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    Hi,

    just looking for some general guidance. I started Computer Science in 2000 but very quickly fell behind, and totally flunked both programming modules and all programming coursework - after 1 year I changed to Chemical Physics and a couple of years later graduated with a BSc Hons in Physics.

    At the start in Computer Science, I had no experience of programming going into the course. Everyone else seemed to know what they were doing. I didnt know 'how' to study it - reading the notes just didnt work. I wanted to ask questions in labs but basically didnt know where to start and when you fall behind its a recipe for disaster.

    But the thing is, I really want to study it again. Well, that and the fact that I feel I need to future proof my self in some way(been working as an Information Officer/FoI officer for nearly 10 years-good place to work but not what I want to do forever).

    Also looked at going into Accounting and am studying Spanish one night a week and in my spare time. But I really want to have another go at Computer Science, because I have huge interest in the subject generally and well, the possibilities for careers are endless.

    Has anyone else gone back into it? Or struggled with it then succeeded What is the best way to 'study' it?

    I feel like I'd be able to study smarter now and be less afraid to ask questions, but committing to an honours level course would be a big financial gamble if I'm unsure I'd be able to do well.

    Can't commit to a full time course right now(Im 34) - There are some evening degree courses and some online courses(University of Hertfordshire course looks excellent) though the evening courses would probably be preferable as at least help would be on hand.

    Just looking for any general thoughts on the above and how to 'study' and learn computer programming from those who have or are in the process of studying it.

    Cheers!
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    It's totally doable but it's a lot of work depending on experience you've got by now. One of my college teachers went back to do a degree at 40 in the evening at a uni in london. You'll find plenty of mature students here. In terms of programming/coding? Have you had any experience with it since originally trying uni? A good place to start is a a site such as code academy. Whilst it has its flaws it also helps initially. Learn the concepts of programming and languages. Understanding the theory behind coding something and how it works can help you then do the programming part. Links are all free and see how it goes. If you have any questions give me a shout and I can help you
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    (Original post by 8472)
    It's totally doable but it's a lot of work depending on experience you've got by now. One of my college teachers went back to do a degree at 40 in the evening at a uni in london. You'll find plenty of mature students here. In terms of programming/coding? Have you had any experience with it since originally trying uni? A good place to start is a a site such as code academy. Whilst it has its flaws it also helps initially. Learn the concepts of programming and languages. Understanding the theory behind coding something and how it works can help you then do the programming part. Links are all free and see how it goes. If you have any questions give me a shout and I can help you
    Thanks - yes, had some experience of using sites like CodeAcademy and read some notes and watched videos on youtube about different programming concepts. I forgot to mention that for one of the evening degree courses there is a pre-course with programming content/web authoring etc, which if you complete, you are guaranteed entry to the degree course. Probably the best way to dip my feet in the water again. Also, the one I am looking at is quite flexible in terms of how many modules you study at a time - you can do anything from 1-3 nights per week(plus lab). Thanks for your reply and encouragement!
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    Huh? I can't see the OP in this thread? TSR is weird sometimes

    Anyway, keeping in mind that the only thing I can see is the thread title, this online course might be useful to you as a re-introduction. Depending how much CS you remember from 18 years ago, you may or may not already know some of this stuff, but it's probably a good idea start from the beginning again after such a long time away from it:

    https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x
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    (Original post by Maestro88)
    Thanks - yes, had some experience of using sites like CodeAcademy and read some notes and watched videos on youtube about different programming concepts. I forgot to mention that for one of the evening degree courses there is a pre-course with programming content/web authoring etc, which if you complete, you are guaranteed entry to the degree course. Probably the best way to dip my feet in the water again. Also, the one I am looking at is quite flexible in terms of how many modules you study at a time - you can do anything from 1-3 nights per week(plus lab). Thanks for your reply and encouragement!
    Sounds like a good idea. You could also look at the Open University. In my last job working in Cyber Security a couple of guys had completed a degree there whilst working at Visa customer support before using it to move into a more technical IT job to now being a cyber consultant from the extra qualifications. Do you have an idea of a job role you'd want? Or are you mainly interested in being a developer/programmer?


