and go home), I just wouldn't be staying in halls. My current plan is to stay at home the first year, and see about getting accommodation with friends in years 2/3.
Does this sound like a wise idea to people who stayed at home? I know some people will jump on and say I won't have a freshers/won't make friends etc but surely all this depends on how sociable you are?
0
reply
Crumpet1
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
It is doable, especially if you are a social person.

But think about this - it isn't only about the money. Being in hall is an opportunity to leave home and gain your independence in a very safe way. You learn how to cope with feeding yourself and balancing some finances, without having to deal with all the bills (that extra responsibility comes in the second year). You're also doing all that with a group of other people who are going through the same thing with you. It is also a new skill to learn how to live with a group of peers. (Parents tolerate a lot more [email protected] than others will.) Finally you are on site for study and fun, without the fun-blocker of having to commute home every night.
0
reply
SophieSmall
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
If you make an effort you will make friends, but I'd be lying if I said it won't restrict you if you are living at home.

For example the only friends I made during my time at university were due to living away (I met a few friends in my halls and they introduced me to pretty much all the friends I have now), as I found it difficult making friends on my course.

Nights out also would have essentially been a no, if I had no-ones to stay at afterwards. And when you're only just getting to know people, they likely aren't going to jump at the chance of having you stay the night when uni accommodation is cramped as it is. As Usually the night don't start til 9-10pm earliest for pre-drinks. And last train home was just past 11 (taxi would have been out of the question expensive on my budget).

I agree with the poster above. That it's not just the cost you need to think about.

If you're confident you will make friends on your course and you don't particularity want to go on nights out, then sure staying at home is fine.
0
reply
kiriyu2013
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
I'm staying at home for uni, but mainly because i've just purchased my own house! Hoping to get involved a bit with stuff to make friends.
0
reply
confused9989
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
I'm staying at home and have a lot of friends who also commute. It honestly makes no difference.
0
reply
username3441700
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by jason1297)
I live close enough to my University where it'll be a waste of money to stay there and not commute. If I stay at home, will it be too hard to socialise/make friends?
I'd still spend freshers at the uni, and would go for nights out (not just go for lectures and go home), I just wouldn't be staying in halls. My current plan is to stay at home the first year, and see about getting accommodation with friends in years 2/3.
Does this sound like a wise idea to people who stayed at home? I know some people will jump on and say I won't have a freshers/won't make friends etc but surely all this depends on how sociable you are?
I don't think its a bad idea. It may seem like you'll be socially limited but it may be wise to make friends with people on your course and join societies so that you can make more friends.
0
reply
physicsamor
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
I'm staying at home too and I feel the same!! But my cousin who went to the same uni I am going to also stayed at home and she had a great social life, she was involved in a lot of societies and she used to stay round friends on a night out! She loved her uni experience.
0
reply
jonathanemptage
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by jason1297)
I live close enough to my University where it'll be a waste of money to stay there and not commute. If I stay at home, will it be too hard to socialise/make friends?
I'd still spend freshers at the uni, and would go for nights out (not just go for lectures and go home), I just wouldn't be staying in halls. My current plan is to stay at home the first year, and see about getting accommodation with friends in years 2/3.
Does this sound like a wise idea to people who stayed at home? I know some people will jump on and say I won't have a freshers/won't make friends etc but surely all this depends on how sociable you are?
Being sociable does of course help but not living in halls does hinder your ability to make friends as will your travel time your more than half an hour away yo can basically wave a good social life at uni goodbye.in the first couple of months or even the first year nights out will possibly mean a hotel room for a night.

One pit fall people who commute fall into is that they go home after lectures and stay there (I've seen it happen) so watch out for that and don't forget a huge amount of your course mates will be in accommodation and will at some points during the day particularly in those 9 hour breaks go back to the accommodation which will leave you with between 4-5 hours to kill after you've finished studying in the libary (You really can't do much good for beyond 4-5 hours a day if your also having lectures or labs).
0
reply
1TACH1337
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Crumpet1)
It is doable, especially if you are a social person.

But think about this - it isn't only about the money. Being in hall is an opportunity to leave home and gain your independence in a very safe way. You learn how to cope with feeding yourself and balancing some finances, without having to deal with all the bills (that extra responsibility comes in the second year). You're also doing all that with a group of other people who are going through the same thing with you. It is also a new skill to learn how to live with a group of peers. (Parents tolerate a lot more [email protected] than others will.) Finally you are on site for study and fun, without the fun-blocker of having to commute home every night.
but what if your like me
never going out to parties to get drunk and all that silly stuff
fun is being on my pc XD

and its london £6k a year just for rent, i would probably spend that much absolutely max (including a £1000 laptop) for the first year
family of 4 survives on less than £100 a week on essentials(not bills/tech), and that includes 10 kg of meat that will last for more than a week
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (97)
13.68%
I'm not sure (32)
4.51%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (221)
31.17%
I have already dropped out (17)
2.4%
I'm not a current university student (342)
48.24%

Watched Threads

View All