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    No probs. I just spent too much of my time having physio and seeing orthopaedics! Apparently it's common to lose employees from the profession due to injury. Ultrasound has a very high percentage. Wish I knew that before I accepted the job!

    Also find it very repetitive work. A lot of places use trainees to provide a lot of the basic service (most of which is the repetitive stuff). I hardly got to do interesting stuff. You'll do best to go for something else!

    Shame you didn't enjoy your time in the path lab. I'm really hoping it'll be more interesting. Have been to the dept i'm going to be placed in and the people seem really nice, really got on with my new manager too which is always a positive sign!

    Anyway good luck with whatever you choose to do! Are you just graduating?
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    (Original post by VENIVIDIVICI)
    I told you we may hear back from today...but was hoping not to get the email. Anyway, that makes two of us...I didn't get in either....I still can't believe it, its like I'm still expecting to open the email attachment and read that I've been offered a position. Bloody gutted I am..after waiting so long...bummer.

    Ah well, best get my exams outta the way and think about what next. Must admit it has not been fun.
    Im sorry to hear u didnt get it. I can imagine how ur feeling. Were you told that all the rejections were already sent out for vascular before u got ur email today?
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    Hi everyone, I'm on a placement year at University in a clinical laboratory at the moment, as a trainee biomedical scientist. To everyone who's applied to the healthcare scientist training scheme - what have they told you about the actual job role and amount of clinical input/interpretation? Because from what I've learned so far on my placement, current Biomedical Scientists are essentially just slaves who maintain analysers, perform quality control, track samples and authorise results - hence why I'm so insanely bored with the placement right now. I'm hoping this new training scheme is way more 'hands-on' in the way of being more clinically involved...what are all your ideas?
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    (Original post by josh231990)
    Hi everyone, I'm on a placement year at University in a clinical laboratory at the moment, as a trainee biomedical scientist. To everyone who's applied to the healthcare scientist training scheme - what have they told you about the actual job role and amount of clinical input/interpretation? Because from what I've learned so far on my placement, current Biomedical Scientists are essentially just slaves who maintain analysers, perform quality control, track samples and authorise results - hence why I'm so insanely bored with the placement right now. I'm hoping this new training scheme is way more 'hands-on' in the way of being more clinically involved...what are all your ideas?
    It will be more hands on. Clinical/Healthcare Scientists work more on interpretation, bringing all the test results together and reporting to the doctors, so it involves much more understanding of the underlying science rather than being a lab monkey. The interpretation and reporting is more towards the end of the training since it takes years to fully understand everything, so a lot of the early training is similar to a biomed's work, but the basics are important and they'll work you up over the course of the training.

    I can only speak for the current system though, not sure how the new system changes things. The end goal of state registration is the same though.
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    (Original post by josh231990)
    Hi everyone, I'm on a placement year at University in a clinical laboratory at the moment, as a trainee biomedical scientist. To everyone who's applied to the healthcare scientist training scheme - what have they told you about the actual job role and amount of clinical input/interpretation? Because from what I've learned so far on my placement, current Biomedical Scientists are essentially just slaves who maintain analysers, perform quality control, track samples and authorise results - hence why I'm so insanely bored with the placement right now. I'm hoping this new training scheme is way more 'hands-on' in the way of being more clinically involved...what are all your ideas?
    I personally quite enjoy the 'lab monkey' side of things, and really enjoyed my trainee BMS placement in haematology. But I applied for the trainee healthcare scientist role to get a greater knowledge of the discipline, and have more a clinical input. What was lacking for me in the BMS role, was that everyone was just a name or a number, and you didn't get to follow through really with the patients. I'm hoping that the clincal scientist role will provide a bridge between doctors and BMSs, and I think that it will be a happy medium for me. As close as I want to get to being a doctor.
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    (Original post by josh231990)
    Hi everyone, I'm on a placement year at University in a clinical laboratory at the moment, as a trainee biomedical scientist. To everyone who's applied to the healthcare scientist training scheme - what have they told you about the actual job role and amount of clinical input/interpretation? Because from what I've learned so far on my placement, current Biomedical Scientists are essentially just slaves who maintain analysers, perform quality control, track samples and authorise results - hence why I'm so insanely bored with the placement right now. I'm hoping this new training scheme is way more 'hands-on' in the way of being more clinically involved...what are all your ideas?
    Depends on where you're a biomedical scientist though. As a trainee BMS I carried out two research projects, presented one at a conference, got to chat to some patients (that one's lab dependent), had clinical meetings where the lead clinical scientist reported back on individual results from patients so you could learn about their condition etc.