    (Original post by winterscoming)
    Huh? I can't see the OP in this thread? TSR is weird sometimes
    Looks like a mod split OP or something from the thread. It was there a few minutes ago.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    Huh? I can't see the OP in this thread? TSR is weird sometimes

    Anyway, keeping in mind that the only thing I can see is the thread title, this online course might be useful to you as a re-introduction. Depending how much CS you remember from 18 years ago, you may or may not already know some of this stuff, but it's probably a good idea start from the beginning again after such a long time away from it:

    https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x
    I've just registered and posts go into moderation so maybe thats why, not sure! But thanks for the link, looks very useful!
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    (Original post by 8472)
    Sounds like a good idea. You could also look at the Open University. In my last job working in Cyber Security a couple of guys had completed a degree there whilst working at Visa customer support before using it to move into a more technical IT job to now being a cyber consultant from the extra qualifications. Do you have an idea of a job role you'd want? Or are you mainly interested in being a developer/programmer?




    Looks like a mod split OP or something from the thread. It was there a few minutes ago.
    I don't have a specific idea of the route I'd go down eventually - I've looked at the OU for other courses before and always thought it was a bt expensive but will have another look, thanks again.

    ps/. Oh, I made a small edit in my original post, maybe thats why its disappeared, gone into moderation again maybe?
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    (Original post by Maestro88)
    I don't have a specific idea of the route I'd go down eventually - I've looked at the OU for other courses before and always thought it was a bt expensive but will have another look, thanks again.

    ps/. Oh, I made a small edit in my original post, maybe thats why its disappeared, gone into moderation again maybe?
    Ah, yep, editing your posts as a brand new user would do that - I think you need to have been around the site for a little while (or maybe had a few rep upvotes?) before it'll just let you go and edit your posts for some reason.

    The OU is a good general route, but if the cost is a problem, you could see whether you'd be eligible for something like the Advanced Learner Loan -
    https://www.gov.uk/advanced-learner-loan
    (Edit - never mind, it looks like the OU isn't eligible for that one, it looks like you need to go through the normal student loans system for the OU, but it might be a good option for other courses.)

    Although, If you are willing to pay, then there are other options which open up too. If you want to look at a career in Networking, then Cisco CCNA and CCNP certification is considered to be quite valuable: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/traini...fications.html

    From personal experience having completed CCNA myself, I can tell you that it's fairly intense, and Cisco themselves set the bar quite high for people to pass, but IMO very worthwhile if Networking is what you're interested in:

    Alternatively, Treehouse is a fairly inexpensive way to get hold of some good quality, well structured courses specific to software engineering: https://teamtreehouse.com/tracks
    There's no information on Treehouse which you cannot find for free online however, so you're not paying for the information as much as the overall learning experience, course structure, etc. I would probably start out with the Harvard one I linked above before paying for Treehouse though, and definitely check out other free courses on edX as well, because those are all driven by various global top universities, or by companies like Microsoft, so the quality is there too.
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    Great advice, thanks!
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    (Original post by Maestro88)
    I don't have a specific idea of the route I'd go down eventually - I've looked at the OU for other courses before and always thought it was a bt expensive but will have another look, thanks again.

    ps/. Oh, I made a small edit in my original post, maybe thats why its disappeared, gone into moderation again maybe?
    Good luck then! I can recommend cyber if you want to make money. It's only going to grow going forward though I did leave it recently to follow my dream of working on films :lol:

    Yeah that'll trigger the post going to the mod queue.
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    (Original post by 8472)
    Good luck then! I can recommend cyber if you want to make money. It's only going to grow going forward though I did leave it recently to follow my dream of working on films :lol:

    Yeah that'll trigger the post going to the mod queue.
    Cyber does interest me alright but well done on following your dreams, life is too short not too! I am enjoying Spanish and its going me back into learning mode after a few years out!

