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    I am currently in Year 12 and doing Maths, Biology, Chemistry amd Economics for AS. I am thinking of dropping Economics next year because I already feel like I am neglecting it due to the studying time that the sciences require. Since it is not Physics, would dropping it place me at any significant disadvantge?
    Many prospective medics at my school have an attitute that unless you have 4A*s you stand no chance for Medicine especially at Cambridge but is that true?
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    If you can find the section of the admissions page which states you require 4 A-levels at all, much less 4 A*s, I will buy you a cookie.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    If you can find the section of the admissions page which states you require 4 A-levels at all, much less 4 A*s, I will buy you a cookie.
    I think the OP is still looking in the hope of a 🍪 !

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    I always tell people who want to go to Cambridge to do 4 A levels. however for medicine, i would rather see you get top grades in the BMAT and spend your spare time doing work experience rather than extra hours studying. that said, economics isnt the hardest a level out there.
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    A 4A* prediction would be advantageos. A prediction of A*A*A is not sufficient though as I was recently informed by the admission tutor of a college...To be accurate, he said 'whilst A*A*A prediction is 'good' it is not 'competitive'...
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    If you can find the section of the admissions page which states you require 4 A-levels at all, much less 4 A*s, I will buy you a cookie.
    Thanks for that lucrative offer. I know it isn’t required but I suspect that the minimum entry requirement for the course is not really enough to make a competitive application so I was thinking whether having 4 would be looked upon favourably.
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    (Original post by Wolfram Alpha)
    A 4A* prediction would be advantageos. A prediction of A*A*A is not sufficient though as I was recently informed by the admission tutor of a college...To be accurate, he said 'whilst A*A*A prediction is 'good' it is not 'competitive'...
    Is this the case even if the 4th A Level is not very related to Medicine?
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    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    I always tell people who want to go to Cambridge to do 4 A levels. however for medicine, i would rather see you get top grades in the BMAT and spend your spare time doing work experience rather than extra hours studying. that said, economics isnt the hardest a level out there.
    I know- it’s not even comparable to the sciences (that is why I managed to pull off an A at the end of the first term without studying that much)- but it’s still a considerable amount of work (even more so in year 13 where I’ll have to revise the whole AS as well as the new material), that I don’t want to undertake if it won’t benefit me much.
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    (Original post by Wolfram Alpha)
    A 4A* prediction would be advantageos. A prediction of A*A*A is not sufficient though as I was recently informed by the admission tutor of a college...To be accurate, he said 'whilst A*A*A prediction is 'good' it is not 'competitive'...
    Yes. I haven’t heard of anyone getting in with anything less than 3A*s.
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    (Original post by andreasz)
    Thanks for that lucrative offer. I know it isn’t required but I suspect that the minimum entry requirement for the course is not really enough to make a competitive application so I was thinking whether having 4 would be looked upon favourably.
    They can't realistically "favour" an applicant with 4 A-levels over one with 3 A-levels, as it leads to a very murky ground regarding socioeconomic discrimination in academic admissions, something which is a very delicate subject for Cambridge generally...as such, taking an unrelated 4th A-level isn't going to realistically benefit you. Exceeding the minimum entry criteria by getting 3 A*s, doing exceptionally well in the BMAT, at interview, through work experience etc, should suffice.

    However a 4th subject, if you do well in it, isn't going to harm you - just bear in mind the opportunity cost of doing so (having to spread your focus more broadly, and put in more time to the academics which may limit your ability to undertake relevant work placements - which may be more valuable to other medical schools).
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    (Original post by andreasz)
    I am currently in Year 12 and doing Maths, Biology, Chemistry amd Economics for AS. I am thinking of dropping Economics next year because I already feel like I am neglecting it due to the studying time that the sciences require. Since it is not Physics, would dropping it place me at any significant disadvantge?
    Many prospective medics at my school have an attitute that unless you have 4A*s you stand no chance for Medicine especially at Cambridge but is that true?
    I presume most Cambridge medics will have done 4, but given your 4th is Economics, I don't really think dropping it would matter.

    They're unlikely to care much about Economics anyway.

    I would email them to check about it though, as I'm not 100% sure.
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    (Original post by andreasz)
    I am currently in Year 12 and doing Maths, Biology, Chemistry amd Economics for AS. I am thinking of dropping Economics next year because I already feel like I am neglecting it due to the studying time that the sciences require. Since it is not Physics, would dropping it place me at any significant disadvantge?
    Many prospective medics at my school have an attitute that unless you have 4A*s you stand no chance for Medicine especially at Cambridge but is that true?
    not as practical if you're doing linear A Levels.

    Also, I'm confident the number of applicants with 4 or more subjects will wane over time.

    Just try to get all A grades at AS and get predicted 3A* at A Level
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    I presume most Cambridge medics will have done 4, but given your 4th is Economics, I don't really think dropping it would matter.

    They're unlikely to care much about Economics anyway.