    Honestly? With a BMS you get out of it what you put into it. If all you do is sit and press buttons on a machine it will be very dull. But you can make it interesting.
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    (Original post by krazykipper)
    Depends on where you're a biomedical scientist though. As a trainee BMS I carried out two research projects, presented one at a conference, got to chat to some patients (that one's lab dependent), had clinical meetings where the lead clinical scientist reported back on individual results from patients so you could learn about their condition etc.

    Honestly? With a BMS you get out of it what you put into it. If all you do is sit and press buttons on a machine it will be very dull. But you can make it interesting.
    I definitely agree, you get out what you put in with being a BMS.
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    (Original post by krazykipper)
    Sorry, maybe I wasn't clear. This is the method that was used for one of the labs I applied for. But no, it's not the national scheme. (Though it hurts me that apparently someone at the Immunology interviews said that HIV infects B cells. They got an interview and I was reserve. )
    Could be wrong but my guess is that you are lying. You wouldn't know what others said at interview and the reserves come in after the interview not before

    Hmmmmm
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    (Original post by BMS123)
    Could be wrong but my guess is that you are lying. You wouldn't know what others said at interview and the reserves come in after the interview not before

    Hmmmmm
    There were reserves for the interview shortlist too - each Trust was asked to submit names of 4 shortlisted candidates and 10 reserves, who would be called if shortlisted people were already selected by other Trusts.
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    (Original post by funky-drummer)
    No probs. I just spent too much of my time having physio and seeing orthopaedics! Apparently it's common to lose employees from the profession due to injury. Ultrasound has a very high percentage. Wish I knew that before I accepted the job!

    Also find it very repetitive work. A lot of places use trainees to provide a lot of the basic service (most of which is the repetitive stuff). I hardly got to do interesting stuff. You'll do best to go for something else!

    Shame you didn't enjoy your time in the path lab. I'm really hoping it'll be more interesting. Have been to the dept i'm going to be placed in and the people seem really nice, really got on with my new manager too which is always a positive sign!

    Anyway good luck with whatever you choose to do! Are you just graduating?
    Cheers for the input. I didn't know that, so what was your actual job title?

    I spent 3 months in biochem, haem, transfusion and immunology and to be honest it wasn't what I thought it would be. The worst for me was biochem then haem with immunology and transfusion more enjoyable.

    Depending on the level your on, the lab and the specialism, experiences may vary for some in a BMS role compared to others...I think it was just the lab I was in that put me off and I got a lot of input and insights from senior BMS's about where pathology is going in the future, etc. Unless you're quite senior, or a clinical scientist, the BMS work in an average run of the mill lab just doesn't appeal to me. Too much repetitive work as well as maintaining analysers and no patient contact (unless its a specialised lab).

    I'm graduating this year. I'm much older than most undergraduates and this is a second career for me...was in financial consulting before that and got a Economics degree...so am disappointed as I had a lot riding on this post. Don't really want to go do a grade 5 BMS role...
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    (Original post by funky-drummer)
    Ok so I see what you are saying about BMS, I get the impression it's not quite the same thing as a clinical scientist. I wanted to do this STP scheme as it sounds like more interesting work with the clinical interpretation, investigation, patient contact, R&D and quality assurance etc. I want to use my brain which feels as though it's shrivelled to nothing over last 18 months! Felt like I was wasting my PhD. Biochem seems to have endless avenues, lots of depth although of course you never can tell until you actually get there and start doing a job.