    Thanks again
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    (Original post by Maestro88)
    Hi,

    just looking for some general guidance. I started Computer Science in 2000 but very quickly fell behind, and totally flunked both programming modules and all programming coursework - after 1 year I changed to Chemical Physics and a couple of years later graduated with a BSc Hons in Physics.

    At the start in Computer Science, I had no experience of programming going into the course. Everyone else seemed to know what they were doing. I didnt know 'how' to study it - reading the notes just didnt work. I wanted to ask questions in labs but basically didnt know where to start and when you fall behind its a recipe for disaster.

    But the thing is, I really want to study it again. Well, that and the fact that I feel I need to future proof my self in some way(been working as an Information Officer/FoI officer for nearly 10 years-good place to work but not what I want to do forever).

    Also looked at going into Accounting and am studying Spanish one night a week and in my spare time. But I really want to have another go at Computer Science, because I have huge interest in the subject generally and well, the possibilities for careers are endless.

    Has anyone else gone back into it? Or struggled with it then succeeded What is the best way to 'study' it?

    I feel like I'd be able to study smarter now and be less afraid to ask questions, but committing to an honours level course would be a big financial gamble if I'm unsure I'd be able to do well.

    Can't commit to a full time course right now(Im 34) - There are some evening degree courses and some online courses(University of Hertfordshire course looks excellent) though the evening courses would probably be preferable as at least help would be on hand.

    Just looking for any general thoughts on the above and how to 'study' and learn computer programming from those who have or are in the process of studying it.

    Cheers!
    Hello! It's never too late to go back to studying. I work for one of FAAMG and I can tell you that the number one trait we look for when hiring is a love for learning.

    Have you seen this?

    https://www.coursera.org/degrees/bac...science-london

    It was only announced two days ago and at £5.5K per year is much cheaper than alternatives. It ticks all the boxes in terms of a core curriculum which consists of intro programming, algorithms and data structures, and systems. Studying alongside a full-time job demonstrates true grit. You really need to be passionate about the subject, though. A degree is just the first step. Most people stop learning post-graduation. Demonstrate you can do this and have the desire to always grow and you stand a great chance at working for a top company, no matter your background. In fact, the technology sector sorely needs more diversity and we love hiring people from non-traditional backgrounds.

    You can do it.
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    (Original post by dwann)
    Hello! It's never too late to go back to studying. I work for one of FAAMG and I can tell you that the number one trait we look for when hiring is a love for learning.

    Have you seen this?

    https://www.coursera.org/degrees/bac...science-london

    It was only announced two days ago and at £5.5K per year is much cheaper than alternatives. It ticks all the boxes in terms of a core curriculum which consists of intro programming, algorithms and data structures, and systems. Studying alongside a full-time job demonstrates true grit. You really need to be passionate about the subject, though. A degree is just the first step. Most people stop learning post-graduation. Demonstrate you can do this and have the desire to always grow and you stand a great chance at working for a top company, no matter your background. In fact, the technology sector sorely needs more diversity and we love hiring people from non-traditional backgrounds.

    You can do it.
    Thanks very much for the encouragement and insight dwann, much appreciated! I had heard about that Coursera/Univeristy of London course so will definitely look into it in more detail, but the timing could work well for me and give me time to be well prepared before starting. I'm not sure how many students they will admit but I think I will register my interest anyway!
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    (Original post by Maestro88)
    Hi,

    just looking for some general guidance. I started Computer Science in 2000 but very quickly fell behind, and totally flunked both programming modules and all programming coursework - after 1 year I changed to Chemical Physics and a couple of years later graduated with a BSc Hons in Physics.

    At the start in Computer Science, I had no experience of programming going into the course. Everyone else seemed to know what they were doing. I didnt know 'how' to study it - reading the notes just didnt work. I wanted to ask questions in labs but basically didnt know where to start and when you fall behind its a recipe for disaster.

