The Student Room Group

Staying Local for Uni

I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?
Original post by Bean_Cosmic
I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?
Hey @Bean_Cosmic

Although I can't give my view from personal experience of staying local many of course mates and majority of my uni friends did.

1.

You asked if staying local is a good experience and really this comes down to you for making the most of it and getting out from it what you want. There are pros and cons to both moving further away and staying at home but once you find a rhythm with transport, where you like to study best and balancing social and uni it really shouldn't make a difference if you stay at home.

2.

Saving money is a reason that many choose to stay at home and it is a valid one that all of my friends who stayed at home said. If you're fortunate enough to be in a position that you can stay and save it can be a great decision.

3.

People's experience can vary and ultimately it can be down to the relationship you have with your parents. Your growing up and changing but so are they and your relationship. Having clear communication and around the house expectations and boundaries can be helpful. Some of my friends who stayed at home would spend more time in the library whereas I often studied more I'm my flat unless group study so I ended up taking more "home" with me to do and had less of a clear home and uni split. In terms of socialising the friends that stayed at home never missed much and nights when they didn't get the last train home often crashed on another's sofa if need be.

4.

Being at home doesn't mean you have to not be independent. You'll need to be independently motivated for your studies so will buid skills there. Also being at home take the time to do your share of housework, cooking etc so that you are taking imitative and being prepared. Staying at home just with any opportunity if you aim to make the most of it, it can be a true blessing.

Best wishes for deciding. Catherine- University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
Reply 2
Original post by University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
Hey @Bean_Cosmic
Although I can't give my view from personal experience of staying local many of course mates and majority of my uni friends did.

1.

You asked if staying local is a good experience and really this comes down to you for making the most of it and getting out from it what you want. There are pros and cons to both moving further away and staying at home but once you find a rhythm with transport, where you like to study best and balancing social and uni it really shouldn't make a difference if you stay at home.

2.

Saving money is a reason that many choose to stay at home and it is a valid one that all of my friends who stayed at home said. If you're fortunate enough to be in a position that you can stay and save it can be a great decision.

3.

People's experience can vary and ultimately it can be down to the relationship you have with your parents. Your growing up and changing but so are they and your relationship. Having clear communication and around the house expectations and boundaries can be helpful. Some of my friends who stayed at home would spend more time in the library whereas I often studied more I'm my flat unless group study so I ended up taking more "home" with me to do and had less of a clear home and uni split. In terms of socialising the friends that stayed at home never missed much and nights when they didn't get the last train home often crashed on another's sofa if need be.

4.

Being at home doesn't mean you have to not be independent. You'll need to be independently motivated for your studies so will buid skills there. Also being at home take the time to do your share of housework, cooking etc so that you are taking imitative and being prepared. Staying at home just with any opportunity if you aim to make the most of it, it can be a true blessing.

Best wishes for deciding. Catherine- University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
Thank you so much! That's really helpful.
Original post by Bean_Cosmic
I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?
Hi !

I’m Lily, a second year psychology student here at ARU and I currently commute into uni.

In terms of how do I feel about commuting, I personally think it was the right choice for me. Going to uni in itself is a huge step in life, and then when I come home I get my home comforts. Personally I think I would’ve been too overwhelmed with moving away and that’s what steered me towards staying at home.

In terms of still living with family, I think it is down to your relationship with them. Personally ARU has a lot of commuting students who still live at home so it is not uncommon. I think as long as they realise you’re an adult now, boundaries are put in place but also you respect one another I think it will be fine. Obviously I don’t know about the university you’re are looking at but my uni has a lot of facilities you can use if you feel a bit overwhelmed so that can always be an option.

Of course there’s the topic of the financial aspect of university which is a common issue for students. I personally work a part time job to fund for my own things I want which makes me feel a lot more independent financially. My family pay for my food and toiletries, but I pay for things I want and also my car so that gives me an idea of what it’s like to have my own money and how to spend it wisely.

So with all this in mind, I don’t think it will put you off moving away for your postgrad. I think if you try these things and try to be a bit more independent it will set you up a little. Of course there’s always going to be that difference of moving away and staying at home, but if for right now you’re steering towards staying at home I wouldn’t let the future put you off staying. You’ll be much older by the time postgrad comes around, maybe have a bit more money and be more mature in general as well as the others around you.

I hope this helps and if there’s anything else please feel free to ask!

Lily - Digital Ambassador at ARU Temps
Reply 4
Original post by ARUStudents
Hi !
I’m Lily, a second year psychology student here at ARU and I currently commute into uni.
In terms of how do I feel about commuting, I personally think it was the right choice for me. Going to uni in itself is a huge step in life, and then when I come home I get my home comforts. Personally I think I would’ve been too overwhelmed with moving away and that’s what steered me towards staying at home.
In terms of still living with family, I think it is down to your relationship with them. Personally ARU has a lot of commuting students who still live at home so it is not uncommon. I think as long as they realise you’re an adult now, boundaries are put in place but also you respect one another I think it will be fine. Obviously I don’t know about the university you’re are looking at but my uni has a lot of facilities you can use if you feel a bit overwhelmed so that can always be an option.
Of course there’s the topic of the financial aspect of university which is a common issue for students. I personally work a part time job to fund for my own things I want which makes me feel a lot more independent financially. My family pay for my food and toiletries, but I pay for things I want and also my car so that gives me an idea of what it’s like to have my own money and how to spend it wisely.
So with all this in mind, I don’t think it will put you off moving away for your postgrad. I think if you try these things and try to be a bit more independent it will set you up a little. Of course there’s always going to be that difference of moving away and staying at home, but if for right now you’re steering towards staying at home I wouldn’t let the future put you off staying. You’ll be much older by the time postgrad comes around, maybe have a bit more money and be more mature in general as well as the others around you.
I hope this helps and if there’s anything else please feel free to ask!
Lily - Digital Ambassador at ARU Temps
Thank you! It's very helpful to hear your opinion and I think I feel less apprehensive about applying now :smile:
Original post by Bean_Cosmic
I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?