    Maybe doing clinical scientist training rather than BMS would appeal to you more. Sounds like you're after something quite challenging. What's your degree? I've done research for a while in the past and you can't get bored with that! Always a good option to maybe take a stipend for a PhD and mull over your options for a bit. You won't harm your future prospects and you do get paid I thought doing research was great.

    My job as a trainee vascular technologist/scientist demands lots of very physical work rather than mental. Drives me nuts repeating the same task day in day out, and then the pain i'm constantly in from seeing silly amounts of patients in a day, like rolling them off the conveyor. Not much variation, just lots of bending, stretching, straining, pressing, pushing, looking, holding, enduring and sweating followed by repeating! It's definitely more of a technician role than a scientist, not really for anyone who wants a bit of a mental challenge.

    It's such a shame but I have been really disappointed with vascular. It wasn't what the job desciption suggested. Also just to add that the clinical life sciences are properly regulated (ACB, HPC, FRCPath etc) - some of the physiological sciences have no professional body at all - vascular for instance has only a voluntary register (SVT) with unrealistic targets (patient scan numbers) required for registration with them which is impossible in 18 months of specialism on STP programme (takes nearer to 4 years to acheive all the numbers). This is the first time they've tried to get trainees into vascular via this scheme and I don't think their portrayal of the job as requiring a science graduate entry scheme is very realistic. I think people will get very bored very quickly.

    Having said all that, are you going to reapply for STP next year? You could take a BMS role in he meantime, still good experience. I am assuming you must be studying BMS?
    This is all valuable info, thx once again. The short of it is that I'm studying a BMS accredited degree, though just over a year ago and after doing a stint in my local NHS lab, I didn't fancy it. I could do it if I want (but jnr/trainee BMS roles in my area have dried up), which means going where the work is. I wouldn't want to commute over an hour in the morning and evening, to a job I can't bear. Also, BMS requires working on rota, so shift work may be required when more experienced.

    I guess no job is ideal, clinical science will definitely be mentally challenging, that's why people like us want to g for it...I was so bored in that lab and got sick of specimen reception, loading analysers and checking patient samples for haemolysis..LOL. Anyway, I met a trainee clinical scientist when I was working there and realised I wanted to see if I can get onto the programme. Sadly, I didn't get on and I don't think I'm be applying next year either. I'll have to find something else. I was thinking of further studies, but really wanted to get some "real work" under my belt, earn some money and get a paid Masters to boot with this scheme.

    I've got to go and finish my project (3rd yr) in a research lab after exams...at my own cost. There's no opportunities there and I'm running out of money to fund my travelling there. Funny how I moved away from biochem to what you did and you moving away from vascular to biochem...
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    Has anyone else on here had an offer for MedPhys in Liverpool?
    Think im the only one on here so far :/ itd be cool to get to know anyone who im gonna be working with...
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    Hi Guys

    I'm new to the student room; joined to get some info on applying for the STP. I'm coming towards the end of my second year human biology degree. The degree includes modules such as immunology and pathophysiology; will I be in a disadvantageous position in the selection process as I'm doing quite a broad degree?

    I've completed the module in immunology and loved it! I'm in the process of trying to get some clinical work experience in immunology hospital departments in london, but so far my only experience consists of a placement at the Royal Veterinary College - pathology department. After reading the messages other members have posted they seem to have ALOT more relevant experience i.e 6months in a clinical lab/research lab. Will my application be thrown out if I don't have a solid block of 3months+ experience?

    I want to apply for the 2012 intake however that means the latest I can fill an application form is February 2012. I'm scared I wont have enough time to secure a lengthy work experience placement to write about in the additional information section.
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    I have rob for medical phyiscs too .

    Have you heard anything back from liverpool yet? I got the email from Westmidlands confirming i accepted their offer and that the trust would get in touch, but nothing as yet.
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    Hi I'm new to this but I've been reading since the beginning of the application process

    I got rejected from clinical biochemistry last week

    Is there anyone who has applied for the Welsh jobs too????
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    (Original post by tasha_herts)
    Hi Guys

    I'm new to the student room; joined to get some info on applying for the STP. I'm coming towards the end of my second year human biology degree. The degree includes modules such as immunology and pathophysiology; will I be in a disadvantageous position in the selection process as I'm doing quite a broad degree?