    I would email them to check about it though, as I'm not 100% sure.
    I’ve emailed them and they are just quoting their website to me basically.
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    Doonesbury
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    (Original post by andreasz)
    I am currently in Year 12 and doing Maths, Biology, Chemistry amd Economics for AS. I am thinking of dropping Economics next year because I already feel like I am neglecting it due to the studying time that the sciences require. Since it is not Physics, would dropping it place me at any significant disadvantge?
    Many prospective medics at my school have an attitute that unless you have 4A*s you stand no chance for Medicine especially at Cambridge but is that true?
    Right these were the words of the "Lecturer" who runs the medicine society. She began the medicine society, with the neccessary requirements of med schools, and she wanted to be frankly honest. The following is an account on her explanation: (DISCLAIMER)

    40% of medical applicants are immediately rejected. In the UK, there is approximately only 3000 places for medical schools. Therefore, considering the extreme competition, many universities have a filtering process.

    They immediately remove applicants below 7A*s. (Focus of Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants below the UKCAT threshold (Majority) (Not Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants who score less than (AAA) - The magic number to even be considered. Oxbridge will consider you if you have atleast (A*A*A) but more likley if you are predicted (A*A*A*).
    They immediately remove applicants below the BMAT threshold they have set. (Oxbridge and BMAT universities)

    Now that you've been fished from the majority of applicants, your personal statement will be considered.

    Work experience: Some universities have a recommended min of 6 months volunteering (Start Now) A quality work experience, with some element of the NHS
    (3-4 places).

    Supercurricular: Essays, research programmes, competitions, olympiads, STEM related activties.

    Extracurriculars: COMPLETELY IGNORED (As mentioned on Oxbridge websites)

    Generally, the majority of successful candiates completed 4 A levels, and have 4 A*s. The reality is that you need atleast 8/9 A* to stand out, the magic number being 9/10.

    Interviews: They want to recognise if you're a suitable potential student that can be accustomed to the traditional, collegiate and tutorial styled/based learning ad environment.

    Now economics and med?
    Should of chosen physics. Many universities want students who have got an A/A* in physics.

    Requirement: A/A* in English language 7/8/9 (Preferably 8/9) A* in Sciences GCSE

    Oxbridge: A* in Chemistry ( A level)
    A* Biology (A level) And
    A*/A in another Science subject

    your're 4th related stem subject it a backup A*, to ensure you get atleast 3A*s.


    This is the reality of medicine, and is the truth. IGNORE the silly anomalies and exceptions.

    Why Cambridge? Its so competitive. and if you don't meet the requirements, it really isn't worth considering, unless your extremely passionate, since it would be a wasted choice.
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    (Original post by Science99999)
    40% of medical applicants are immediately rejected. In the UK, there is approximately only 3000 places for medical schools. Therefore, considering the extreme competition, many universities have a filtering process.

    They immediately remove applicants below 7A*s. (Focus of Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants below the UKCAT threshold (Majority) (Not Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants who score less than (AAA) - The magic number to even be considered. Oxbridge will consider you if you have atleast (A*A*A) but more likley if you are predicted (A*A*A*).
    They immediately remove applicants below the BMAT threshold they have set. (Oxbridge and BMAT universities)

    Now that you've been fished from the majority of applicants, your personal statement will be considered.

    Work experience: Some universities have a recommended min of 6 months volunteering (Start Now) A quality work experience, with some element of the NHS
    (3-4 places).

    Supercurricular: Essays, research programmes, competitions, olympiads, STEM related activties.

    Extracurriculars: COMPLETELY IGNORED (As mentioned on Oxbridge websites)

    Generally, the majority of successful candiates completed 4 A levels, and have 4 A*s. The reality is that you need atleast 8/9 A* to stand out, the magic number being 9/10.

    Interviews: They want to recognise if you're a suitable potential student that can be accustomed to the traditional, collegiate and tutorial styled/based learning ad environment.

    Now economics and med?
    Should of chosen physics. Many universities want students who have got an A/A* in physics.

    Requirement: A/A* in English language 7/8/9 (Preferably 8/9) A* in Sciences GCSE

    Oxbridge: A* in Chemistry ( A level)
    A* Biology (A level) And
    A*/A in another Science subject

    your're 4th related stem subject it a backup A*, to ensure you get atleast 3A*s.


    This is the reality of medicine, and is the truth. IGNORE the silly anomalies and exceptions.

    Why Cambridge? Its so competitive. and if you don't meet the requirements, it really isn't worth considering, unless your extremely passionate, since it would be a wasted choice.
    Im gonna tag you here because you dismiss fake news well Doonesbury
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Im gonna tag you here because you dismiss fake news well Doonesbury
    Well if this is coming from a medical professional who has MORE EXPERIENCE with medical schools applications, then her provenance is much regarded.
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    (Original post by Science99999)
    Right these were the words of the "Lecturer" who runs the medicine society. She began the medicine society, with the neccessary requirements of med schools, and she wanted to be frankly honest. The following is an account on her explanation: (DISCLAIMER)

    40% of medical applicants are immediately rejected. In the UK, there is approximately only 3000 places for medical schools. Therefore, considering the extreme competition, many universities have a filtering process.