Hi @Bean_Cosmic!

As you've pointed out, going to a local university can save a lot of money on accommodation and food costs - and if it's a university that offers your course and you would have liked to attend regardless of its location, it makes sense to seriously consider it as an option. After all, you can still have a good level of independence even if you're living at home - you could perhaps to get a part-time job to save up for a postgrad without having to worry about too many expenses, or you could start prepping your own meals to take to uni.

It's important to remember that there's not one objectively 'right' university experience - lots of people want different things out of university, and that's perfectly okay. Whether you're just there to get a degree and further your job prospects, or you want to pick up some new hobbies or get involved with more sports, it's about deciding what the best experience is for you. If you have a good relationship with your parents and you're happy to continue living alongside them for the next few years, you can still have a good university experience whilst doing that. :biggrin:

Have you discussed your plans with your parents yet? How do they feel about you staying local/commuting to university?

Eve (Kingston Rep).
Original post by Bean_Cosmic
I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?
Hi there,

Staying at home during uni can indeed save a lot on costs and can be a great option if your local university offers a strong program for your intended course. However, the experience can vary greatly depending on personal circumstances. Living at home doesn't necessarily mean you'll miss out on the uni experience, as you can still participate in clubs, societies, and other campus activities. It's about finding the right balance. As for independence, living at home does not mean you can't learn important life skills. You can take on responsibilities at home, find a part-time job, manage your own studies, and so on. Everyone's journey is unique, and what works for one person might not work for another. Consider what feels right for you there's no one-size-fits-all answer to this.

Take care,
Ilya :smile:
Original post by Bean_Cosmic
I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?
Hey @bean_cosmic,
I’ve done it both ways, so I go to a university which is pretty far from where I lived, so during my ba, I stayed on my own in a student accommodation flat. I found that having my own place had both benefits and drawbacks. So, some drawbacks included feeling very isolated during my first year, mainly when there was the considerable cost of all-inclusive rent. However, there were some positives, like developing independence skills through being responsible for my own bills and the upkeep and maintenance of my own place.

I am now doing a PGCE in primary education, and I currently live with my partner’s family and then commute. I think for the intenseness of the PGCE with placements and everything; I have heavily benefited from living in a family environment as it reduces cost so I have more money for travel, it has also allowed me more time to relax, which is definitely needed after a long day on placement. And having that family environment to vent and decompress after a long day on placement has honestly been invaluable.

So to sum up, ultimately, the decision comes down to your course and its intensity. But don’t be afraid to stay in that home environment as many of the independent skills I have gained are just from being in that university community around like-minded people.

I hope this helps,
Jade
University of Sunderland Ambassador
BA Photography Video and Digital Imaging
Current PGCE in Primary Education
Original post by Bean_Cosmic
I just want to ask anyone who's stayed in their local town/city for uni if it was a good experience.
The uni I'm near is a really good one for the course I want to do and if I went there I could stay living at home with my parents which would save so much on accommodation and food costs.
Do you think I'd go crazy from living with parents and would my uni experience be worse than others?
Also, do you think it will make me completely unprepared to be independent when I do my postgrad somewhere else?


Hi there,

I don't commute myself but I have a lot of friends that do so I thought id give you some pros and cons of commuting from what I have seen and experienced.

Pros:

1- You save a lot of money on rent and also on food. Even if you pay rent at home to the people you live with, it is likely to be a lot cheaper than living in halls. The same thing applies with food - even if you pay towards food at home it is likely to be a lot less than you would be if you were living at uni.

2- You still have the comfort of living at home, especially if you feel a bit more nervous about coming to uni this is one less thing that you have to worry about. I know someone who didn't want to start too many new things at once so lived at home while in first year to get used to the uni itself and then moved out in second year.

3- You always have the option of living out another year. You could move into halls for your second year, or you may find a group of friends that you want to live with. Just because you lived at home in first year doesn't mean you are tied to doing this every year so don't worry about this!

4- You are still close to your friends and family at home, as well as getting to see your friends at uni! This means you could have the best of both worlds and get to see all of your friends and family regularly, at uni and at home.

Cons:

1- You still have to think about transport costs. Whether this is the train or petrol and parking, this is still a cost you would have to factor in. If you are close by it won't be too expensive but you never know how many days you will be in etc so it could add up to more than you think.

2- Again with the commute, if it takes a long time then this is a long time out of your day which could make the days quite long. You may also only be in uni for a morning or just one lecture so it may be a long way to travel if your timetable is spread out.

3- You may have to put more effort in with people in first year as you won't be living with people. This does not mean at all that you can't make friends, you might just have to be the one at first to make plans as you won't have those automatic friends in the people you live with especially in freshers week.

4- Uni is a great time to learn new things, like cooking and living alone etc which you wouldn't have at home. However, this isn't that important to some people and wasn't a dealbreaker for me when I decided to move into halls as I could still do these things at home if I wanted to.


Overall, it's a very subjective decision and it is different for everyone! I wouldn't say you will miss out if you are commuting as some of my best friends commute and it isn't an issue :smile:

I hope some of this helps!

Lucy -SHU student ambassador

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