    I've completed the module in immunology and loved it! I'm in the process of trying to get some clinical work experience in immunology hospital departments in london, but so far my only experience consists of a placement at the Royal Veterinary College - pathology department. After reading the messages other members have posted they seem to have ALOT more relevant experience i.e 6months in a clinical lab/research lab. Will my application be thrown out if I don't have a solid block of 3months+ experience?

    I want to apply for the 2012 intake however that means the latest I can fill an application form is February 2012. I'm scared I wont have enough time to secure a lengthy work experience placement to write about in the additional information section.
    Heya,
    In my opinion, you will definitely have to talk up your degree, especially the relevant sections, and show that you have covered topics in enough depth/done outside reading.

    As for clinical laboratory experience, I think that it is not a definite need for getting to interview, as people I was interviewed with did not have lab experience outside of university. However, laboratory experience really helps when they question you on your clinical knowledge of the subject.

    I would suggest that you decide upon a discipline that you are interested and focus on getting some lab experience in that area. Then really talk it up in your personal statement.

    Is there any chance of you taking a placement year between your 2/3rd year? Working in a laboratory somewhere?

    Best of luck for your final year!
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    (Original post by VENIVIDIVICI)
    This is all valuable info, thx once again. The short of it is that I'm studying a BMS accredited degree, though just over a year ago and after doing a stint in my local NHS lab, I didn't fancy it. I could do it if I want (but jnr/trainee BMS roles in my area have dried up), which means going where the work is. I wouldn't want to commute over an hour in the morning and evening, to a job I can't bear. Also, BMS requires working on rota, so shift work may be required when more experienced.

    I guess no job is ideal, clinical science will definitely be mentally challenging, that's why people like us want to g for it...I was so bored in that lab and got sick of specimen reception, loading analysers and checking patient samples for haemolysis..LOL. Anyway, I met a trainee clinical scientist when I was working there and realised I wanted to see if I can get onto the programme. Sadly, I didn't get on and I don't think I'm be applying next year either. I'll have to find something else. I was thinking of further studies, but really wanted to get some "real work" under my belt, earn some money and get a paid Masters to boot with this scheme.

    I've got to go and finish my project (3rd yr) in a research lab after exams...at my own cost. There's no opportunities there and I'm running out of money to fund my travelling there. Funny how I moved away from biochem to what you did and you moving away from vascular to biochem...
    Well, I would say that further studies will broaden your options and certainly won't harm your future prospects. If you're best suited to biochem maybe it would be worth a shot next year, sounds like you'd more likely have success in this area with all your experience. For physiological sciences it's usually advisable to have patient contact experience etc. as it's a huge part of the job so don't know if that would help if you still wanted to try for vascular again. I know that's what helped me to get vascular. Yeh funny how you want to do what I don't and vice versa! I guess no job is ideal, but as long as it's the best match for you that's all that really matters.
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    Hey guys,

    Just as a guide, could some of those who were accepted post their qualifications/experience for the information of those planning on applying next year?
    This would be great

    Thanks

    Respy
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    Thanks Queen Ali!

    From now til Feb 2012 I am going to contacting immunology labs; were you successful in the interviewing process?

    I was thinking about taking a year out to do a placement but I've thought about it and the best thing I think is to apply for the STP this year and if I don't get onto the scheme then I can find a placement and hopefully it'll better my chances when applying the second time round!

    What kind of questions did they ask you in your interview, problem solving/ data-interp type questions? Or was it mostly a discussion on your experience and knowledge?

    Thanks for the good luck
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    (Original post by Vaah)
    I have rob for medical phyiscs too .

    Have you heard anything back from liverpool yet? I got the email from Westmidlands confirming i accepted their offer and that the trust would get in touch, but nothing as yet.
    Hey nah, same here. Ive accepted but im still waiting to hear from the trust. I was told by a friend that they might wait until after exams and stuff are finished, for our sake. tbh tho id rather get it all sorted asap :/

    Where are you from anyway?
 
 
 
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