    They immediately remove applicants below 7A*s. (Focus of Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants below the UKCAT threshold (Majority) (Not Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants who score less than (AAA) - The magic number to even be considered. Oxbridge will consider you if you have atleast (A*A*A) but more likley if you are predicted (A*A*A*).
    They immediately remove applicants below the BMAT threshold they have set. (Oxbridge and BMAT universities)

    Now that you've been fished from the majority of applicants, your personal statement will be considered.

    Work experience: Some universities have a recommended min of 6 months volunteering (Start Now) A quality work experience, with some element of the NHS
    (3-4 places).

    Supercurricular: Essays, research programmes, competitions, olympiads, STEM related activties.

    Extracurriculars: COMPLETELY IGNORED (As mentioned on Oxbridge websites)

    Generally, the majority of successful candiates completed 4 A levels, and have 4 A*s. The reality is that you need atleast 8/9 A* to stand out, the magic number being 9/10.

    Interviews: They want to recognise if you're a suitable potential student that can be accustomed to the traditional, collegiate and tutorial styled/based learning ad environment.

    Now economics and med?
    Should of chosen physics. Many universities want students who have got an A/A* in physics.

    Requirement: A/A* in English language 7/8/9 (Preferably 8/9) A* in Sciences GCSE

    Oxbridge: A* in Chemistry ( A level)
    A* Biology (A level) And
    A*/A in another Science subject

    your're 4th related stem subject it a backup A*, to ensure you get atleast 3A*s.


    This is the reality of medicine, and is the truth. IGNORE the silly anomalies and exceptions.

    Why Cambridge? Its so competitive. and if you don't meet the requirements, it really isn't worth considering, unless your extremely passionate, since it would be a wasted choice.
    Wait- do you mean 8/9 A* AT A LEVEL? Who does 9 A Levels, let alone 9 linear ones?
    I had asked my carreers advisor at my school about Physics when I was choosing my A Levels but she advised me against it because she said that no university requires it and that some universities actually like a contrasting subject.

    I have over 6 months of volunteering at a care home plus 2 weeks of shadowing work experience.
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    (Original post by andreasz)
    Wait- do you mean 8/9 A* AT A LEVEL? Who does 9 A Levels, let alone 9 linear ones?
    I had asked my carreers advisor at my school about Physics when I was choosing my A Levels but she advised me against it because she said that no university requires it and that some universities actually like a contrasting subject.
    I should of made myself clearer, that section was referring to GCSEs, the numerical system has eased the application process for Oxbridge. As a result of Oxbridge being able to differentiate the creme de la creme from the coffee. That is why the numerical system is favoured by elite universities, since their academic standards and requirements remain optimum.

    "Contrasting subject"; Your advisor is....
    Although other subjects can install important skills, STEM subjects are amongst the common subjects.

    Approximately 27% of successful medical applicants did physics. (The 4th highest A level subject).
    Chemistry - 100%
    Biology- 98%
    Maths- Around 50-80
    Physics between 21-27
    Other subjects contribute to less than 5% of applicants.

    The BMAT has a physics section!
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    (Original post by Science99999)
    Right these were the words of the "Lecturer" who runs the medicine society. She began the medicine society, with the neccessary requirements of med schools, and she wanted to be frankly honest. The following is an account on her explanation: (DISCLAIMER)

    40% of medical applicants are immediately rejected. In the UK, there is approximately only 3000 places for medical schools. Therefore, considering the extreme competition, many universities have a filtering process.

    They immediately remove applicants below 7A*s. (Focus of Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants below the UKCAT threshold (Majority) (Not Oxbridge)
    They immediately remove appliants who score less than (AAA) - The magic number to even be considered. Oxbridge will consider you if you have atleast (A*A*A) but more likley if you are predicted (A*A*A*).
    They immediately remove applicants below the BMAT threshold they have set. (Oxbridge and BMAT universities)

    Now that you've been fished from the majority of applicants, your personal statement will be considered.

    Work experience: Some universities have a recommended min of 6 months volunteering (Start Now) A quality work experience, with some element of the NHS
    (3-4 places).

    Supercurricular: Essays, research programmes, competitions, olympiads, STEM related activties.

    Extracurriculars: COMPLETELY IGNORED (As mentioned on Oxbridge websites)

    Generally, the majority of successful candiates completed 4 A levels, and have 4 A*s. The reality is that you need atleast 8/9 A* to stand out, the magic number being 9/10.

    Interviews: They want to recognise if you're a suitable potential student that can be accustomed to the traditional, collegiate and tutorial styled/based learning ad environment.

    Now economics and med?
    Should of chosen physics. Many universities want students who have got an A/A* in physics.

    Requirement: A/A* in English language 7/8/9 (Preferably 8/9) A* in Sciences GCSE

    Oxbridge: A* in Chemistry ( A level)
    A* Biology (A level) And
    A*/A in another Science subject

    your're 4th related stem subject it a backup A*, to ensure you get atleast 3A*s.


    This is the reality of medicine, and is the truth. IGNORE the silly anomalies and exceptions.

    Why Cambridge? Its so competitive. and if you don't meet the requirements, it really isn't worth considering, unless your extremely passionate, since it would be a wasted choice.
    So are you saying that both Oxford and Cambridge immediately reject every UK applicant without at least 7 A* grades at GCSE?

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