    But the thing is, I really want to study it again. Well, that and the fact that I feel I need to future proof my self in some way(been working as an Information Officer/FoI officer for nearly 10 years-good place to work but not what I want to do forever).

    Also looked at going into Accounting and am studying Spanish one night a week and in my spare time. But I really want to have another go at Computer Science, because I have huge interest in the subject generally and well, the possibilities for careers are endless.

    Has anyone else gone back into it? Or struggled with it then succeeded What is the best way to 'study' it?

    I feel like I'd be able to study smarter now and be less afraid to ask questions, but committing to an honours level course would be a big financial gamble if I'm unsure I'd be able to do well.

    Can't commit to a full time course right now(Im 34) - There are some evening degree courses and some online courses(University of Hertfordshire course looks excellent) though the evening courses would probably be preferable as at least help would be on hand.

    Just looking for any general thoughts on the above and how to 'study' and learn computer programming from those who have or are in the process of studying it.

    Cheers!
    Hi Maestro88


    It's great you're thinking of going back to studying Computer Science and considering Herts I've spoken to the Admissions Tutor for computer science and they let me know that the online programme sounds like a good option for you.

    The level of support is high - students have access to discussion forums, and there are also synchronous sessions using virtual classrooms, so students can interact with members of staff directly, rather than by email or discussion forums. Students on the course tend to be mature students and from professional backgrounds. Members of staff also teach the on-campus version of the modules and the distance learning provision is closely aligned with the on-campus provision. Students also have Administrative staff and Educational Technologists to support them.

    Hope that helps. If you have any questions or you'd like me to put you in touch with the tutor for this course, just let me know.

    Thanks,
    Heather
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    (Original post by University of Hertfordshire)
    Hi Maestro88


    It's great you're thinking of going back to studying Computer Science and considering Herts I've spoken to the Admissions Tutor for computer science and they let me know that the online programme sounds like a good option for you.

    The level of support is high - students have access to discussion forums, and there are also synchronous sessions using virtual classrooms, so students can interact with members of staff directly, rather than by email or discussion forums. Students on the course tend to be mature students and from professional backgrounds. Members of staff also teach the on-campus version of the modules and the distance learning provision is closely aligned with the on-campus provision. Students also have Administrative staff and Educational Technologists to support them.

    Hope that helps. If you have any questions or you'd like me to put you in touch with the tutor for this course, just let me know.

    Thanks,
    Heather
    Thanks for the info Heather, thats very helpful - yes I am definitely considering Herts and the course is very appealing - if I have any queries I will let you know soon, thanks again.
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    I'm also looking at going back to study computer science. I'm just starting my application for the Hertfordshire course, I only just about qualify so I'm hoping to be accepted, otherwise it will be the OU. I've been researching it for over a year now, even started applying but kept chickening out but I've decided to take the plunge, I'll be 39 by the time I complete it and feel as though I'll never do it if I don't do it now. I've been looking at a lot of the courses on https://www.edx.org/ which are helping me.
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    (Original post by Jeblee)
    I'm also looking at going back to study computer science. I'm just starting my application for the Hertfordshire course, I only just about qualify so I'm hoping to be accepted, otherwise it will be the OU. I've been researching it for over a year now, even started applying but kept chickening out but I've decided to take the plunge, I'll be 39 by the time I complete it and feel as though I'll never do it if I don't do it now. I've been looking at a lot of the courses on https://www.edx.org/ which are helping me.
    Hi Jeblee


    That's great you've decided to go for it! Just let me know if you have any questions or if there's anything I can help with.

    You might like to post over in the Hertfordshire forum, and in the applicant thread here, so you can meet some other mature students.

    Best of luck.

    Thanks,
    Heather
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    I recommend code studio where you can learn JavaScript and then ease yourself into python because they are really similar for the most part. Good job in not giving up , computer science is really fun and I’d say the best way to remember is to actually code it instead of reading over questions. Hope that made sense
 
 
 
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